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Gumpaste 101


ChocoGrok
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The gumpaste work done by you Egulleters have been beautiful and inspiring. I am making the www.epicurious' Black Pearl Layer Cake...an intriguing mix of wasabi, black sesame, ginger, and chocolate. So I'm thinking that gumpaste cherry blossoms would sit nicely on this cake with an asian flare... not to mention give me an excuse to play with gumpaste. :raz:

I have never worked with gumpaste, so I went googling for a crash course on how to make simple flowers. Most of the hits, however, directed me to books or to workshops (tuition for some of these courses can cost $600!). My questions are:

1. Can gumpaste work be self-taught or are the techniques so complicated/difficult that they require formal coursework?

2. If instruction is needed, what is the most cost-effective way of learning gumpaste work (video, manual, online forums :raz: , etc)? Is there an authoritative book on gumpaste that I should invest $$ in?

3. There are gazillion tools out there for sugar shaping and sculpting...cutters, veiners, molds, brushes, sprays, knives, rolling pins, etc. If I wanted to put together a starter kit for me, which tools would be deemed "essential"?

I would appreciate any input. Thanks!

"The world is mud-luscious and puddle-wonderful"

- e e cummings

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The wiring work is not always obvious and it can be very helpful to have a pictorial laid out in front of you depicting how someone else solved a similar structural problem, but otherwise it's essentially just sculpting and painting. Some people are naturally good at these things and some people have to work their butts off, so whether or not it would be worth taking a class depends on which category you happen to fall into.

As far as equipment goes, you can get by with an X-Acto knife and very little else. Worry about the specialized cutters and making your own silicone molds once you start producing several elaborate pieces a week and need to get them done as quickly as possible in order to get paid.

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Wilton has this book and kit it is what I first learned with the book is very easy to understand and there are enough cutters etc. to make many types of flowers. They sell just the book or the book and cutters together.

http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.c...F363A0047978DFF

check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

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Just my .02, but I loathe wilton ANYthing! Their book is okay to get the gist of what you're doing, but the cutters are awful. Scott Clark Wooley has a great book, and I *think* there may be some tutorial stuff at nicholaslodge.com. His recipe for GP is the only one I'll use. Many others won't dry properly, etc.... I'm self-taught, but have seen several videos and have several books. Honestly, it's cheaper time-wise for me to buy them (so, maybe my opinion isn't worth squat! LOL)...

~Lisa

www.TheCakeAndTheCaterer.com

Bloomington, IN

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Thanks for the input. I would like some advice on how to bring color to the flowers. Do you use the powder kind and then apply the paint after shaping? Or tint a batch and then shape?

"The world is mud-luscious and puddle-wonderful"

- e e cummings

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You can use petal dust on the flowers, color the paste before making them, "paint" (petal dust + small amt. of vodka) the petals, or dunk the whole flower in a vodka/dust bath & twirl to remove any extra residue. Be careful with dunking, though....too long in there can soften your flowers....eek!

~Lisa

www.TheCakeAndTheCaterer.com

Bloomington, IN

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Just my .02, but I loathe wilton ANYthing!

Yeah, Wilton is pretty much cheap crap and their instructional materials don't even attempt any degree of realism that I've seen; you'll basically be making little blobs that vaguely suggest flowers if you use your imagination.

As far as coloring goes, there are no steadfast rules, but you generally want to work the same way you would with watercolors. Start out with your lightest color mixed into the base and brush the darker colors on top of that.

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I have been a pastry chef for many years. I have made cakes for many famous people so I am not speaking from no experience or knowledge. I suggested the Wilton set to someone that wanted to begin to learn and not spend a lot of money to get started. I know they are not the BEST quality but they are affordable and if you can follow written directions and photos I believe you can get a good start and later if you want to persue it further spend the money for better cutters etc. Just so you know I am not inexperienced here are some of my past photos.

