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cookingwithamy

Favorite Food Blogs and Recipe Sites

331 posts in this topic

I'm assuming many of the food bloggers have seen this site that has been coming on strong lately. It's a convening place for food bloggers and has over 2000 blogs so far. Seems like nice, well thought out folks. Worth a look for anyone into the blog side of things. HERE IT IS.


Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM

A recent write-up in Dorado magazine

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This isn't a favourite – I just discovered it today – but while I wanted to share it with you all, I didn't think it warranted its own thread. KAMIKAZE COOKERY. The description from the blog reads in part:

Three geeks. Cooking. With science.

And explosions.

Described as "Top Gear with food and without that twat Clarkson" (by one of our mates, admittedly), we're putting the "fun" back into "food". Which means we're making "funood". And lots of it.

We're taking cutting-edge "molecular gastronomy" techniques and explaining them with inept cookery and sweary stick figures. We subject traditional cookery - whether that's a Gordon Ramsey recipe or irrational beliefs about "sealing meat" - to rigorous, sort-of scientific testing. And, we teach you how to cook good food. With Science.

I watched the ep where they attempt a Gordon Ramsay recipe (

, youtube part 2). It's pretty horrific. As a non-professional who does understand a lot of cooking terms, it's really eye-opening to see someone who doesn't understand the reasoning behind a lot of the steps trying to figure out what the recipe means. Like when they had to look up "ramekin" on the internet to realize "oh, he means a dish... why doesn't he just say dish?"

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

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My current favorite blogs for jump-starting the food ideas thought process and bolstering my technical knowledge are chadzilla and playing with fire and water. I also frequent Rob's (gfron1) blog, it's a lot of fun and amazing to see how much he manages to fit into a day on a continuous basis. I still love ideas in food as well but they've become a little less generous with information on how they actually do the things they do since they started teaching classes. I'm not faulting them for that, they have to make a living too, but location prohibits me taking the classes so I now turn to them more for inspiration than technical information.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Another really good blog I just found

http://neckredrecipes.blogspot.com/ 

Great, easy to follow recipes (mainly focussed on Asian cuisine).

Thank you so much for this link. I am an beginner in Chinese cooking and this site has some great recipes.

I will be absorbed for a month at least :raz:

Bill

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I found Obama Foodarama a little while and am enjoying it a lot. :smile:

Edited to make it easier to see the link.


Edited by pax (log)

“Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about!”

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Anyone within driving (or flying) distance of Montreal, or anyone in the Northeast, even, should be reading an endless banquet

- an invaluable guide to the amazing food world of Montreal. Lots of fine travel information about other places, too.


"Life itself is the proper binge" Julia Child

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Michael Laiskonis' Workbook is my ultimate go-to blog for pastry related information. It's like having a continuously expanding instructional book on the art and processes of pastry that is current and relevant to what's going on at the leading edge of fine dining pastry. Another of my favorite pastry blogs is Canelle et Vanille. It's a little more traditional and less instructional than Chef Laiskonis' blog but it's always showcasing beautiful work and tasty recipes.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Hi everyone,

Temporary unemployment has its benefits (Slowly turning into panic) of having the time to write a blog. "Shameless self promotion alert!"

It documents my travels across Europe and beyond working in chocolates and pastry in the hope of returning to Asia after this global downturn is over to start my own. It will be mainly about travel and food and am really enjoying doing it as it serves also as a record for the memories of this amazing journey.

Having just recently returned from Japan's Salon du Chocolat, Japan will be the focal point of posts in the coming weeks. After that, it will be a flashback to last year where experiences working in Spain will be recapped.

Hope it will be an interesting addition to the food blogosphere. Visit my blog, Eat That Yellow Snow here

Thanks and hope everyone enjoys it!

Cheers!

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Sorry guys, but its all in Norwegian. I have put out links to examples of my food writing, pictures and bits and pieces of this and that. For those of you that read any scandinavian language, please check it out and tell me what you think. Im new to this blogging, so please be patient.

www.christopherhaatuft.wordpress.com

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Christopher, it looks pretty good to me.

I'm surprised how much info is there for somebody who knows zero Norwegian and only a few Norwegians by reputation (without looking anything up: Dahlie, Nordbi, Ullman, Amundsden, Greig, Saarinen?). I'm sure there are some NHL hockey players I'm missing.

"Perfect flat oysters" look unusual to me, I was excited to see a really good Madeira, and the upright fisk on ice was interesting.


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Google Translate isn't perfect, but it does a surprisingly good job. Loved those oysters (and your aperitif.no article on them). Any recommendations on where to get Norwegian oysters when I'm in Oslo later this month?

Alas, though I fell in love with Bergen (and the Fisketorget and the city's eponymous soup) on my previous visit 15 years ago, we're not going to be able to make it there this trip.


Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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Thank you for checking my blog. I set it up because I have some unpublished articles, as well as a big photolibrary of food related pictures. I will be discussing food in Norway and my thoughts on the topic. I write a bi-weekly food article with recipes over a two page spread in one of Norways biggest newspaper, but sometimes I have thoughts that doesnt fit that format.

The flat oysters are ostrea edulis, the same as Belon. They are native to Norway and are just recently started to get grown commercially. The swedish are also producing the same type, some which I had for the first time yesterday. I Oslo, I know that the food store "Smart Club" has them, and also the restaurant Bagatelle have used them at times. I have sent an email to the producer and asked where they are available.

The madeira was amazing. I have never had anything like it and the smell right when it was opened was pretty intense. I smelled of aceton and paint thinner, but in a good way. The fishpicture is from the fishmarked in either Bilbao or San Sebastian.

To bad you cant make it to Bergen, I would have arranged for a nice meal at the restaurant were I work ;)

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I am really enjoying Roadfoodie's Pork Tour, now in its 4th entry. Brigit Binns is a cookbook author I know through my wife, Ellen, who has worked with her on a book project. The pork tour goes from Marfa to Upstate New York and, for those who love the other white meat, is an inspiring journey to say the least . . .


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Im wondering if it would be interesting to do the blog in two languages or if it would just make it messy and confusing. I have the idea that posts should be short and concise, so that people will still be interested, but if I only keep it in norwegian, then I exclude a big potential reader mass. Do you know of any blogs that are done in two languages at the same time? What are you guys view on this?

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Sign me up for the Shameless Self-Promotion list. My blog started in January and swiftly became a cooking blog to reflect an avocation that's becoming increasingly important to me. I'm strictly an amateur cook, but I've spent the last six months or so expanding my culinary horizons. I've chronicled those adventures at http://kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com, where I occasionally rant about politics and try to gin up a laugh or two at the same time I share some enjoyable times in my kitchen.

A lot of my inspiration comes from http://thursdaynightsmackdown.com, which is possibly the funniest food blog I've ever read.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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For those of you who are into kitchen tech, molecular gastronomy, etc., two of the foremost people in that space, Dave Arnold and Nils Noren of the French Culinary Institute (where I'm teaching a class, which is how I know about this), have just started a blog called Cooking Issues. The current post is on "live infusion" of oysters, in other words getting the oysters to eat stuff to make them taste different, before we taste them.

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Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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An email this morning noted that Gary Allen's email newsletter has been discontinued and he now has a blog: Just Served with all the attendant information previously in his newsletter and with even more content.

There are links to favorite (and very interesting) blogs and articles.

I can't recall how many great recipes I've found via his newsletter but there are a significant number. I've also read some extremely informative, intuitive and downright hilarious blogs.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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