Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Grand Sichuan International


Pan
 Share

Recommended Posts

tea smoked duck, that "green parrot" dish from the Seven Daughters menu, red cooking pork and chesnuts, squid kung bao style, dan dan noodles, sichuan wontons in red oil, Beef w. Spicy Peppery Sauce, ma po tofu, dry and sauteed string beans, chong qing dry and spicy chicken...

...just realized this was too late for the task. let us know what you ended up getting.

I like this menu but would substitute Kung Bao Chicken or Chicken and Baby Shrimp, to accomodate the less adventurous eaters at no loss to the more adventurous ones. I agree with the tea duck and the Sichuan wontons in red oil, but I'd also suggest the cold cucumber (for the less adventurous) and the cold turnip (for the more adventurous).

At Grand Sichuan St. Marks, there are some excellent vegetable dishes like Sweet and Sour Lotus Root, Braised Pumpkin, and Sliced Sweet Potato with Ginger and Scallion. I don't recall what vegetable dishes are available at the Midtown location.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is this the one on Lex?

It's the one on Ninth Avenue between 50th and 51st.

We had the following, all in double portions except where noted:

Sichuan pickled cabbage

Dan dan noodles

Green parrot w/ red mouth

Fresh chicken #3: shredded with spicy green pepper

Fresh chicken #8: kung bao (triple portion)

Mao's cooking #182: sour stringbeans w/ minced pork (single portion)

Twice-cooked pork, extra fatty

Pea shoots with garlic

Tea smoked duck (single portion)

An excellent meal. I would suggest, if you ever do a lunch like this, that you make your reservation for noon and get your order in right away. Starting at 12:30 and peaking at a little after 1:00, the place gets slammed and it's not possible to get a whole lot in the way of attention.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Had a impromptu meal for 10 last Saturday night at GS St. Marks:

2x Dan Dan Noodles

2x Sichuan Cold Noodles

Fried Pork Dumplings

Steamed Veggie Dumplings

2x Steamed Crystal Shrimp Dumplings

Smoked Tea Duck

Red Cooking Pork with Chestnuts

Ma Po To Fu

Sauteed Hollow Stem Vegetables with Garlic

Braised Whole Fish in Hot Bean Sauce

Gui Zhou Chicken

Eggplant with Garlic Sauce

Hunan Cured Beef

Double Cooked Pork

Despite some concessions to the spice-averse and to an overzealous dumpling lobby (not GS's strong suit), it was a truly fantastic meal--particularly the cold noodles, tea duck, ma po tofu, hollow stem veggies (a new dish for me), and the always incredible braised whole fish. It's sort of amazing how, even with the St. Marks branch's limited menu, I could have easily fed another six or eight slightly more adventurous eaters with equally exceptional dishes I was forced to leave off (soups, cold apps and little hot wok dishes for a start).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I had occasion to be in Chelsea at suppertime tonight, so I went to the 24th St./9th Av. location. The menu has changed since the last time I was there. I don't see the dishes for the Prodigal Daughter, but there is a page of "Specials" on something like the 3rd-to-last page of the menu. I ordered one of these specials: Squid with Sour String Beans. It was terrific. The string beans were cut very small, and they were crunchy but tasted pickled, or at least marinated in vinegar. There was more vegetable matter than squid, but that really didn't bother me. Only people who like very spicy food should order this dish, because you cannot avoid eating the many little bits of dried red pepper mixed in with the string beans -- but I like hot food. Also in evidence was a much smaller amount of Sichuan pepper. Some of the pieces of squid had notochords (?) that were too tough to chew up, but again, I really didn't care much. Try this dish; it tastes great!

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had occasion to be in Chelsea at suppertime tonight, so I went to the 24th St./9th Av. location. The menu has changed since the last time I was there. I don't see the dishes for the Prodigal Daughter...

I was at the same branch yesterday too. The Prodigal Daughter dishes were in our menu. We tried something off that Specials page too -- the shredded pork and pumpkin with spicy peppers, which was a little on the bland side. Everything else we had was great, though.

"If it's me and your granny on bongos, then it's a Fall gig'' -- Mark E. Smith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had occasion to be in Chelsea at suppertime tonight, so I went to the 24th St./9th Av. location. The menu has changed since the last time I was there. I don't see the dishes for the Prodigal Daughter, but there is a page of "Specials" on something like the 3rd-to-last page of the menu. I ordered one of these specials: Squid with Sour String Beans. It was terrific. The string beans were cut very small, and they were crunchy but tasted pickled, or at least marinated in vinegar. There was more vegetable matter than squid, but that really didn't bother me. Only people who like very spicy food should order this dish, because you cannot avoid eating the many little bits of dried red pepper mixed in with the string beans -- but I like hot food. Also in evidence was a much smaller amount of Sichuan pepper. Some of the pieces of squid had notochords (?) that were too tough to chew up, but again, I really didn't care much. Try this dish; it tastes great!