http://groups.msn.com/MarilynsCakes/shoebox.msnw?albumlist=2

Edited by pastrymama (log)

check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

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I have been a pastry chef for many years.  I have made cakes for many famous people  so I am not speaking from  no experience or knowledge.  I suggested the Wilton set to someone that wanted to begin to learn and not spend a lot of money to get started.  I know they are not the BEST quality but they are affordable and if you can follow written directions and photos I believe you can get a good start and later if you want to persue it further spend the money for better cutters etc.  Just so you know I am not inexperienced here are some of my past photos.

http://groups.msn.com/MarilynsCakes/shoebox.msnw?albumlist=2

I don't agree that one should start out with the cheapest materials one can find in any discipline. If you want to learn to play a musical instrument, you will experience nothing but constant frustration if you go pick up some junky knock-off at Sears that doesn't play properly. Same applies to painting, sculpting and cooking--cut the wrong corner and you're actually costing yourself more money in the long run.

I also cannot say that any of your work looks particularly realistic. It's decorative to be sure, and I'm sure many clients would be thrilled with them as they are, but can you honestly say that anyone would be fooled into thinking that those were real flowers?

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When I first started cake decorating I took a short evening course at the local community college which really helped - before that I had never heard of gumpaste. That taught me the basics, such as needing to remove the 'cut' look of the petals and what the tools are used for. But I only learnt 1 flower and since then I am self-taught which suits me better, so if you are the kind of person who is motivated and can teach yourself from books, then do that. I like Alan Dunn's books (also with Tombi Peck).

I agree with one of the above posters who said x-acto knife is very useful, plus a ball tool for thinning the edges of petals. For cherry blossoms I would colour with non-toxic artist's pastels (chalks) as the outside has to stay white.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/42256787@N00/

"I'll just die if I don't get this recipe."
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In my opinion, whether or not one should take a class depends on what type of learner you are. I think that one could be self taught, but it may also be easier to be shown what to do in person or via pictures. Simple flowers such as cherry blossoms I think you can do on your own. Just buy a blossom cutter. You may want to tint the gumpaste first a pale color, then dust it with a darker color for dimension. I took all three Wilton courses, but when my cakes still didn't look like those I saw in Martha's magazines, I took it a step further by taking classes at ICE here in New York, as well as courses with Scott Clark Wooley. Once I mastered a few flowers, I found it easier to figure out how to do others or even follow instructions in more detailed gumpaste flower books.

Here are a sample of my flowers...

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sugarrosescottclarkwooldh3.th.jpg

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farrellanniversary012rw0.th.jpg

farrellanniversary017kr8.th.jpg

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august20050421xr.th.jpg

This is my thread that's in the demo section....

Jamerican Diva's cake link....

Hope this helps.

Diva
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As far as equipment goes, you can get by with an X-Acto knife and very little else. Worry about the specialized cutters and making your own silicone molds once you start producing several elaborate pieces a week and need to get them done as quickly as possible in order to get paid.

There's no way in the world you can get by with just an exacto knife and very little else.

Wilton is a great place to start because this equipment is not cheap. You can easily spend $100 bucks on cutters and veiners for one flower. Not to mention brushes and formers and gum paste oh my. And the tools necessary and there's lots of stuff you need.

Wilton is a great place to start. Because it is not wise to invest hundreds of dollars to determine if you even like or want to continue doing this.

Wilton cutters are nice because they have nice rounded tops that are easy on the fingers and they cut really nice. The cutting edge is beveled which is also nice. Lots of Wilton is good, folks. And the opposite is true as well.

But the WILTON gum paste kit in particular is nice because you get the whole package and some simple instruction to see if you like it.

Umm, classes or demos are very very nice.

I think the Scott Clark Wooley book is a good reference guide however it is not a good start up book.

Nic Lodge is a great teacher and he has inexpensive dvd's and stuff.

nicholaslodge.com

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There's no way in the world you can get by with just an exacto knife and very little else.

For certain orchids and lilies with complicated reproductive organs that absolutely must be molded, probably not. For most of the common flowers tackled by beginners, fancy equipment is an unnecessary crutch that will ultimately become a hinderance. I'd go so far as to say that if you cannot make do with a knife, your fingers and some ingenuity, then you're not learning so much as you are regurgitating a memorized formula. The latter approach will almost always yield symbolic representations with a paint-by-numbers/cartoony sort of aesthetic rather than realistic representations that make peoples' jaws drop, but each has its place in the world.

