Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

American products available in France?


Recommended Posts

I assume that the Monoprix on Opera has this product. It flew out of our host's frig door and broke. The French plastic is thinner than the American.

If Monoprix lacks it, I guess the choice will have to be Bon Marche across the river. Any other usggestions I should consider.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I assume that the Monoprix on Opera has this product.  It flew out of our host's frig door and broke.  The French plastic is thinner than the American. 

If Monoprix lacks it, I guess the choice will have to be Bon Marche across the river.  Any other usggestions I should consider.

I'm pretty sure you can get Heinz ketchup everywhere.

Edited by Felice (log)

www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I assume that the Monoprix on Opera has this product.  It flew out of our host's frig door and broke.  The French plastic is thinner than the American. 

If Monoprix lacks it, I guess the choice will have to be Bon Marche across the river.  Any other usggestions I should consider.

My Monoprix carries it; no need to look farther.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

I'm moving back to France in a couple weeks, and I was wondering if I would be able to find some of my favorite things in the market. Here is a list:

1. Old Bay Seasoning

2. Guava paste or marmalade

3. Sweetened condensed milk

4. Buttermilk

5. Latin-American ingredients (Adobo, and seasonings)

Anything else that anybody cares to add to the list? I already know I will have to make my own cream cheese!! :unsure:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Chef,where in France are you going. In paris, there's a shop in the Marais, called, "Thanksgiving" that sells American products.

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly....MFK Fisher

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1. Old Bay Seasoning

Very unlikely. Order online.

2. Guava paste or marmalade

In Carribean stores, magasins antillais, épiceries antillaises. Note that some large Asian markets (Tang frères, Exo-Store in the XIIIe, Thanh Binh on rue Lagrange, and the Wa Seng store at 18, boulevard Garibaldi) have carribean sections. So do some large French supermarkets. Look for pâte de goyave, confiture or gelée de goyave.

3. Sweetened condensed milk

All over the place (lait concentré sucré).

4. Buttermilk

Not labeled as such; look for "lait ribot" (a Breton specialty) or more simply the lait fermenté (often drank with couscous) sold in cartons in North African stores. You can also find it in supermarkets. Quite common.

5. Latin-American ingredients (Adobo, and seasonings)

Increasingly harder to find since most of the few Mexican stores in Paris closed during the last few years. You're more likely to find the odd bumpy can of jalapenos in escabeche and the horrid Old El Paso taco sauce (supermarkets) than a proper array of Latin American products. Mexi & Co (rue Dante, 5e) still has a few things. There again I would advise you to order from an online source. (For Peruvian produce see Casa Picaflor on rue Tiquetonne and there is a Colombian grocer on rue du Chemin-Vert. One tiny shop on rue du Cherche-Midi near Montparnasse and an Argentinian store on boulevard Saint-Germain near place Maubert but that's all I can think of.)

Anything else that anybody cares to add to the list?  I already know I will have to make my own cream cheese!!

Why in the world should you? There's Philadelphia at the Grande Epicerie du Bon Marché and Kiri, Saint-Moret, Mme Loic, Carré Frais, etc., in every grocery and supermarket. And fresh brillat-savarin in cheese stores. Cream cheese is surely not the thing that's missing the most from French stores.

Other things we miss is properly aged beef (our beef is not fatty enough to be aged, unfortunately some restaurateurs, even starred ones, think they can serve aged charolais and it's a disaster), decent bread flour (in retail stores; the boulangers have it but they're not always willing to sell some), dairy sour cream (why oh why? But this is easy to make at home), large fresh shrimp, etc. Good cheddar cheese is hard to find but it can be found.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to be in Avignon, it's not exactly driving distance to Paris!!! I'm probably going to pay a fortune in shipping if I order everything online. I guess I'll have to add these things to my Christmas wishlists!! :unsure: I've found the cultures for sour cream and most cheeses online from cheese making shops. What would you consider the closest cheese to Philadelphia Cream Cheese? One that will stand up to baking, but mild enough in flavor that I can use it in many different preparations....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What would you consider the closest cheese to Philadelphia Cream Cheese?  One that will stand up to baking, but mild enough in flavor that I can use it in many different preparations....

French chefs pâtissiers use Kiri.

Saint-Môret is a bit too sourish and Carré Frais Gervais a bit too watery.

If you find Samos 99 (an old-fashioned, rare brand), grab it, that's the real thing.

