Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Pineapple Vinegar


Abra
 Share

Recommended Posts

I recently picked up a bottle of pineapple vinegar. It's from Taiwan, and the only listed ingredient is Taiwan Pineapple. It does smell and taste like a tart, floral pineapple juice, in a lightly fruity way. I tossed some with stir-fried cabbage last night, and while that was decent, it was nothing special.

Who knows how to make this stuff really shine?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jason Perlow once mentioned the Puerto Rican homemade "Spicy Pineapple Vinegar", which, by the way, is made without the meat of a pineapple...it's a bonus condiment you can can concoct with just the rind. The link takes you to Daisy Martinez's "Daisy Cooks!" website for her recipe used in her PBS cooking series.

Jason mentioned in a pineapple discussion you could use it where ever you would use regular vinegar.

Its an excellent condiment for use on fried appetizers, roast pork or chicken sandwiches, grilled shrimp, steak kebabs, eggs, you name it. I got 3 jars of it going in my fridge.

You could always add spicy peppers the vinegar you have to kick it up the proverbial notch.

edited to add, according to this website, pineapple vinegar is used in some Mexican dishes.

The United Nations FAO site (Food and Agriculture Organization) mentions that you can use pineapple vinegar where ever you would us regular vinegar.

re-edited to add: DOH! Barbecue sauce! It's a natural.

I Google-stumbled across a recipe that used a homemade pineapple vingegar spooned over oysters.

The pineapple vinegar can be used in Latin American dishes calling for vinegars. The El Salvadoran dish of Curtido is basically a slaw of sorts (substitute pineapple vinegar for the white vinagar in the recipe), which you've already done.

edited yet again to add: Cochinita Pibil is a Mexican dish of marinated pork that, from the pictures I've seen, looks like it ends up as pulled pork. Some recipes for the dish include Seville oranges and pineapple vinegar but pineapple vinegar isn't the "star" of the dish, which is what you've requested. So it can be used in pork marinades...perhaps for pork chops?

Edited by Toliver (log)

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Toliver, thanks so much for all the great suggestions!  I especially like the oyster and pork ideas, since I think the fruity tartness would complement either very nicely.

You're welcome!

Sometimes following the White Rabbit down the Google hole can be fun and enlightening.

Uhm...er...yes, I do have a job and I am supposed to be working... :laugh::laugh::laugh:

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Another suggestion...

While watching "Daisy Cooks!" on PBS this weekend, she made a pot of black beans and then made Black Bean Soup from about half of the beans.

She recommended adding a splash of pineapple vinegar to your serving of the Black Bean Soup.

Which sounds like a no-brainer and makes perfect sense. I always add a splash of cider vinegar when eating Navy Bean soup. So the pineapple vinegar with the Black Bean Soup sounds like a natural pairing.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Make Philippine "bistik" (Filipino pidgin for "beefsteak").

Marinate steak cuts in some pineapple vinegar, minced garlic and soy sauce. Cut up onions in rings and saute over high heat in a pan. Take out caramelized onions out of the pan, reserve and add butter to the still hot pan. Drain the steaks and fry until half-done. Add the marinade and sauteed onions and simmer for awhile until the steaks are done. Serve over freshly cooked rice. Try to resist having a second serving.

Edited by Domestic Goddess (log)

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try making a dressing with it, then use that over bbq'd chicken (I spatchcocked it when i did it, and started in the oven), then serve with bbq'd pineapple. Did something very similar the other day, and I imagine the dressing would only add to this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another suggestion...

While watching "Daisy Cooks!" on PBS this weekend, she made a pot of black beans and then made Black Bean Soup from about half of the beans.

She recommended adding a splash of pineapple vinegar to your serving of the Black Bean Soup.

Which sounds like a no-brainer and makes perfect sense. I always add a splash of cider vinegar when eating Navy Bean soup. So the pineapple vinegar with the Black Bean Soup sounds like a natural pairing.

My Cuban mom always added a splash of vinegar to the pot of black beans toward the end of cooking. That's just how it's done. Pineapple vinegar sweetness combined with black bean earthiness/smokiness sounds like a winner to me. YUM!

Abra, do let us know how that turns out. I'm curious now that I'm having a Pavlovian moment just thinking about it. :drool:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love the bean idea. I have some Good Mother Stallards cooked up right now, but as soon as they're gone I'll do some black beans with pineapple vinegar. So, to be Cuban, a little sofrito too?

Adding some to adobo is a brilliant stroke, too! As is using some on grilled pineapple, a summer favorite of mine. Mmm, I can see a whole menu developing around this ingredient.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...