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The gumpaste work done by you Egulleters have been beautiful and inspiring.  I am making the www.epicurious' Black Pearl Layer Cake...an intriguing mix of wasabi, black sesame, ginger, and chocolate. So I'm thinking that gumpaste cherry blossoms would sit nicely on this cake with an asian flare... not to mention give me an excuse to play with gumpaste.  :raz:

I have never worked with gumpaste, so I went googling for a crash course on how to make simple flowers. Most of the hits, however, directed me to books or to workshops (tuition for some of these courses can cost $600!).  My questions are:

1.  Can gumpaste work be self-taught or are the techniques so complicated/difficult that they require formal coursework? 

2.  If instruction is needed, what is the most cost-effective way of learning gumpaste work (video, manual, online forums  :raz: , etc)?  Is there an authoritative book on gumpaste that I should invest $$ in?

3.  There are gazillion tools out there for sugar shaping and sculpting...cutters, veiners, molds, brushes, sprays, knives, rolling pins, etc.  If I wanted to put together a starter kit for me, which tools would be deemed "essential"?

I would appreciate any input.  Thanks!

I have been a pastry chef for many years.  I have made cakes for many famous people  so I am not speaking from  no experience or knowledge.  I suggested the Wilton set to someone that wanted to begin to learn and not spend a lot of money to get started.  I know they are not the BEST quality but they are affordable and if you can follow written directions and photos I believe you can get a good start and later if you want to persue it further spend the money for better cutters etc.  Just so you know I am not inexperienced here are some of my past photos.

http://groups.msn.com/MarilynsCakes/shoebox.msnw?albumlist=2

I don't agree that one should start out with the cheapest materials one can find in any discipline. If you want to learn to play a musical instrument, you will experience nothing but constant frustration if you go pick up some junky knock-off at Sears that doesn't play properly. Same applies to painting, sculpting and cooking--cut the wrong corner and you're actually costing yourself more money in the long run.

I also cannot say that any of your work looks particularly realistic. It's decorative to be sure, and I'm sure many clients would be thrilled with them as they are, but can you honestly say that anyone would be fooled into thinking that those were real flowers?

It is the OP's request for 'Gumpaste 101' and mild horror (that I share) of the cost of classes that prompted Pastrymama to suggest a viable solution of Wilton. Pastrymama's work is very nice and she has no need to defend her work just because she made a very useful suggestion to somone wanting to learn gum paste. The critique is out of place in this discussion.

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The gumpaste work done by you Egulleters have been beautiful and inspiring.  I am making the www.epicurious' Black Pearl Layer Cake...an intriguing mix of wasabi, black sesame, ginger, and chocolate. So I'm thinking that gumpaste cherry blossoms would sit nicely on this cake with an asian flare... not to mention give me an excuse to play with gumpaste.   :raz:

I have never worked with gumpaste, so I went googling for a crash course on how to make simple flowers. Most of the hits, however, directed me to books or to workshops (tuition for some of these courses can cost $600!).  My questions are:

1.  Can gumpaste work be self-taught or are the techniques so complicated/difficult that they require formal coursework?  

2.  If instruction is needed, what is the most cost-effective way of learning gumpaste work (video, manual, online forums  :raz: , etc)?  Is there an authoritative book on gumpaste that I should invest $$ in?

3.  There are gazillion tools out there for sugar shaping and sculpting...cutters, veiners, molds, brushes, sprays, knives, rolling pins, etc.  If I wanted to put together a starter kit for me, which tools would be deemed "essential"?

I would appreciate any input.  Thanks!