Wherever you are, just browse supermarkets carefully and check any ethnic (Asian, North African, Antillais, etc.) market there may be — there is usually at least one in each city, not mentioning specialty shops. You'll be surprised by the many interesting things you'll find. And you will also find tons of good stuff in Marseille.

Ordering online only concerns spice mixes and Latino condiments, and I believe that's worth it.

Edited by Ptipois (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

I just came across the following website for getting American (and Irish, English and Scottish too) product in Paris. They have a fairly comprohensive website which says they have a shop in the 10th. But it appears that you can order online and I assume have things delivered.

www.epicerie-americaine.com

www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just came across the following website for getting American (and Irish, English and Scottish too) product in Paris.  They have a fairly comprohensive website which says they have a shop in the 10th.  But it appears that you can order online and I assume have things delivered.

www.epicerie-americaine.com

Impressive - but I'm still trying to find real Jewish grated horseradish not the French creme nor the Brit Colman's which do not work in one of my recipes. Until 9/11 I schlepped over mine but I'm afraid the liquid would disqualify it as medication. Ditto for real Heinz's Chili Sauce whose "export" label makes me suspicious. And, on the same theme, I'm still importing cocktail (cashew and pea-) nuts, they seem different. But as with so many things, maybe it's just me.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would travel to any corner of Paris to find an actual horseradish root, my weekend bloody mary isn't quite complete without it.

"When planning big social gatherings at our home, I wait until the last minute to tell my wife. I figure she is going to worry either way, so I let her worry for two days rather than two weeks."
-EW
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would travel to any corner of Paris to find an actual horseradish root, my weekend bloody mary isn't quite complete without it.

you could grow some in a window box...we had great success that way in HK before we had a garden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 months later...
1.  Old Bay Seasoning

Very unlikely. Order online.

Hi Chef,where in France are you going. In paris, there's a shop in the Marais, called, "Thanksgiving" that sells American products.
Update: For some reason, oh yes, I was en route to lunch on the Rue St Paul, I found myself at Thanksgiving. It's wonderful and horrible at the same time; Reese's bits and Fruit Loops, but also many tins of Old Bay. I cruised it and left empty-handed; maybe someday..... Edited by John Talbott (log)

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
For some reason, oh yes, I was en route to lunch on the Rue St Paul, I found myself at Thanksgiving.  It's wonderful and horrible at the same time; Reese's bits and Fruit Loops, but also many tins of Old Bay.  I cruised it and left empty-handed; maybe someday.....

Still didn't buy anything at Thanksgiving today. But they do have soft tortillas. David Lebovitz also indicated they're available elsewhere.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I found Pepperidge Farm chicken/turkey stuffing mix there, and cranberries in holiday season. I went there to get fixings once for a "traditional American" Thanksgiving dinner.

Thanksgiving also does Sunday brunch, but I wouldn't recommend it. My elderly French neighbors love that brunch, and also have just discovered Oreos. Sigh . . .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I read through the list of things western hemisphere sought in France, my immediate thought is, why not bring with you your taste memory and buy local products that most closely resemble them in flavor and texture. We've found this an extraordinary introduction to new product and, better, lovely new interpretations.

eGullet member #80.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By dcarch
      Happy Bastille Day!
       
      As I was thinking of cooking something appropriate for today and have the music playing in the background. 
      I thought the lyrics of the France National Anthem can be slightly modified and used against the covid-19 tyranny. 
       
      I did make crepe for breakfast, but have not decided what to make for dinner. May be I will make something for tomorrow.
       
      Anyone have ideas?
       
      dcarch
       
       
    • By bleudauvergne
      Clafoutis de Fevettes au Parmesean et Basilic
      Serves 4 as Main Dishor 6 as Side.
      This recipe appears in French in issue no. 140 of the Saveurs magazine as part of a series of recipes accompanying an article on 'primeurs', or local vegetables that appear at the markets only during the first few weeks of Spring.
      It can be prepared with feves that have been frozen fresh, but I would not recommend using dried beans.
      This recipe should work fine with both American all purpose and French type 55 flour, as the quantity called for is slight in comparison to the other ingredients.

