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paulraphael

Help with Berkshire Pork

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In my effort to duplicate the orgasmic berkshire pork experiences i've had at a couple of restaurants, I finally got my hands on some. The only cut they had was loin, so I had a couple of chops cut.

They did not have the intense marbling that I've seen in pictures online, but had more than regular pork chops. I sauteed them, and thougth they were only ok. Better than your average chop, but still very lean, and nothing like the melting textures I've had before.

I want to go back and try again. My two thoughts are that maybe I need a different cut (something fattier, perhaps with more collagen) and a different cooking method (like braising).

Any ideas? My butcher said that they can get their hands on any cut of berkshire if I give them notice. I'd like something intensely flavorful and fatty with a melting texture.


Notes from the underbelly

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Ok, if you don't experience with berkshire, what about regular pork? What cuts would you recommend for a succulent braise?


Notes from the underbelly

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Ok, if you don't experience with berkshire, what about regular pork? What cuts would you recommend for a succulent braise?

Boston Butt or shoulder. Yummy! :biggrin:

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I concur with Anne on the butt (which is really a shoulder). I've also had good luck with "country style" ribs (not to be confused with spare or baby back ribs).

And, braise low and slow, and for best results, braise a day ahead of time and reheat when you're ready to eat it!


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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if you want to do the loin, ask for the piece that's closest to the blade. and get it with the ribs on. makes a really nice roast.

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I have had some bone in chops from both Preferred Meats and from Mountain View Farms that have been excellent. The Preferred chops were T-bone pork chops and some of the best I have ever had.

Here is a pic of the marbling from my MTN View chopsgallery_23125_3402_339091.jpg

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Cool, thanks. I'll see if my butcher can get some shoulder/butt (why is the shoulder called the butt??) for the next round of experiments.

I'll post the results.


Notes from the underbelly

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Cool, thanks. I'll see if my butcher can get some shoulder/butt (why is the shoulder called the butt??) for the next round of experiments.

I'll post the results.

I may be wrong, but I think it is an anatomy thing. The shoulder "butts" up against the joint.

Please post results. I love porky goodness.

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I'd like something intensely flavorful and fatty with a melting texture.

Definitely go for a shoulder, or piece of shoulder. And cook it really slowly until it reaches an internal temperature of about 195 F or the meat falls effortlessly from the bone. Then you should have fall-apart, melting, fatty, porky yumminess ... :smile::smile::smile:


One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.

Virginia Woolf

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There is also a "country style rib" which is actually shoulder.

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if you want to do the loin, ask for the piece that's closest to the blade. and get it with the ribs on. makes a really nice roast.

Agreed. I always asked for the first 6 ribs from the shoulder, and asked for the blade to be excised, so it presents similar to a center loin chop. We did double chops of these, bone-in. Beautifully marbled, deeply vascularized - almost a purple red. The only problem was one of consistent sizing, but in my mind, infinitely worth it. FWIW, I know Venison America gets this in, or used to anyway, when I asked for the spec. (standard disclaimer - no connection - just always did right by me).


-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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In my effort to duplicate the orgasmic berkshire pork experiences i've had at a couple of restaurants, I finally got my hands on some. The only cut they had was loin, so I had a couple of chops cut.

They did not have the intense marbling that I've seen in pictures online, but had more than regular pork chops. I sauteed them, and thougth they were only ok. Better than your average chop, but still very lean, and nothing like the melting textures I've had before.

I want to go back and try again. My two thoughts are that maybe I need a different cut (something fattier, perhaps with more collagen) and a different cooking method (like braising).

Any ideas? My butcher said that they can get their hands on any cut of berkshire if I give them notice. I'd like something intensely flavorful and fatty with a melting texture.

Try brining them first. We used birkshire pork at my restaurant back in CA. After a 7 hour brine, its the best pork ive ever had.... state-side at least. Just my $.02.

-Chef Johnny


John Maher
Executive Chef/Owner
The Rogue Gentlemen

Richmond, VA

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This is a braised berkshire pork shoulder, boneless. It's marinaded in orange and lime juices with spices, then after braising, the shoulder is put on a baking pan and roasted in a 475 oven for 10 minutes to crisp up the skin or fat.

gallery_6080_205_80133.jpg

gallery_6080_205_47258.jpg


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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