I have been a pastry chef for many years.  I have made cakes for many famous people  so I am not speaking from  no experience or knowledge.  I suggested the Wilton set to someone that wanted to begin to learn and not spend a lot of money to get started.  I know they are not the BEST quality but they are affordable and if you can follow written directions and photos I believe you can get a good start and later if you want to persue it further spend the money for better cutters etc.  Just so you know I am not inexperienced here are some of my past photos.

http://groups.msn.com/MarilynsCakes/shoebox.msnw?albumlist=2

I don't agree that one should start out with the cheapest materials one can find in any discipline. If you want to learn to play a musical instrument, you will experience nothing but constant frustration if you go pick up some junky knock-off at Sears that doesn't play properly. Same applies to painting, sculpting and cooking--cut the wrong corner and you're actually costing yourself more money in the long run.

I also cannot say that any of your work looks particularly realistic. It's decorative to be sure, and I'm sure many clients would be thrilled with them as they are, but can you honestly say that anyone would be fooled into thinking that those were real flowers?

It is the OP's request for 'Gumpaste 101' and mild horror (that I share) of the cost of classes that prompted Pastrymama to suggest a viable solution of Wilton. Pastrymama's work is very nice and she has no need to defend her work just because she made a very useful suggestion to somone wanting to learn gum paste. The critique is out of place in this discussion.

I second K8. Pastrymama's work is beautiful and I think that the Wilton gumpaste flower kit is the perfect set to start out with in order to get a taste for what gumpaste flower making is really all about since you get a nice range of shapes. It's a nice inexpensive way to see if you even are interested in learning more once you see how much effort really goes into making gumpaste flowers.

Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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The wiring work is not always obvious and it can be very helpful to have a pictorial laid out in front of you depicting how someone else solved a similar structural problem, but otherwise it's essentially just sculpting and painting. Some people are naturally good at these things and some people have to work their butts off, so whether or not it would be worth taking a class depends on which category you happen to fall into.

As far as equipment goes, you can get by with an X-Acto knife and very little else. Worry about the specialized cutters and making your own silicone molds once you start producing several elaborate pieces a week and need to get them done as quickly as possible in order to get paid.

There are no structural problems in wiring cherry blossoms or fashioning floral sprays. It's very simple.

Silicone (molds) veiners are not used to speed up the process. They are used to produce realistic blooms and leaves. In the interest of time silicone molds can be purchased as they are abundant and readily available in gum paste floral work. No need to make veiners.

Just my .02, but I loathe wilton ANYthing!

Yeah, Wilton is pretty much cheap crap and their instructional materials don't even attempt any degree of realism that I've seen; you'll basically be making little blobs that vaguely suggest flowers if you use your imagination.

As far as coloring goes, there are no steadfast rules, but you generally want to work the same way you would with watercolors. Start out with your lightest color mixed into the base and brush the darker colors on top of that.

Not even close.

I have been a pastry chef for many years.  I have made cakes for many famous people  so I am not speaking from  no experience or knowledge.  I suggested the Wilton set to someone that wanted to begin to learn and not spend a lot of money to get started.  I know they are not the BEST quality but they are affordable and if you can follow written directions and photos I believe you can get a good start and later if you want to persue it further spend the money for better cutters etc.  Just so you know I am not inexperienced here are some of my past photos.

http://groups.msn.com/MarilynsCakes/shoebox.msnw?albumlist=2

I don't agree that one should start out with the cheapest materials one can find in any discipline. If you want to learn to play a musical instrument, you will experience nothing but constant frustration if you go pick up some junky knock-off at Sears that doesn't play properly. Same applies to painting, sculpting and cooking--cut the wrong corner and you're actually costing yourself more money in the long run.

So we talking a platinum exacto?

There's no way in the world you can get by with just an exacto knife and very little else.

For certain orchids and lilies with complicated reproductive organs that absolutely must be molded, probably not. For most of the common flowers tackled by beginners, fancy equipment is an unnecessary crutch that will ultimately become a hinderance. I'd go so far as to say that if you cannot make do with a knife, your fingers and some ingenuity, then you're not learning so much as you are regurgitating a memorized formula. The latter approach will almost always yield symbolic representations with a paint-by-numbers/cartoony sort of aesthetic rather than realistic representations that make peoples' jaws drop, but each has its place in the world.

And your web address is...?

Generally message boards hold a variety of opinions.

Usually there's room for everyone's.

