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Kerry Beal

Tiramisu -- Bake-Off II

28 posts in this topic

Tiramisu is mentioned in the 'Out of Style' Foods you love and the '80's dessert, what would you make' thread, yet several recipes in recipeGullet indicate that we eG'ers still enjoy a good version of this classic dessert.

Some recipes use sponge cake, some soft lady fingers and other's (which are labelled 'authentic') use savoiardi ladyfingers. Most recipes for tiramisu contain coffee and some form of chocolate, however there are mentions of recipes that contain neither, such as one that contains just limencello soaked ladyfingers. A Green Tea Tiramisu served at Saito in Seattle sounds intriguing and Matcha tiramisu is mentioned frequently in various threads.

Then of course we have this recipe from Sandra Lee (semi-homemade cooking) that uses refrigerated prepared pudding cups. I think I'll pass on that one.

One thread contains a reference to a story in the Washington Post's food section where an intern mistakenly used okra in place of ladyfingers in tiramisu. Apparently a hilarious story, but I think I'll pass on that one too.

Then there is Krispy Creme Tiramisu. A third pass for me.

So lets get out our ladyfingers, espresso and mascarpone (or whatever substitutes we want to try) and see what we can collectively do with tiramisu in this second 'bake-off'.

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As Ina Garten( The Barefoot Contessa) says : Tiramasu has been done, done and overdone", but I must say, her Tiramasu rocks!! ( and, I dont even like coffee that much).

I made this at work on Friday. My boss made it once before and hated it. I said " Let me make it" and so I did. We had a tasting of many different items for a new catering menu. Everyone raved about it. I made it once before for a dinner I catered last year. Its very simple and not too sweet.

I used 30 saviardi lady fingers, 1lb of mascarpone, 6 egg yolks, 1/4 cup of sugar, brewed coffee( we didnt have any espresso), rum and a mocha liquor.

I shaved some dark choc. on top.

gallery_25969_665_403971.jpg

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A Green Tea Tiramisu served at Saito in Seattle sounds intriguing

The bakery that makes this tiramisu for Saito - Hiroki - is a couple of blocks from my house. I've had the tiramisu before and it is.....interesting. But I still prefer the traditional.

I do like a good tiramisu. Maybe this will be my "easter" dessert!


Practice Random Acts of Toasting

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On my tiramisu' I like only Pavesini , not ladyfinger or savoiardi or anything else.

I have one version that uses a milk /liquor soak for the savoiardi and uses the coffe in the cream,pretty interesting , still traditional.Tiramisu isnt one of my favorite , but if I have to eat it I only eat my mom's tiramisu :laugh:

We use to make a mandarin orange version in our restaurant as well.


Vanessa

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Just bumping this up in case it got overlooked.


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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The recipe I use if from my BIL's mother.

1 kg Mascapone

8 egg yolks

6 Tablespoons sugar

Expresso coffee

Pavesini

Mix together mascapone, egg yolks and sugar until creamy. Dip Pavesini in expresso, layer until done.

The mascapone can be a problem, some UHT brands here in Australia end up curdling when mixed.

I'm away for a few weeks, but will try to get to it soon.

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On my tiramisu' I like only Pavesini , not ladyfinger or savoiardi or anything else.

I've never had Pavesini before. What makes it different than ladyfingers or savoiardi?

Is it sweeter? Spongier? Crunchier? Less sweet? I make a pretty good tiramisu (the Annie version), but I'm always looking for improvements. I sure wish mascarpone wasn't such a bitch to find sometimes. :sad:

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I sure wish mascarpone wasn't such a bitch to find sometimes. :sad:

I don't have any trouble finding it. Most of the supermarkets in my area are owned by Italians, but I sure wish I could find it less expensively. The price varies between $8 and $10 and that makes you stop and think before making tiramisu.

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yes, mascarpone is awfully expensive--and what you get in the supermarket isn't too wonderful--I've tried subbing different combos of heavy cream, sour cream and cream cheese without really liking any of them.

Has anyone tried making it? I found a few different recipes for making it here

http://www.heavenlytiramisu.com/mascarpo.htm

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We are not big coffee fans, so I dip ladyfingers in a coffee/ammaretto mixture instead of the coffee liquer. I'll try to dig out my recipe. We got it in Tuscany several years ago from the lady who was the housekeeper at the place we stayed.


