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pate sablee crust


schneich
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hi,

we are about to change the look of our tartes. until now we used paper tarte pans. they had quite a flatish wall, so there was never any problem. now we want a 90 degree wall since we find it much more beautiful (like here) but always whe i blind bake the sucker the wall collapses and falls over. i am going mad on this. i have two dough recipes available, a french 1-1-2 with a lot of sugar and less butter, and an austrian 1-2-3 with less sugar and more butter. the austrian is much more crumbly, and quite fragile, the french one is smoother and nicer to work with but both collapsed. what kind of recipe does the pro´s use for this application? what temperature is best ? please help...

cheers from cologne

torsten s. schoeneich

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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are you using any kind of weight in the shell when you blind bake? if you line the tart with plastic wrap and fill with beans all the way up to the top, you shouldn't have any problems. bake until the edges are light golden and by then the dough should be set up enough to remove the beans and finish the baking. just don't let the plastic wrap come in contact with any metal. wrap it loosely around the beans.

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are you using any kind of weight in the shell when you blind bake?  if you line the tart with plastic wrap and fill with beans all the way up to the top, you shouldn't have any problems.  bake until the edges are light golden and by then the dough should be set up enough to remove the beans and finish the baking.  just don't let the plastic wrap come in contact with any metal.  wrap it loosely around the beans.

Ditto. I might just add that those clear plastic roasting bags, cut to size, work great as a liner, too.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I've had great results by rolling out the dough, putting it in the pan, chilling it really hard, almost freezing, docking it, place parchment on top and another pan the same size on that and baking it upside down on a sheetpan. No shrinkage or slippage at all.

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Thanks for referring to my tart dough recipe Beanie!! :smile:

I will note however, that I've never used that dough to do a 90 degree wall like schneich is talking about. It's very possible that the edges can fall over even with my dough just because of the physics of it all. I'd probably go with the beans/plastic wrap method for this particular application, even though it is a giant pain in the you-know-what.

I love the roasting bag idea! I have always thought if I could re-use the little plastic pouches filled with beans (or uncooked rice; that's what I use-the rice fits into the nooks and crannies of tart tins better), then I wouldn't mind using that method so much. The plastic wrap thing works great, but the plastic wrap only works one time only, and you have to use new plastic wrap every time. If you made little roasting bag pouches, you could re-use them and save time!! I like it I like it. :smile:

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i was taught to use the plastic wrap thing in blind-baking and while i loved the ease of it compared to parchment or foil, i've always wondered if the heat from the oven would cause chemicals in the plastic to leach into the food - anyone? anyone?

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i've always wondered if the heat from the oven would cause chemicals in the plastic to leach into the food - anyone? anyone?

:wacko: Oh god....don't get 'em started.......... :wacko:

I figure with all that plastic wrap I use and plastic bowls in the microwave, my number will be up next Wednesday. :raz:

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At work we do tartlets (7cm in diameter) with a 90 degree wall and never had a problem with the wall falling over. I'm not sure what might be causing that problem for you. We use an almost-1-2-3 recipe.

Hmm... make sure your dough is cold before molding the tarts. The way we do it is, we roll out the dough, cut discs, and chill them. Then we put our rings on a baking sheet, spray the insides with vegetable oil, and then mold the tartlets. Make sure you press well on the joint of the base and the walls, so you get a nice sharp edge.

Cheers,

Federico

Edited by polpus (log)
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