Imposing a higher than air standard on a simple discussion of someone wanting to learn about gumpaste cherry blossoms puts the loft in lofty.

There are two position stated here. In one, the exacto knife is king. In the next only the pricey stuff will do. Wrong and wrong.

Chocogrok wants to do some gum paste, the Wilton kit makes an excellent starter kit. It's the decorator's fingers that make the music, not the money spent or not on the equipment. But a beginner needs more than an exacto knife.

There are two camps for gum paste flower making. Sylvia Weinstock can make her stuff without cutters. I tried that and I need the cutters and veiners and tools. If you go the Sylvia route you need a Sylvia to teach you. Otherwise consider the Wilton kit at Hobby Lobby or Michael's. They do half price coupons too.

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Gee, I didn't mean to start a "is-Wilton-crap" discussion here. I just wanted to state that while Wilton would be an ok starting point for some, I personally found their cutters to be frustrating to work with. I often tell my employees that when I started out, I thought Wilton stuff was GREAT! But, now that I work more often with various products, I find the majority of their stuff to be great for the at-home baker who occasionally dabbles in cakedom. Those who have a heavier use/more experienced hand will find most of Wilton stuff frustrating. The GP kit is how I started, and thought the book was interesting. However, I thinkI needed a more visual demo/book, and found some of the Nic Lodge videos really handy. Eeeeeek! I didn't want to start a Wilton argument!

~Lisa

www.TheCakeAndTheCaterer.com

Bloomington, IN

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Lisa, for sure. My Wilton ball tool has a jagged seam down the middle. Hahaha yeah not funny. But most of them are not like that. And you are exactly correct. I agree with everything you said.

I just got some of the Nic Lodge dvd's and I really like his teaching style.

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I appreciate the diverse points of view offered by those kind enough to help out a novice play with her gumpaste. Methinks the Wilton controversy has a strong propensity of surfacing when a new kid is in town :biggrin:

Thank you for providing links to your work. Pastrymama's creations are whimsical and make me smile. I love lorinda's moth orchids. JamaicaDiva and K8, your weddingcake demos are the reason I decided to try my hand at gumpaste in the first place...I read your entries sometime last year, and periodically revisit your demos when the right-side of my brain wants a good read.

With nduran's caveats in mind, I procured a minimized "collection" of Wilton tools: flower cutter and flower tool set (includes ball tool)...and also a non-Wilton exacto knife :wink:. If i'm not too embarassed, I will post pix as I progress. I could not find petal dust...I'm hoping that colored paste, solubilized in vodka, is OK for the painting part?

Also 2 questions:

1. How does one shape stamens? Or do people use artifical stamens for their flowers?

2. How does one attach gumpaste flowers to a fondant-covered cake?

nduran, your philosophy is noted...little me had a German piano teacher and an Italian violin teacher who avidly promoted this point of view. Later on in college, I questioned why I had to spend 2 semesters learning an entire 6 steps of the Viennese waltz...that is, until I saw my ballroom dance instructor sweep across the dance floor.

"The world is mud-luscious and puddle-wonderful"

- e e cummings

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I use fake stamens that you can buy in the dollar store. I think most people use them too... As for sticking them to the cake, I use royal icing. I try to avoid having any wires or anything touch the cake, so that rules out sticking them right into the cake.

Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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  • 2 weeks later...

Happy Bunny Day everyone :biggrin:

I just got around to posting the photos of my play with gumpaste

Here are my "cherry blossoms" (sans reproductive organs :wink: ) chillin' in a plastic egg carton. I'm glad I found another way to reuse egg cartons: the cups are good for maintaining a rounded form of the flowers and I could press the gumpaste against the ridges of the cups to give the backside of the petals some ripples.

gallery_46037_4467_569945.jpg

The front dozen blossoms have already gone through a make-up session with my paintbrush. I took the picture half-way through the painting session to show the before and after. The pink-tinged white petals are looking a little tie-dyed to me. It is difficult to make the flowers look realistic, eventhough the paint does give life to tinted gumpaste.