Stop Family Violence

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I love the right kind of restaurant tiramisu (which I've never made) -- I thing it should offer some fairly perceptible contrast between the coffee and the dairy, both in terms of liquidy/unctous and bitter/sweet aspects, and that the cakey/ladyfinger part should sort of mediate. I hate tiramisu when it's too sweet, too whipped-creamy, or too cakey. But what I'm noticing here is freaking me out -- are raw egg-yolks necessary? Common? And is that okay?

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I sure wish mascarpone wasn't such a bitch to find sometimes. :sad:

I don't have any trouble finding it. Most of the supermarkets in my area are owned by Italians, but I sure wish I could find it less expensively. The price varies between $8 and $10 and that makes you stop and think before making tiramisu.

My mom has told me about seeing it in Costco on occasion for about $5 for the same container that's $8-$10 at the grocery store. Keep your eyes peeled!


Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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If I can actually find mascarpone at Costco for something less than a mortgage payment I might be persuaded to play.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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yes, mascarpone is awfully expensive--and what you get in the supermarket isn't too wonderful--I've tried subbing different combos of heavy cream, sour cream and cream cheese without really liking any of them.

Has anyone tried making it?  I found a few different recipes for making it here

http://www.heavenlytiramisu.com/mascarpo.htm

I make mascarpone all the time from heavy whipping cream. The process is extremely easy and the results keep for close to a week in the fridge. You need to start it the day before to allow for draining.

It's been awhile since I bought commercial mascarpone, so I can't provide a direct comparison with store-bought mascarpone. I'll have to buy a tub one of these days for comparison purposes. I started making mascarpone because of lack of availability in my immediate neighborhood, and the price.

I agree that cream cheese is not a great sub for mascarpone in tiramisu. I do like some of the tiramisu variations that only use whipped cream as a filling, especially when I want something really light. I've loosely followed David Rocco's Lemon Tiramisu recipe and would definitely make it again.

http://www.davidrocco.com/cookbook/villama...ontiramisu.html

Here's a separate thread on making mascarpone:

Homemade mascarpone


Edited by sanrensho (log)

Baker of "impaired" cakes...

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I found a huge tub of Marscapone at Kash and Karry for very cheap ..Trader Joe's has the small containers that are not too badly priced but Kash and Karry has the best buy I have found


why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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Made Adam's recipe using TWO WHOLE BIG :biggrin: 100g tubs of mascarpone and 2 egg yolks, substituting "suzu castella" like this - scroll down to "gyunyu suzu castella" for pavesini, savoiardi, ladyfingers etc. The "bell cakes" were dipped in strong black coffee with a little rum in it.

I was a bit dubious about the mascarpone mixture, but since the sponges were not totally drowned in the mixture, it was very nice chilled. In fact, I was very happy not to meet cream or chocolate - slightly bitter, fragrant cake vs. one smooth rich sauce was enough.

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I googled Pavesini and they seem to me to be very close to Savoiardi--i.e., dry, slightly sweet ladyfinger shaped biscuits. One site says "no fat added," and the package of Savoiardi in my cupboard has no fat in the ingredients. The point is, I think, that these dry biscuits really soak up the coffee mixture.

Now, does anyone know whether cream of tartar is the same thing as tartaric acid? (for use in the homemade mascarpone recipes)

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I googled Pavesini and they seem to me to be very close to Savoiardi--i.e., dry, slightly sweet ladyfinger shaped biscuits. One site says "no fat added," and the package of Savoiardi in my cupboard has no fat in the ingredients. The point is, I think, that these dry biscuits really soak up the coffee mixture.

Now, does anyone know whether cream of tartar is the same thing as tartaric acid? (for use in the homemade mascarpone recipes)

Cream of tartar is not the same as tartaric acid. Tartaric acid is used in wine making so check there for it.

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Okay...I had to respond. I am new...so don't mind me. But...I make a vanilla butter custard and layer it was espresso soaked shortbreads. It gives it a dense and deep flavor. Give is more of a "bite" to it. I would be happy to share the recipe.


To this big wide world...you are just one person...but to one person...you may mean the "world"!

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Okay...I had to respond.  I am new...so don't mind me. But...I make a vanilla butter custard and layer it was espresso soaked shortbreads. It gives it a dense and deep flavor. Give is more of a "bite" to it.  I would be happy to share the recipe.

Welcome Winddove. Sounds very interesting. I'd love to see the recipe and pictures if you have them.

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