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gap

Chocolate & confectionary Books

49 posts in this topic

Over the past few years I've managed to build up my chocolate book library but I'm interested to hear what other people have read and their thoughts on the books. To start things off, some of my better books are:

Fine Chocolates Great Experience: Jean-Pierre Wybaux

I don't think this one needs any further description. THE book for many chocolatiers although it does assume some previous knowledge.

Belgian Chocolates: Roger Geerts

Another chocolate book I love. Lots of recipes, lots of photos on finishing techniques. Can be a little hard to follow in places as it has some assumed knowledge. As an aside, Geerts has now done a DVD to accompany this book.

The Chocolate Bible: Christian Teubner

This was a great find for me. I picked it up fairly cheaply at a bookstore and it has a wealth of information. Once again, lots of pictures of finished products. On the downside, the book is not dedicated to chocolate alone - there are also cakes and biscuits etc.

Candymaking: Kendrick & Atkinson

This was my introductory book to candy and chocolate making and still serves as a great reference for me - I still use the Creamy Fondant and Soft Caramel recipes. A little cheaper than some of the books above if you are looking for an introduction to the topic.

Truffles, Candies & Confections: Carole Bloom

Not many pictures, but choc full of recipes and tips. Covers a wide variety of chocolate and confectionary recipes.

The Complete Home Confectioner: Hilary Walden

A great introductory book more for confectionary than chocolate. Simple recipes but on a wide range of recipes and recipes different to those covered in the books above.

Otherwise I'm waiting for Making Artisan Chocolates (Shotts) and Chocolates and Confections (Greweling) which seem to have been well received by the eG community judging by the posts.

So what does everyone else read/use . . . ?

(edited for typos)


Edited by gap (log)

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I'd like to add a couple more I have found useful

First eG's own Elaine Gonzalez (chocartist). Her now out of print book Chocolate Artistry is amazing, I keep finding new stuff in there all the time. Her The Art of Chocolate is also an excellent basic book.

I like the Time Life good cook series book - Candy

A Basic Course in Confectionary by Ron Lee's

Antoinette Pope - The Antoinette Pope School Candy Book

L'ecole Lenotre - Chocolate and Confisiere vol 1 and 2

Skuse's complete Confectioner

Anita Prichard's Complete Candy Cookbook

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rather expensive (but what good book isn't?)

Richemont Craft School: 'Swiss Confiseur'

-a bit old school and assumes quite a bit of knowledge as it is mostly just formulas with a tiny bit of theory. the good thing is, with each formula, there's a photograph of each candy showing how it should look when completed. i like pictures.

edited to change: Swill to Swiss!!!


Edited by alanamoana (log)

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rather expensive (but what good book isn't?)

Richemont Craft School: 'Swill Confiseur'

-a bit old school and assumes quite a bit of knowledge as it is mostly just formulas with a tiny bit of theory.  the good thing is, with each formula, there's a photograph of each candy showing how it should look when completed.  i like pictures.

:laugh::laugh::laugh: I hope you meant 'Swiss Confiseur!'


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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rather expensive (but what good book isn't?)

Richemont Craft School: 'Swill Confiseur'

-a bit old school and assumes quite a bit of knowledge as it is mostly just formulas with a tiny bit of theory.  the good thing is, with each formula, there's a photograph of each candy showing how it should look when completed.  i like pictures.

:laugh::laugh::laugh: I hope you meant 'Swiss Confiseur!'

agggghhh! i mean, some of the recipes ARE crap... :laugh::raz:

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Chocolate Obsession by Michael Recchiuti.

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Chocolate, Cocoa, and Confectionery by Bernanrd Minifie, which looks at the science behind chocolate.

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I am gonna follow the spirit of this thread and toss out any chocolate specific baking books, which I do have a few of. :rolleyes:

As hobbyists, my g/f and I are also big fans of the Recchiuti book, which you can buy in a special pack with another book for only $13 here : Amazon offer

We like it because you can make some smooth, professional-like good tasting ganaches at home. The Schotts book has fallen out of favor for multiple reasons (sorry Andrew, if you're reading this).

My personal favorite is the CIA "Chocolates & Confections" book by Greweling. I think if I could only have one book, that would be it.

The Chocolate Decorations book by Wybauw is a fun addition if you're into sculpting or just looking for something totally different, but it is somewhat focused on those who might be throwing/catering a party where you'd be doing a big presentation... and you better have a lot of time.