They make a 'mean' sour string beans with minced pork, too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had occasion to be in Chelsea at suppertime tonight, so I went to the 24th St./9th Av. location. The menu has changed since the last time I was there. I don't see the dishes for the Prodigal Daughter...

I was at the same branch yesterday too. The Prodigal Daughter dishes were in our menu. We tried something off that Specials page too -- the shredded pork and pumpkin with spicy peppers, which was a little on the bland side. Everything else we had was great, though.

Oui I was there that torrential downpour day last week and the Prodigal Daughter stuff was on the menu. How are the fresh-kill chicken dishes? And, can you order takeout off the restaurant menu?? I'd like to do that -

....because today I got some takeout

Crispy Quail - great!

Baby Bok Choy - perfect

Soup dumplings - delicious

Double-cooked pork and vegetables - didn't know pork could be this tender...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You should be able to order takeout off the restaurant menu, I think, and here's another vote for the fresh chicken dishes (I love the Gui Zhou Chicken).

I don't know what to say about the menu, except that I looked through my menu more than once and made sure no pages were sticking together. There were a few plastic sleeves with no pages in them at the end, so maybe the Prodigal Daughter menu was supposed to have been there. Anyway, no harm done.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I found a way to get good Chinese on the UWS.. In an act of sheer laziness and waist, I called the restaurant on 50th and 9th.. I told them I would pay for the delivery guys taxi.. Ordered a bunch of stuff and guy came up 30 blocks in a taxi. Not something I would do often, but it was a treat..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In an impromptu celebration of Chinese New Years, I walked through Chinatown on the way to J&R to get a new mouse, but when it started to rain again, I went home instead of going for dinner in Chinatown. I got delivery of Hunan Chicken and Sauteed Broad Beans with Sour Cabbage from Grand Sichuan St. Marks. Excellent dinner, though I should try to remember to have them hold the green peppers in the Hunan Chicken next time (my stomach is pretty intolerant to green peppers, so I removed them from the dish).

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We were in the theatre district today and decided to try the nearby GS (9th ave) for lunch. Unfortunately, it was a very disappointing meal. I had read some of your comments before but forgot the specifics. Very unfortunately, they were out of the quail dish in the Prodigal Daughter's menu. So I ordered the silken tofu with shrimp (only 5 smallish shrimps for a $12.95 dish); it had too much oyster sauce, though the bland dish needed something to flavor it. Not very memorable dish. My husband usually like Kung Po chicken but decided to stay with something milder (seems like it was a bad decision). He was going to order the whole fish but they only had talapia, not a fish we care for. So he ended up with Hunan chicken. It was somewhat flavorful, but after awhile the sauce tasted too rich (sometimes there is rich and good, but this was not the case). FInally, we ordered the soup dumplings. Big mistake! (I had not read the comments hereabout the soup dumplings before going to the restaurant earlier today). All in all, we thought the restaurant would not be one we would return to.

And yes, I remember Four FIve Six, the great Shanghai restaurant that was there in Chinatown before I left for grad school in CA. I and my Chinese friends all loved the authenticity of the food.

I believe we ordered the wrong food today, but I gather you are all into spicy food? Those may be the best dishes, but I am afraid we do not have the stomach for too much spice. I was hoping to order the dan dan noodles but we did not want to over eat with our dinner reservation for Restaurant week. Apparently, a lot of mis-steps for us! Consequently, my husband now has a negative impression of GS and does not want to return! :sad:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sorry you had a disappointing dinner, but in response to your last paragraph, I would generally advise that if you don't like hot pepper (and Sichuan pepper), you should stay away from all Sichuan-style restaurants. Stick to Cantonese/Hong Kong Style, Shanghainese, Fuzhounese, Chao Zhou, etc. There's plenty of good Chinese food to choose from in New York without seeking out a cuisine whose food tastes out of balance if they decrease the chili and whose non-Sichuan/Hunan-style dishes generally aren't going to be nearly as good as a good place that specializes in those cuisines. Yes, there are some non-spicy Sichuan-style dishes, but I don't think they're enough to build a meal around. And I don't think you missed anything by not ordering the Dan Dan Noodles, because they are firey! I like them, but I don't think you would have.

