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Warmed potato chips: OMG OMG OMG!


Fat Guy
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I was at a restaurant the other day, sort of a Frenchified version of a tapas bar. (It's called Jack's Luxury Oyster Bar, aka JLOB, in New York's East Village, aka the EV.) One of the small plates on the menu is Coho salmon tartare with Cape Cod potato chips.

The accompaniment of Cape Cod potato chips sounded remarkably uninteresting to me. As much as I like Cape Cod chips (probably the best mass-market brand), I don't expect to be served them at any restaurant above the level of a sandwich shop.

But check this out: at JLOB they have a big pail of the chips, and they keep a toaster oven running all the time nearby. Not sure of the exact temperature -- maybe 375 degrees? Whenever somebody orders this dish, they take a couple of handfuls of the chips and put them on the toaster oven tray in the toaster oven to heat for about three minutes.

When they come out, they're amazing! They taste almost like they were cooked fresh right on the spot, and are certainly much better than chips straight out of the bag.

Try it. You'll be blown away.

I bet it would work just as well with any other brand of premium kettle-cooked chip.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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I was at a restaurant the other day, sort of a Frenchified version of a tapas bar. (It's called Jack's Luxury Oyster Bar, aka JLOB, in New York's East Village, aka the EV.) One of the small plates on the menu is Coho salmon tartare with Cape Cod potato chips.

The accompaniment of Cape Cod potato chips sounded remarkably uninteresting to me. As much as I like Cape Cod chips (probably the best mass-market brand), I don't expect to be served them at any restaurant above the level of a sandwich shop.

But check this out: at JLOB they have a big pail of the chips, and they keep a toaster oven running all the time nearby. Not sure of the exact temperature -- maybe 375 degrees? Whenever somebody orders this dish, they take a couple of handfuls of the chips and put them on the toaster oven tray in the toaster oven to heat for about three minutes.

When they come out, they're amazing! They taste almost like they were cooked fresh right on the spot, and are certainly much better than chips straight out of the bag.

Try it. You'll be blown away.

I bet it would work just as well with any other brand of premium kettle-cooked chip.

Not fair! I'm at work, hungry as all get out and you tease me with hot potato chips!!!!

Oh how cruel!

Edited by rconnelly (log)
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I started doing this years ago with a Penn. potato chip called Zerbies(I think). They were cooked in 100% lard. A handful of those with a sprinkling of parmesan cheese in a 350% oven for a couple of minutes and I was comatose for hours.

"the only thing we knew for sure about henry porter was that his name wasn't henry porter" : bob

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I'm guessing that they don't stay all that warm for very long but is the transformation due to a change in the oil that's inherent in the fried chip? Does it liquify a bit and remain in that state for awhilel even as the chip cools off?

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Somewhat related, but I think Doritos taste better when I zap them in the microwave for 45 seconds. I will have to try this with potato chips.

Regards,

Michael Lloyd

Mill Creek, Washington USA

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This reminds me of a "dessert" that was served about once a month at my college. It was toasted crackers with cream cheese and jelly. I was never very interested in it and to this day, I can't remember if I ever tried it.

Now I'm going to have to try warming potato chips, crackers, etc. (This might also be a good thing for Passover too. We tend to buy a lot of chips for the holiday. Not sure I can put warmed potato chips out for the seder though.)

jayne

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Oh wow, these ARE good! I'm having a plate of toaster-warmed chips right now, Kettle Brand Honey Dijon flavour -- oh-so-delicious! I usually warm up plain corn chips for a few mins but never thought to do it for potato chips.

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I sometimes make 'Irish nachos': a bed of potato chips, crumbled bacon, chopped green onions and a cheddar-ale sauce over the top. Garnish with some grated sharp cheddar and run under the broiler.

The cheddar-ale sauce is simply a rarebit sauce made with a roux, sharp cheddar and some Guinness or another nice stout or porter. Add a dash of Tabasco or cayenne pepper to taste, and you are good to go!

This gets rave reviews whenever I make it.

Regards,

Michael Lloyd

Mill Creek, Washington USA

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Warmed chips are the best! When we go camping, I'll saute some steaks in my cast iron skillet, then as my husband carves the steak, I'll quickly saute some Cape Cod chips in the steak juice. Super tasty!

S. Cue

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Thanks a lot - I should have never opened this thread! Very addictive!Read about the warmed chips last nite and already have had them twice- only had Lay's regular chips in the house, but it worked and was WONDERFUL! Esp. with the weather being kinda cool and having something to munch on that's warm.

Cheese - milk's leap toward immortality. Clifton Fadiman

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