If you're looking to make "chocolates with that showroom finish", the eGullet thread in the Pastry & Baking forum is the place to go. :biggrin:

I think we're at the point where just practicing and experimenting teaches us the most, though it sure ain't cheap. :wacko:

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I am gonna follow the spirit of this thread and toss out any chocolate specific baking books, which I do have a few of.  :rolleyes:

As hobbyists, my g/f and I are also big fans of the Recchiuti book, which you can buy in a special pack with another book for only $13 here : Amazon offer

We like it because you can make some smooth, professional-like good tasting ganaches at home.  The Schotts book has fallen out of favor for multiple reasons (sorry Andrew, if you're reading this).

My personal favorite is the CIA "Chocolates & Confections" book by Greweling.  I think if I could only have one book, that would be it.

The Chocolate Decorations book by Wybauw is a fun addition if you're into sculpting or just looking for something totally different, but it is somewhat focused on those who might be throwing/catering a party where you'd be doing a big presentation... and you better have a lot of time. 

If you're looking to make "chocolates with that showroom finish", the eGullet thread in the Pastry & Baking forum is the place to go.  :biggrin:

I think we're at the point where just practicing and experimenting teaches us the most, though it sure ain't cheap.  :wacko:

Welcome Nyago. Your choices and mine are pretty similar I see. Have fun with your experiments - we'd love to see pictures!

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We like it because you can make some smooth, professional-like good tasting ganaches at home.   The Schotts book has fallen out of favor for multiple reasons (sorry Andrew, if you're reading this).

I agree that the Greweling book is top notch and I am currently waiting to get the Wybauw book through the local ILL to see if it warrants my spending additional money right now. (I should add that I am a novice and feel I should learn as much as I can from my current books before indulging in buying others.)

However, I am very curious to know why Schotts is out of favor. His is the first chocolate book I ever bought and although I prefer others to it, I would still like to know why he has slipped in favor.


Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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Chocolate, Cocoa, and Confectionery by Bernanrd Minifie, which looks at the science behind chocolate.

Took that one out more than a few times from the library. Lots of good information there about chocolate in general, but not for small batch chocolate making.

I've got a series of books form the FACHSCHULE RICHMOND, in Luzern (Lucerne) Switzerland, one of the books is dedicated to chocolate and confections, one to pastries, one to bread, and one solely dedicated to mistakes--that is pictures of the same recipie with descriptions of what went wrong and how to fix it.....

The Richmond chocolates and confections book is a very solid book, written back in the '80's I think. Lots of good information on ingredients (Warenkunde..) basic recipies and how to formulate them, and fairly typical Swiss stuff--heavy on the nuts and cream. Good recipies for butter ganache and caramels.

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Chocolate, Cocoa, and Confectionery by Bernanrd Minifie, which looks at the science behind chocolate.

Took that one out more than a few times from the library. Lots of good information there about chocolate in general, but not for small batch chocolate making.

I've got a series of books form the FACHSCHULE RICHMOND, in Luzern (Lucerne) Switzerland, one of the books is dedicated to chocolate and confections, one to pastries, one to bread, and one solely dedicated to mistakes--that is pictures of the same recipie with descriptions of what went wrong and how to fix it.....

The Richmond chocolates and confections book is a very solid book, written back in the '80's I think. Lots of good information on ingredients (Warenkunde..) basic recipies and how to formulate them, and fairly typical Swiss stuff--heavy on the nuts and cream. Good recipies for butter ganache and caramels.

Edward - got an ISBN on that book.

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Which book?

Sorry, the Richmond.

"Swiss Confiserie,

Pralines

Chocolate specialties

Ices

Buffet articles

Torten decoration"

NO ISBN # in the fly leaf or any oher pages

Printed 1987 by the bakery and Confectionary Craft School, Richemont, Lucerne

3rd edition 1992

Hope this helps

Bought 4 out of the 5 books in this series direct from the school in Luzern waaay back in the early '90's....

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I am ready to buy a new book! I would like recommendations. I thought about Wybauw 2 or Lenotre's 2 books. What do you think? It can be something else as well.

I have:

Greweling

Shotts

Recchuiti

Wybauw fine chocolates 1

Wybauw decoratons

The Chocolate Bible

Elaine Gonzales

The Science of Chocolate

Geerts

Candy making

Thanks!

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rather expensive (but what good book isn't?)