I do agree, though, that some of their dishes can be overly rich.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

True, not every restaurant is for every one. However, I am not opposed to trying anything for the first time. It is just a shame I happened to order non-signature dishes, which may not reflect the best that the restaurant may be capable of cooking up, e.g., they were out of the quail; the fish dish was made with fish we had bad experience with, etc. So my regret is that we came away so very unfulfilled from a restaurant that quite a few people have enjoyed in this discussion thread. I do not mind trying something moderately spicy for the first time and if it is well made, I can appreciate it even if the dish is spicy, rich-tasting, whatever.

It is just a shame that the less spicy dishes were not well executed. What happens when there is a party with someone who likes spicy and others with more sensitive stomachs? Perhaps it is too much to ask that the flavors be toned down and still be good? (This is not to say we do not like some spice, so to exclude this restaurant from our list based on this factor alone is a shame.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can't fault Peter Luger's because it doesn't cater to vegans.

I agree. I wouldn't order xiao long bao (a Shanghainese specialty) at a restaurant known for Sichuan cuisine.

Give GSI another chance, and this time, go for lunch when it's more likely they'll have whatever it is you want.

It's also possible their regular chef was off tonight. But I'd never order egg drop soup, wonton soup, or lo mein at Grand Sichuan. I'm figuring those are in either their "American Chinese" or "Cantonese" menus. At Grand Sichuan, only the Sichuan, Hunan (Mao's Cooking or whatever) and special menus (Dishes for the Prodigal Daughter, etc.) should be considered, with a Shanghainese soup OK as part of a larger meal. The American Chinese and Cantonese dishes are put there for the people who want the typical dishes available in every takeout place, not for those who are treating the restaurant as something special to appreciate on its own terms. Anyone who orders Typical Chinese-American Takeout Food at Grand Sichuan will have food that's of average Chinese-American Takeout Food quality.

Check out ned's and related commentary from page 2 of this thread and you'll see what I mean.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

SobaAddict, Thank you for taking the time to refer me to the previous post by Pan. As I wrote in my entry, it was a big mistake that I ordered the soup dumplings (my mind had not shifted from the shanghai to the sichan difference; also, unfortunately, I had blocked out reading about these dumplings because of the many threads I have been following).

However, my other two dishes were from the Prodigal Daughter's special menu and a Hunan dish. By the way, it was lunch time. I agree with you that I should go back and try some of the Sichuan dishes, even if spicy, if they represent the better quality cooking. I am always up for good cooking. Also, it is good to know of good restaurants near the theatre district. I generally like dan dan noodles, so I will give them a try next time I am in the area and let Pan know if they are too much! (If the flavor is good, I can still appreciate a good but spicy dish). I will also try the Kung Po with fresh chicken and see how that dish is. Of course, I will have to go minus my hubby (the one with a very sensitive stomach).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has anyone ever ordered two orders of the Kung Po chicken, one with Fresh Killed Chicken and one "regular"? I'm really curious if you could taste the difference when compared side by side, because we always order it with the fresh killed and it is very good (although I can't eat much of it, too spicy for me). But, it is so spicy, I'm wondering if you can really taste much of a difference, or is it a textural thing?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

I’m going next week for lunch with a friend. I can finally order spicy things without worry (usually I’m with my daughter and can’t).

The main reason I’m taking my friend is for the soup dumplings and the fresh chicken. I like the Au Zhou chicken, but would like to branch out. Also, I know the vegetables are supposed to be amazing. Most of the recommendations on this thread are not too current…but maybe they still are good?

I would really appreciate recommendations for a chicken dish and a vegetable dish.

Also, has anyone taken out the soup dumplings uncooked and steamed them at home?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My recommendations are all still current.

And I would recommend steering clear of the xiaolong bao (soup dumplings). Those are a Shanghainese specialty, and you're better off getting them at Shanghainese restaurants. Get the Sichuan Dumplings in Hot Oil, instead.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My recommendations are all still current.

And I would recommend steering clear of the xiaolong bao (soup dumplings). Those are a Shanghainese specialty, and you're better off getting them at Shanghainese restaurants. Get the Sichuan Dumplings in Hot Oil, instead.

OK, I'll print out your previous posts on GSI.

As for the dumplings, I know they are Shanghainese...and I have not had any others...but I think they are delicious at GSI. I my mouth waters to think of even better ones, and I do trust you. So would it be Joe's Shanghai, Moon House, New Green Bo or Yeah Shanghai Deluxe or some other one? These are the most mentioned on egullet for soup dumplings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...