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Luster Dust, safe or not?


sote23
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Hi,

I've not used luster dust before and was looking up sources for it online. Most of the places that sell it say it's non-toxic, but should not be used on anything that will be eaten. I've seen luster dust on finished chocolates before.

My question is luster dust edible or not? how is it non toxic, yet unedible?

Luis

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Let's not let the cat out of the bag lest someone in California hear about this and pass some other anti-dragee law. You know dragees are illegal there. However, and with a cake loaded with spoofle dust headed out the door just this afternoon, let me be the first to say, I don't want to eat much of it myself. Even when I wash some of the paint containers (when you mix it with alcohol in a little dish to paint with it) even in the dishwasher the paint doesn't wash off. I don't want to know what it does to your guts, y'know?

Umm, that is one thing ole maligned Wilton has in it's favor it doesn't make stuff that's not fda. Their spoofle dusts suck too, but you can't have everything I guess.

Florist foil, long a staple in cake deco, is not food safe. But Wilton carries food safe foil.

Those lovely artistical powders, sadly not food safe. Crayons are non-toxic but you should not eat them. Same same.

So maybe that's why God created fondant, so we can spoofle dust it for beauty and then discard it.

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Buy it HERE

I have had no problems with it.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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you'll notice at chefrubber they carry two different lines of metallic colors (either in cocoa butter or not)...one of them is fda approved and the other one isn't.

if you're concerned at all, pcb products are probably safe as (in my opinion) european products are more stringently tested than american products.

there are enough choices that are fda approved that you can assuage your conscience, but the small amounts used and the small amounts ingested are probably not a problem. i'd be more concerned with how much we're ingesting while spraying that stuff without wearing a mask!

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i'd be more concerned with how much we're ingesting while spraying that stuff without wearing a mask!

That is for very sure.

Umm, so basically, if one were being completely perfect, one would use the fda approved stuff on the cake itself and the non-toxic on the removable decor. But if the Wilton is any indicator, that fda approved stuff sucks.

Has anyone tried the other brands of fda approved stuff??

edit for spelling

Edited by K8memphis (log)
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I decorate chocolates with luster dust from PCB. The only ingredient is iron oxides (E172 to those in the EU). "Naturally occurring pigments of iron, which can be yellow, red, orange, brown or black in colour ... toxic at 'high doses', banned in Germany." read more

I spoke with the manufacturer who assured me, "how can I put this delicately? It comes out just the same as it goes in." Ok, so the manufacturer says its inert.

I further assured myself with a quick calculation: for a consumer to eat 1g of luster dust they would have to eat 32kg of my chocolates. After which luster dust would be the least of their worries!

PS: Note my avatar

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I decorate chocolates with luster dust from PCB. The only ingredient is iron oxides (E172 to those in the EU). "Naturally occurring pigments of iron, which can be yellow, red, orange, brown or black in colour ... toxic at 'high doses', banned in Germany." read more

I spoke with the manufacturer who assured me, "how can I put this delicately? It comes out just the same as it goes in." Ok, so the manufacturer says its inert.

I further assured myself with a quick calculation: for a consumer to eat 1g of luster dust they would have to eat 32kg of my chocolates. After which luster dust would be the least of their worries!

PS: Note my avatar

Germany seems to be more stringent then others.

Luis

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