Richemont Craft School: 'Swill Confiseur'

-a bit old school and assumes quite a bit of knowledge as it is mostly just formulas with a tiny bit of theory. the good thing is, with each formula, there's a photograph of each candy showing how it should look when completed. i like pictures.

:laugh::laugh::laugh: I hope you meant 'Swiss Confiseur!'

agggghhh! i mean, some of the recipes ARE crap... :

0

Sorry, cannot agree....tastes change but this is a superb book when you consider it was published in 87...obviously for professionals with a lot of prior knowledge as the concept of 'career changer' is unknown to the Swiss.An apprenticeship in Switzerland is minimum 3 years...not a 3 week course at Callebaut or the french pastry school :hmmm: and a stage means working for at least 6 months with a master chocolatier not 2 weeks at the local deli making cookies and caramels..

Perhaps for that reason alone the profession is more highly regarded there than in the US where I have seen the grim work of so many 'chocolatiers' at various shops, farmers markets,delis etc. When I ask them about them about there career they proudly tell me they where previously in marketing,finance,doctor/nurses or in real estate...sorry guys, but with a few honorable exceptions it really shows...


Edited by confiseur (log)

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I am confused. :huh: Is this in response to alanamoana 2007? Or to my request for a book recommndation or both? Is this a book you are recommending me to get? I don't care if it is old or not updated, if it is good then fine. Waiting for an opinion!

Thanks

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I am confused. :huh: Is this in response to alanamoana 2007? Or to my request for a book recommndation or both? Is this a book you are recommending me to get? I don't care if it is old or not updated, if it is good then fine. Waiting for an opinion!

Thanks

Lior...

If you read the post I mentioned that this was a superb book...I really fail to see how much more I can recommend it... :wink:


Edited by confiseur (log)

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Yes of course I read the post - a few times. Just thought in comparison to Lenotre maybe both were as good. I looked it up and found one used copy on Amazon for $90. Does anyone know of another source? I guess the price is not too awful compared to other books.Thanks.

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Received a new candy cookbook today from Amazon. Field Guide to Candy: How to Identify and Make Virtually Every Candy Imaginable by Anita Chu. Quirk Books: Philadelphia, 2009. Chu also writes a blog, Desserts First.

I haven't made anything from the book yet, and although I don't really care for the physical format...the book is thick, only 4 1/2" by 6", with rounded corners...sort of like a child's toy book, it certainly seems jam-packed with every candy you have every heard of and lots that you haven't. I opened the book randomly and found a Chinese milk candy recipe which I shall certainly try soon.

One thing I love about the book is that not only does Chu provide a thorough description of each candy, she also provides a history, :wub: serving suggestions and extra notes...my kind of cookbook. I just LOVE all those extra interesting bits and bobs.

Very inexpensive and it would fit right into a Christmas stocking. I'll report back after I have made something.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I like the Hershey's 1934 Cookbook. I got this in the seventies and it is supposedly a reprint of an old Hershey's cookbook. I don't make candy, but there are a couple of good pudding recipes in there--a chocolate bread pudding with meringue that I make a lot and of course cornstarch pudding.

Actually I do make candy, but only Carnation 5-minute fudge. Real candymaking is too intimidating for me.

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Received a new candy cookbook today from Amazon. Field Guide to Candy: How to Identify and Make Virtually Every Candy Imaginable by Anita Chu. Quirk Books: Philadelphia, 2009. Chu also writes a blog, Desserts First.

I haven't made anything from the book yet, and although I don't really care for the physical format...the book is thick, only 4 1/2" by 6", with rounded corners...sort of like a child's toy book, it certainly seems jam-packed with every candy you have every heard of and lots that you haven't. I opened the book randomly and found a Chinese milk candy recipe which I shall certainly try soon.

One thing I love about the book is that not only does Chu provide a thorough description of each candy, she also provides a history, :wub: serving suggestions and extra notes...my kind of cookbook. I just LOVE all those extra interesting bits and bobs.

Very inexpensive and it would fit right into a Christmas stocking. I'll report back after I have made something.

I forgot to add yesterday that Anita Chu is PastryGirl on eG


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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Well I ordered the Swiss Confiseur and will get it by mid December. I always get so impatient once it has been ordered!! Thanks for the advice Confiseur! I wish I could have had the training that would never be poo-pooed by even the best!! Oh if I could be young again I would do everything all differently!

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Should make this list more complete by adding a classic on fudge: Lee Edwards Benning, Oh, Fudge 1990.

Add: Peter Greweling Chocolates and Confections at Home, 2010.


Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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