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markg109

Colored Cocoa Butter

84 posts in this topic

Hi All,

I am an artist ( oil and pastels) by trade so the coloring of artisan chocolates really appeals to me. I was wondering if I could make my own colored cocoa butter using oil candy colors and cocoa butter, or is there more involved.

Also, if I add the oil candy color to white chocolate will it affect the temper?

Thanks,

Mark

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I've tried coloring cocoa butter with oil candy colors, and it works, but you end up with something that's pretty translucent. For deeper colors, you can use powdered colors instead. However, people report that it can be hard to get the powdered colors adequately blended. I've bought an assortment of colored cocoa butters from Chef Rubber and have had pretty good luck mixing them, at least to create lighter colors - I haven't tried mixing to create a new color yet.


Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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Adding the oils to already tempered white chocolate will work fine. If I have any leftover, I just reheat until about 2/3 is remelted and stir to melt the remaining. You just need to heat enough to melt. The colored white chocolate doesn't have a problem with being too translucent.

If you want to color cocoa butter with powders, you can use a palette knife to mash the powder and oil together over and over until well blended. Adding titanium powder will give more opacity.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Do you know of a place i might purchase these powders?

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Thanks Tammy,

And by the way, your adventures in starting a chocolate business, is really quite informative. Thanks for sharing.

Mark

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Thanks John,

Is Titanium powder something you can buy at a candy supply house?

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Thanks John,

Is Titanium powder something you can buy at a candy supply house?

I haven't bought it here in the states but I assume it's "findable." (Thought I didn't see it when I did a quick search). It's what we used in France - "poudre de Titan" I think...


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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look up food grade titanium dioxide. this is what makes colors opaque.

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I'm making some bride and groom moulded chocs for favours for my wedding in october and really fancied using some coloured cocoa butter. However it seems to be really difficult to get hold of in the UK and the one place I've found it only sold a selection pack for £63 - about $130 :shock:

Can anyone advise whether they have had success colouring up their own cocoa butter and if so, what colouring compounds they used to do so. Or recommend any UK sites that don't charge through the nose....


www.diariesofadomesticatedgoddess.blogspot.com

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I'm making some bride and groom moulded chocs for favours for my wedding in october and really fancied using some coloured cocoa butter. However it seems to be really difficult to get hold of in the UK and the one place I've found it only sold a selection pack for £63 - about $130  :shock:

Can anyone advise whether they have had success colouring up their own cocoa butter and if so, what colouring compounds they used to do so. Or recommend any UK sites that don't charge through the nose....

try using the Search feature (or Google). There are already many topics that discuss this very thing.

Here's one: Colored Cocoa Butter


Edited by John DePaula (log)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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What about ordering directly form PcB creation , is in France and I have ordered transfer sheets from them from the USA and I paid ( shipping and exchange included ) half of what I paid here in the States for the same transfer sheets ( pcb creations )

Their service is outstanding .If I need transfer sheets I will always order them directly from the source.

Here worth to look at .

http://www.pcb-creation.fr/2k3/html_uk/gamme_6.htm


Vanessa

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I have purchased cocoa butter colouring compounds in the UK from HB Ingredients but you have to buy quite large amounts (Vantage House sell the same products I believe).

I would be very happy to send you some small samples of the red, yellow and blue colour powders (Deco Relief brand) that I have so you can see what you would be getting. I have not used them a lot yet but they were quite easy to work with.

The home chocolate factory link sell much smaller volumes of colouring powders but these are relatively expensive for the weight you get. It all depends on how much you are going to need.

As Kerry warned in another post, mixing a good green is very difficult, so you may prefer to get your colours pre-made rather than trying to mix them from prime colours yourself.

Good Luck

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Update !

I got some solid cocoa butter which i melted and brushed lightly on the moulds. I sprinkled these with lustre dust and then piped in the chocolate.

They are a triumph and I will post some pictures when I find the camera.


www.diariesofadomesticatedgoddess.blogspot.com

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Yup, I do it all the time when making chocolate.

