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annecros

Florida Grapefruit Rebounds

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My poor grapefruit trees didn't bear for three years. We've moved away from that place, and don't have a tree here, so I am hoping for cheap fruit this Fall.

Click for short article

Florida, the world's largest grower of grapefruit, was then hit with devastating hurricanes during back to back harvest seasons, particularly in 2005 with 26 named storms in one season. Infamous Hurricanes including Katrina, Rita and Wilma extensively damaged many grapefruit groves leading to loss of production and higher costs to the consumer for fruit that does make it to the supermarket.

This year, grapefruit is rebounding and making its way back to the spotlight. The Florida grapefruit harvest is expected to almost double from 19 million boxes a year ago to 28 million this year. The industry high was reached in the mid 1990's with some 55 million boxes of grapefruit harvested. The industry is also eagerly awaiting the results of several research studies currently being conducted which could shed light on the grapefruit diet myth, as well as its role in possibly helping prevent certain types of cancer.

"This harvest season, the trees are on the mend and we are producing more grapefruit than we could have imagined after witnessing the destruction," said Daryl Jacobs, an Ocean Spray grapefruit grower in Florida. "Grapefruit has become somewhat of a forgotten fruit in recent years. With more grapefruit available this season, we want people to get reacquainted with the other Florida citrus - the refreshingly healthy grapefruit."

The industry really, really needs a good year, and I need some fresh grapefruit.

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Maybe your trees are too old? Citrus trees don't have huge life spans. So buy a new tree or two. There are other possible problems. What problem(s) do you think you have?

I'm afraid the sale of grapefuit will become more problematic because of its drug interactions (e.g., just about everyone who takes statin drugs is advised not to eat grapefuit). Robyn

P.S. My husband can't eat grapefuit - but I like it - so I buy the Sun Fresh red grapefruit - found in the plastic containers in the fresh fruit section of Publix.


Edited by robyn (log)

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Maybe your trees are too old?  Citrus trees don't have huge life spans.  So buy a new tree or two.  There are other possible problems.  What problem(s) do you think you have?

I'm afraid the sale of grapefuit will become more problematic because of its drug interactions (e.g., just about everyone who takes statin drugs is advised not to eat grapefuit).  Robyn

P.S.  My husband can't eat grapefuit - but I like it - so I buy the Sun Fresh red grapefruit - found in the plastic containers in the fresh fruit section of Publix.

My problems, in Palm Beach County, were hurricanes. Frances uprooted, and threw over a six foot privacy fence, my Honeybelle tree. Fortunately, that was the worst of the damage. And we rapidly got used to replacing privacy fences biannually.

We just relocated in October, and I am slowly getting this place smacked into shape agriculture wise. Takes a lot of compost, sweat and planning. It is amazing the differences in the microclimate between here and a 30 minute drive north.

I think I will have better luck with avacado and lime where I am now. But I am a huge sucker for citrus and am scoping a likely spot for a ruby red.

I am sorry your husband can't enjoy. I am partial myself! :biggrin:


Edited by annecros (log)

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Maybe your trees are too old? Citrus trees don't have huge life spans. So buy a new tree or two. There are other possible problems. What problem(s) do you think you have?

I have a couple of grapefruit trees in my yard. One is a very old one that came with the house, that still produces white fruit but half of the tree has reverted back to the wild stock which looks like a grapefruit sized lemon. When cut it looks like a grapefruit inside but is sour as a lemon without the fragrent lemon smell. I just squeezed 2 liters of juice from these sour fruits that I'll use like sour orange in marinades. My other tree is a small ruby red that has just started to bare fruit. I love all citrus.


Edited by scubadoo97 (log)

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Maybe your trees are too old? Citrus trees don't have huge life spans. So buy a new tree or two. There are other possible problems. What problem(s) do you think you have?

I have a couple of grapefruit trees in my yard. One is a very old one that came with the house, that still produces white fruit but half of the tree has reverted back to the wild stock which looks like a grapefruit sized lemon. When cut it looks like a grapefruit inside but is sour as a lemon without the fragrent lemon smell. I just squeezed 2 liters of juice from these sour fruits that I'll use like sour orange in marinades. My other tree is a small ruby red that has just started to bare fruit. I love all citrus.

I live in north Florida - and have a couple of grafted trees. If the winters are too cold - the tops are dead - and you have to prune almost back to rootstock. Not the best way to get good fruit.

If I lived in south Florida - I'd just pick up some cheap trees from Walmart - Home Depot - etc. Might take a couple of years for them to bear fruit - but it's worth it. With all the weather and bug stuff - I'd rather buy a few 3 gallon plants and take my chances than spend hundreds of dollars on a big tree. Robyn

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