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Since I'm temporarily ensconced in an all-electric kitchen with a re-circulating almost non-existent exhaust, I've been cooking my salmon lately en papillote - 8 to 10 min per inch at 450 on top of a bed of lightly sauteed julienned carrots and zucchini with a splash of liquid and some small pats of butter. This cooks up wonderfully every time and minimizes the lingering smell that often accompanies stove-top cooking. I love to tear open those little packets to find the treasure.

I like to do this with a mirepoix and fennel.

I also like to press the flesh side into sesame seeds, sear and broil. Add a little hotel butter (butter whipped with lime juice and parsley) to finish.

Edited by RAHiggins1 (log)
Veni Vidi Vino - I came, I saw, I drank.
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What a clever idea, Peter!  Something like a cross between planking salmon (which I love) and parchment cooking- and it's gotta be cheaper than buying those cedar planks.  I'll have to keep my eyes open for appropriate veneers, and give this a try.

You are right - it is a cross between en papillote and cedar planking. The way to keep planking cost low is to hit the lumberyards in the autumn. Summer is over and nobody is building decks or fences so the cedar is on sale - at least around here. Veneer, however, doesn't have the same seasonal market. I've tried apple and maple veneer with good results, but any fruit tree should work.

I did monkfish in cherry here post #63.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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  • 9 months later...

I love salmon in all its forms. I regard it as one of those uberfoods, like broccoli or almonds or blueberries.

I often buy the farmed Atlantic salmon, but I'm made to feel dirty by the seachoice people. I respect their mandate but I also respect the high quality farmed product and its benefits. Until David Suzuki overpowers me during a Potlatch, I'm not changing my ways.

This guy was around four pounds:

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I poached him, then made omega three jelly:

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Served with quinoa tabbouleh:

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and again with ramen, shrimp, dashi, and steam-clean-your-donut hot peppers:

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Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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  • 2 months later...

The little bits of white stuff that appear after cooking is coagulated protein, not fat. Nothing wrong with it, but it indicates the fish might have been overcooked a tad.

Another eGulleter has posted a wonderful low temp roast salmon recipe that, so long as you remove the salmon from the oven soon enough, avoids the visible coagulation and, more importantly, produces one of the most succulent salmons you'll ever taste. It's not in RecipeGullet, and I'm having troubling finding the thread where Vadouvan posts the recipe. Nonetheless, I have it in my files, so here it is:

Mix together.

1/4 cup of Kosher or Maldon salt

1/4 cup Superfine Sugar not powdered 10x......superfine.

The zest of 2 large lemons, removed with a microplane, no other tool.

Rub your boneless salmon filets with this mixture.

About 1 tablespoon for every 8 oz of fish.

Top with one fresh bay leaf and wrap tight in plastic.

Refrigerate for 2hrs max.

Rinse of fish, dry well with lint free cotton or food grade paper towel.

Rub lightly with high quality EVOO.

Bake in a 225 degree oven till it just flakes and no white liquid (coagulated proteins) are oozing out of it yet.

I think using Maldon salt in this would be a waste of money, since what makes Maldon salt unique is not it's flavor, but it's flake/texture. Good old Diamond Brand kosher salt is my standard.

For a one-pound filet the cooking should only take about 20 minutes if fish is at room temp, about five minutes more if it's still cold from the fridge.

Although Vadouvan's preference is to use only Chinook (king) it works great with sockeye (red).

Edited by rlibkind (log)

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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As a resident of the State of Washington, I'm lucky to be close enough to Alaska to realize a steady supply of beautiful Copper River Salmon during the very short season. You can read more about the 2009 Copper River Salmon run here.

Last Saturday I barbecued some Copper River Sockeye. I started by rubbing the salmon with a mixture of McCormack’s “Grill Mates Pork Rub,” brown sugar and cayenne. I like the “Pork Rub” because it has a heavy dose of smoked paprika in the mix. In the background of this photo you see a spray bottle filled with apple juice. I’ll use the apple juice to spritz the salmon while it’s on the barbecue.

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I let the salmon marinate in the rub, wrapped and refrigerated, for about 30 minutes.

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After 30 minutes, the rub has melted into the salmon.

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The fire is charcoal with hickory. I put some applewood chips on the fire for smoke and spritzed the salmon with apple juice during cooking.

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The finished salmon after about 30 minutes of roasting/smoking. (Those white pockets of fat that you see on top of the salmon are a sign of how juicy and oily it would be on the dinner plate).

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The final dish, Wild Copper River Sockeye.

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As a resident of the State of Washington, I'm lucky to be close enough to Alaska to realize a steady supply of beautiful Copper River Salmon during the very short season. 

...

The final dish, Wild Copper River Sockeye.

gallery_41580_4407_11259.jpg

:blink: Um, I'm drooling over here, and it's pretty embarassing because I am at work.

"Life is a combination of magic and pasta." - Frederico Fellini

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I like to keep mine simple... and grilled

Option #1 is marinated in Soy Vey marinade and grilled over indrect heat on a banana leaf

Option #2 is grilling it on a cedar plank and then coating it in barbecue sauce.

Dishwasher salmon... hmmm.... http://www.salon.com/nov96/salmon961118.html

Dan

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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  • 1 month later...

Nobody has mentioned salmon on a stick!

The skewer is a good place for those small irregular cuts of salmon meat, as in what's left over after the steaks and fillets are removed. In this case, chunks of fish are skewered along with onion and bell pepper pieces then brushed with oil and fish sauce before gas-grilling. Served with the new potatoes and minty peas from my garden, grilled crusty bread, and mushroom caps containing Quebec Camembert. Cracked black pepper and flaky sea salt, of course.

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Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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