The previous poster's comments that using cocoa butter results in insipid colors is correct. Unless you want a translucent effect, which sometimes I do.

I use Pastry Ideale white cocoa butter (I buy at Albert Uster) and add chocolate coloring (purchased at Kerekes in Brooklyn). I've used both oil and powder colors successfully, but it does seem like a need a lot more powder color to get a deep color so I use a lot more. I'm sure there are other outlets for both of these products, but that is just where I happen to buy them due to convenience. I live near Albert Uster, and my significant other lives in Queens, so I have easy access to both retailers.

I typically melt the white cocoa butter in warm water. You don't need to melt the whole bottle if you are not adding color to the entire bottle.

I pour what I need into a shot glass or a small spice mis en place bowl. Something always microwavable, so I can heat it up if it starts to solidify. I usually mix a very small amount at a time, adding a few drops of chocolate color and using a toothpick to mix until I reach the density of color that I want.

When I am finished, I let it harden and I can store the hardened colored cocoa butter in plastic, and can heat up again when I need it.

I made the red this way for the poinsettas in these:

chocolate.jpg

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Thanks. I was very proud of them. They were very labor intensive.

The Pastry Ideale white cocoa butter already has that titanium dioxide in it. It costs about $20 a bottle. But when you mix it with color, because it already has a white base, the color comes out stronger and opaque.

I HAVE mixed color with straight cocoa butter, and with white chocolate. Mixing with straight cocoa butter gives a translucent effect. Pretty, if that is what you are going for, but it is more of a glaze effect and you will see the chocolate through the color. It will never be opaque.

I have mixed color with white chocolate. When I tried using powder, I was never able to fully incorporate the color into the white chocolate. It always stayed a little spotty. When I used an oil based (chocolate) liquid color, I had a hard time keeping the white chocolate in temper. I don't know if it was the color, or if the color made it harder to tell the chocolate was in temper, or if the color threw the chocolate out of temper and I should have started from scratch and retempered (which, for that trouble, I'll just buy white cocoa butter). But, for whatever reason, I have never been able to add color to white chocolate and mold the chocolate successfully afterward. I tried it once as a decoration over dark chocolate, and it was just a disaster. I'm still scarred from it (just kidding, but it was an ugly mess). Perhaps others have been more successful and I'm just unlucky with white chocolate, but I have had success with white cocoa butter so that's what I am sticking with.

This is what I use (although I buy it in smaller quantities from Albert Uster):

Make sure you are buying confectionery or candy color -- not just gel color. Only the candy color is good for chocolate. Take it from someone who accidentally grabbed regular gel color by accident. It ain't pretty.

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I've got the primary colours at work--that is the fat soluable powders.

On the whole it is much cheaper tomake you own colours with the powders and cocoa butter. Melt the butter, stir in the powder, let it cool completely until hard, then warm up again. Some people I know insist you have to wait 12 hrs, but I have done this many times, and it always works.

To colour the white chocoalte you can use the same technique or just add in the coloured cocoa butter.

I've never bothered with the titanium what-sis-name, I brush in coloured cocoa butter in the mold, then when dry, brush on a thin layer of white, then my mold as usual with milk or white couverture.

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Today I have been playing with different colors in preparation for Easter. I sprayed 6 trays with the same two colors--Princess Pink and yellow. I shelled half in white and half in dark. Here are the results. It makes sense that they would be different, but I am surprised at how different they are. Sorry the pix is turned--don't know how that happened.

photo-5.JPG


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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Did back the colors in either (or both) with white coca butter?

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Didn't back with white. Just shelled in white and dark. Started out just the same. Dark obviously adds a lot of blue to the colors.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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This may be a dumb question but I'll ask it anyway - was each tray sprayed in half yellow and the other half pink? Or was one tray sprayed pink and the other tray yellow? Those chocolates are amazing. I've never worked with colours and I'm hoping to get some practice at the Chocolate & Confectionery Conference in May.

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Wow, that's unbelievable! Both types look great, but I love the dark ones the most

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