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VivreManger

American products available in France?

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I assume that the Monoprix on Opera has this product. It flew out of our host's frig door and broke. The French plastic is thinner than the American.

If Monoprix lacks it, I guess the choice will have to be Bon Marche across the river. Any other usggestions I should consider.

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I assume that the Monoprix on Opera has this product.  It flew out of our host's frig door and broke.  The French plastic is thinner than the American. 

If Monoprix lacks it, I guess the choice will have to be Bon Marche across the river.  Any other usggestions I should consider.

I'm pretty sure you can get Heinz ketchup everywhere.


Edited by Felice (log)

www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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I assume that the Monoprix on Opera has this product.  It flew out of our host's frig door and broke.  The French plastic is thinner than the American. 

If Monoprix lacks it, I guess the choice will have to be Bon Marche across the river.  Any other usggestions I should consider.

My Monoprix carries it; no need to look farther.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I'm moving back to France in a couple weeks, and I was wondering if I would be able to find some of my favorite things in the market. Here is a list:

1. Old Bay Seasoning

2. Guava paste or marmalade

3. Sweetened condensed milk

4. Buttermilk

5. Latin-American ingredients (Adobo, and seasonings)

Anything else that anybody cares to add to the list? I already know I will have to make my own cream cheese!! :unsure:

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Hi Chef,where in France are you going. In paris, there's a shop in the Marais, called, "Thanksgiving" that sells American products.


Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly....MFK Fisher

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1. Old Bay Seasoning

Very unlikely. Order online.

2. Guava paste or marmalade

In Carribean stores, magasins antillais, épiceries antillaises. Note that some large Asian markets (Tang frères, Exo-Store in the XIIIe, Thanh Binh on rue Lagrange, and the Wa Seng store at 18, boulevard Garibaldi) have carribean sections. So do some large French supermarkets. Look for pâte de goyave, confiture or gelée de goyave.

3. Sweetened condensed milk

All over the place (lait concentré sucré).

4. Buttermilk

Not labeled as such; look for "lait ribot" (a Breton specialty) or more simply the lait fermenté (often drank with couscous) sold in cartons in North African stores. You can also find it in supermarkets. Quite common.

5. Latin-American ingredients (Adobo, and seasonings)

Increasingly harder to find since most of the few Mexican stores in Paris closed during the last few years. You're more likely to find the odd bumpy can of jalapenos in escabeche and the horrid Old El Paso taco sauce (supermarkets) than a proper array of Latin American products. Mexi & Co (rue Dante, 5e) still has a few things. There again I would advise you to order from an online source. (For Peruvian produce see Casa Picaflor on rue Tiquetonne and there is a Colombian grocer on rue du Chemin-Vert. One tiny shop on rue du Cherche-Midi near Montparnasse and an Argentinian store on boulevard Saint-Germain near place Maubert but that's all I can think of.)

Anything else that anybody cares to add to the list?  I already know I will have to make my own cream cheese!!

Why in the world should you? There's Philadelphia at the Grande Epicerie du Bon Marché and Kiri, Saint-Moret, Mme Loic, Carré Frais, etc., in every grocery and supermarket. And fresh brillat-savarin in cheese stores. Cream cheese is surely not the thing that's missing the most from French stores.

Other things we miss is properly aged beef (our beef is not fatty enough to be aged, unfortunately some restaurateurs, even starred ones, think they can serve aged charolais and it's a disaster), decent bread flour (in retail stores; the boulangers have it but they're not always willing to sell some), dairy sour cream (why oh why? But this is easy to make at home), large fresh shrimp, etc. Good cheddar cheese is hard to find but it can be found.

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I'm going to be in Avignon, it's not exactly driving distance to Paris!!! I'm probably going to pay a fortune in shipping if I order everything online. I guess I'll have to add these things to my Christmas wishlists!! :unsure: I've found the cultures for sour cream and most cheeses online from cheese making shops. What would you consider the closest cheese to Philadelphia Cream Cheese? One that will stand up to baking, but mild enough in flavor that I can use it in many different preparations....

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What would you consider the closest cheese to Philadelphia Cream Cheese?  One that will stand up to baking, but mild enough in flavor that I can use it in many different preparations....

French chefs pâtissiers use Kiri.

Saint-Môret is a bit too sourish and Carré Frais Gervais a bit too watery.

If you find Samos 99 (an old-fashioned, rare brand), grab it, that's the real thing.

Wherever you are, just browse supermarkets carefully and check any ethnic (Asian, North African, Antillais, etc.) market there may be — there is usually at least one in each city, not mentioning specialty shops. You'll be surprised by the many interesting things you'll find. And you will also find tons of good stuff in Marseille.

Ordering online only concerns spice mixes and Latino condiments, and I believe that's worth it.


Edited by Ptipois (log)

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I make my own creme fraiche and use it instead of cheese in some dishes.


Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly....MFK Fisher

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I just came across the following website for getting American (and Irish, English and Scottish too) product in Paris. They have a fairly comprohensive website which says they have a shop in the 10th. But it appears that you can order online and I assume have things delivered.

www.epicerie-americaine.com


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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I just came across the following website for getting American (and Irish, English and Scottish too) product in Paris.  They have a fairly comprohensive website which says they have a shop in the 10th.  But it appears that you can order online and I assume have things delivered.

www.epicerie-americaine.com

Impressive - but I'm still trying to find real Jewish grated horseradish not the French creme nor the Brit Colman's which do not work in one of my recipes. Until 9/11 I schlepped over mine but I'm afraid the liquid would disqualify it as medication. Ditto for real Heinz's Chili Sauce whose "export" label makes me suspicious. And, on the same theme, I'm still importing cocktail (cashew and pea-) nuts, they seem different. But as with so many things, maybe it's just me.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I would travel to any corner of Paris to find an actual horseradish root, my weekend bloody mary isn't quite complete without it.


"When planning big social gatherings at our home, I wait until the last minute to tell my wife. I figure she is going to worry either way, so I let her worry for two days rather than two weeks."
-EW

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I would travel to any corner of Paris to find an actual horseradish root, my weekend bloody mary isn't quite complete without it.

you could grow some in a window box...we had great success that way in HK before we had a garden

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1.  Old Bay Seasoning

Very unlikely. Order online.

Hi Chef,where in France are you going. In paris, there's a shop in the Marais, called, "Thanksgiving" that sells American products.
Update: For some reason, oh yes, I was en route to lunch on the Rue St Paul, I found myself at Thanksgiving. It's wonderful and horrible at the same time; Reese's bits and Fruit Loops, but also many tins of Old Bay. I cruised it and left empty-handed; maybe someday.....
Edited by John Talbott (log)

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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For some reason, oh yes, I was en route to lunch on the Rue St Paul, I found myself at Thanksgiving.  It's wonderful and horrible at the same time; Reese's bits and Fruit Loops, but also many tins of Old Bay.  I cruised it and left empty-handed; maybe someday.....

Still didn't buy anything at Thanksgiving today. But they do have soft tortillas. David Lebovitz also indicated they're available elsewhere.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I found Pepperidge Farm chicken/turkey stuffing mix there, and cranberries in holiday season. I went there to get fixings once for a "traditional American" Thanksgiving dinner.

Thanksgiving also does Sunday brunch, but I wouldn't recommend it. My elderly French neighbors love that brunch, and also have just discovered Oreos. Sigh . . .

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As I read through the list of things western hemisphere sought in France, my immediate thought is, why not bring with you your taste memory and buy local products that most closely resemble them in flavor and texture. We've found this an extraordinary introduction to new product and, better, lovely new interpretations.


eGullet member #80.

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