So I made the Black Pearl Cake (front cake), but found that I liked the black-on- white look of the black seseme seeds on whipped cream. So I stenciled a longevity symbol with the black seseme seeds and made blossoms with white chocolate and a transfer sheet with a black floral scroll motif.

gallery_46037_4467_313513.jpg

You can see that the cherry blossoms are decorating the cake sitting in the back of the photo. The cake is covered with pink fondant to provide a backdrop for the blossoms. This is my first attempt at using fondant, hence the reason why the photo is taken from far away...so that one may not see the bumps in the fondant.

And here, at the risk of showing the "cellulite" :raz: , is a photo of the cake from up close. It shows the flowers, some of which are sitting comfortably in the nooks and crannies (btw, any advice on how to get rid of said nooks and crannies would be appreciated :raz: )

gallery_46037_4467_162776.jpg

Thank you everyone for your input! My friends loved the cake and were impressed by the presentation. The flowers were collected by a 4-year old girl. She started picking them off the cake as if she were in a field of daisies.

...speaking of which, I tried to glue the flowers to the fondant using royal icing. Unfortunately, the flowers did not stay very well. Do I need to decrease the amount of water in the royal icing to make a thicker glue?

Edited by ChocoGrok (log)

"The world is mud-luscious and puddle-wonderful"

- e e cummings

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ChocoGrok, those cakes look terrific! I love the patterned chocolate pieces on the black and white cake, those transfer sheets worked really well! The cherry blossoms are very beautiful, it is so cute how they were collected!

About attaching the flowers: it helps if they are light - so either make them smaller or with thinner petals, to make them lighter, especially for the side where gravity isn't your friend. Then yes, use a stiff royal icing - royal icing only has egg white and icing sugar (no water) so simply add more icing sugar until you get stiff peaks. To have no nooks/crannies in the fondant covered cake, the cake itself has to be very smooth and flat; any imperfections in the cake will show up in the fondant. You can use spackle paste (as per Toba Garrett) to smooth it out first.

Great work!

"I'll just die if I don't get this recipe."
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  • 5 months later...
....  Scott Clark Wooley has a great book, and I *think* there may be some tutorial stuff at nicholaslodge.com. His recipe for GP is the only one I'll use. Many others won't dry properly, etc....

Hi,

We would appreciate a reliable recipe for gumpaste. We would also like to know how to color gumpaste.

My wife took a class that included some gumpaste work. She was taught to color her gumpaste by adding 1 tsp. of colored fondant to 1 cup of gumaste. The resulting gumpaste did not harden even after baking in a convection oven.

It may have been the gumpaste which was purchased from those really friendly folks at New York Cake. Surprise, their customer service department has not returned our calls.

Thank you for your advice,

Tim

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....  Scott Clark Wooley has a great book, and I *think* there may be some tutorial stuff at nicholaslodge.com. His recipe for GP is the only one I'll use. Many others won't dry properly, etc....

Hi,

We would appreciate a reliable recipe for gumpaste. We would also like to know how to color gumpaste.

My wife took a class that included some gumpaste work. She was taught to color her gumpaste by adding 1 tsp. of colored fondant to 1 cup of gumaste. The resulting gumpaste did not harden even after baking in a convection oven.

It may have been the gumpaste which was purchased from those really friendly folks at New York Cake. Surprise, their customer service department has not returned our calls.

Thank you for your advice,

Tim

Tim, I unashamedly use CK's gum paste mix--you just add water. It's a fast drying gum paste mix. Scott and Nic have great formulas I can send by pm. Nic's is slower drying I think. In that you have a bit more time to work. It is a very nice formula. Umm, lots of people add tylose powder to fondant to get gum paste. I often add cornstarch to fondant for a great product I use to make lots & lots of stuff including rose petals & cut out flowers. But for roses & real full blown flowers I use CK's. Can be purchased online & at cake stores.

Gum paste is colored by using gel food color or by applying dusts. The dusts can be used as powders or be mixed with an alcohol such as lemon extract or everlcear to make a paint. The alcohol evaporates and viola. Then if desired the item can be steamed for a couple seconds to set the color. Maybe pearl dusted too before steaming. So many options.

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