      500 g fresh young feves
      4 eggs
      20 cl milk
      10 cl heavy cream (liquid)
      70 g freshly grated parmesean
      2 T flour
      1 small bouquet of basil
      1/2 tsp salt
      1/4 tsp grated nutmeg
      fresh ground white pepper

      Preheat your oven to 160 C / 320 F.
      Blanche the feves a large pot of boiling salted water and refresh in cold water. Drain and reserve.
      Combine the eggs, the milk and cream in a large bowl and beat until well combined.
      Wash and dry the basil, remove the leaves from the stems and mince it finely.
      Add the salt, the flour, the parmesean, the pepper, the grated nutmeg, and the freshly minced basil. Add the young feves.
      Butter a clafoutis dish (noted in the recipe as 'un plat a clafoutis', but which a deep sided 10" square dish such as a corningwear would work, or a large loaf pan), give the batter a last mix, pour it into the pan, and put it in the pre-heated oven. Bake for approximately 35 minutes, until the top is golden brown and the center seems firm when you shake the pan.
      Serve it hot or cold, with a simple roquette salad or with chicken, rabbit, or veal. Goes well with a good rose champagne.
      Keywords: Main Dish, French, Appetizer, Hors d'oeuvre, Easy
      ( RG1243 )
    • By bleudauvergne
      Clafoutis de Fevettes au Parmesean et Basilic
      Serves 4 as Main Dishor 6 as Side.
      This recipe appears in French in issue no. 140 of the Saveurs magazine as part of a series of recipes accompanying an article on 'primeurs', or local vegetables that appear at the markets only during the first few weeks of Spring.
      It can be prepared with feves that have been frozen fresh, but I would not recommend using dried beans.
      This recipe should work fine with both American all purpose and French type 55 flour, as the quantity called for is slight in comparison to the other ingredients.

      500 g fresh young feves
      4 eggs
      20 cl milk
      10 cl heavy cream (liquid)
      70 g freshly grated parmesean
      2 T flour
      1 small bouquet of basil
      1/2 tsp salt
      1/4 tsp grated nutmeg
      fresh ground white pepper

      Preheat your oven to 160 C / 320 F.
      Blanche the feves a large pot of boiling salted water and refresh in cold water. Drain and reserve.
      Combine the eggs, the milk and cream in a large bowl and beat until well combined.
      Wash and dry the basil, remove the leaves from the stems and mince it finely.
      Add the salt, the flour, the parmesean, the pepper, the grated nutmeg, and the freshly minced basil. Add the young feves.
      Butter a clafoutis dish (noted in the recipe as 'un plat a clafoutis', but which a deep sided 10" square dish such as a corningwear would work, or a large loaf pan), give the batter a last mix, pour it into the pan, and put it in the pre-heated oven. Bake for approximately 35 minutes, until the top is golden brown and the center seems firm when you shake the pan.
      Serve it hot or cold, with a simple roquette salad or with chicken, rabbit, or veal. Goes well with a good rose champagne.
      Keywords: Main Dish, French, Appetizer, Hors d'oeuvre, Easy
      ( RG1243 )
    • By Drew777
      I'm a Brit. I'm also a closet Frenchman.  To cap it all, I'm happily retired in Bangkok, the city of a street food culture that's second to none. The Thais are healthy and slim. I'm just this side of alive and far from slim. Lockdown has me fantasizing about my days working in London, Paris and New York, an existence, if one could call it that, revolving around gastronomy of one kind or another. They paid me, not so very much as it happens, to do what I enjoy doing most in life. We all get to do it, but I was one of a fortunate few who made it his metier. Well all that's in the past now, but I still dream of my time in Paris when lunch was a tad short of 2-hours, little-known local bistros remained affordable until the day they were discovered by La Bible (Michelin Guide) and the students were revolting - this was the summer of '68, for heaven's sake. Someone should open bistro here in Bangkok with a table d'hote of Soupe a l'Oignon gratinee, Blanquette de Veau, a stinky Epoisses and Tarte Tatin to finsih with creme fraiche. Ah, it's back to lockdown and pad Thai. 
    • By TexasMBA02
      After batting about .500 with my previous approach to macarons, I came across Pierre Herme's base recipe online.  After two flawless batches of macarons, I've been re-energized to continue to work at mastering them.  Specifically, I want to try more of his recipes.  My conundrum is that he has, as far as I can tell, two macaron cookbooks and I don't know which one I should get.  I can't tell if one is just an updated version of the other or a reissue or what the differences really are.  I was hoping somebody had some insight.  I have searched online and haven't seen both books referenced in the same context or contrasted at all.
       
      This one appears to be older.

       
      And this one appears to be the newer of the two.

       
      Any insight would be helpful.
       
      Thanks,
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...