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Found 956 results

  1. I find most cookbooks rather hapazard in this regard, where they don't really explain why they're using specific ingredients. For a recipe with 20 ingredients, I'd like to understand the process of why they needed all 20 ingredients, and how they came up with those specific 20 ingredients. I'd like to know what would happen if I didn't use one of those ingredients, or if I substituted another ingredient. Sometimes, there might be a small blurb with the recipe that mentions that they used a specific ingredient, but then its just so completely random. I guess I'm looking for more of a theory book about this topic, and don't necessairly care about recipes. It would be great if the book started out by laying down its ideas, and then used the recipes to illustrate those concepts. So far, I've found several books that sound like they might help me in this regard: Culinary Artistry by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page The Elements of Taste by Gary Kunz Secret Ingredients: The Magical Process of Combining Flavors by Michael Roberts Kitchen Conversations by Joyce Goldstein Has anybody read these books? I'd like to get some opinions about them before I order them. Any other suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
  2. kerriar

    Greek cuisine

    Can anybody recommend a good serious food/cookery book on Greece? Ideally I'm looking for something equivalent to what Marcella Hazan does for Italy - lots of photos are not really a priority, rather someone who writes authoritatively and clearly about ingredients, recipes and the general philosophy of Greek food. Any suggestions welcome.
  3. I run a food blog called Wrightfood - http://www.mattikaarts.com/blog The Wrightfood cookbook has been in the works for quite a while now. I first came up with the idea over a year ago, and have been working on it ever since. The book is far from being done - only about 50% has been written and photographed in fact, but I wanted to get peoples opinions on the food, the photographs, the pacing of the recipes and so forth. Friends have said they love it, but then they would, they are friends. I need as many people as possible to take a look, and to let me know what they think - honestly. So, here it is. The Wrightfood cookbook. The aim of the book is not to have thousands of recipes (this, as you see it here, is about 50% of what it will contain), but rather just a handful of really well documents quality recipes. Every stage in each recipe is documented with photographs, and decent descriptions. The idea is that a new cook and pick this up, and with little practice produce the food in here. No stone is left unturned, nothing is left to guesswork. The food is simple, clean, tasty and fresh. http://www.mattikaarts.com/wrightfood/press/wrightfood.pdf - here it is. You will need Adobe reader to view it. Hope you enjoy it, and let me know what you think. The cookbook website is: http://www.mattikaarts.com/wrightfood - you can find out more about me and the book there.
  4. Mallet

    Coco

    I just stumbled upon Coco at Chapters yesterday and couldn't resist picking it up. The premise is that 10 of the world's most famous chefs (Ferran Adrià, Alain Ducasse, Alice Waters, René Redzepi, Jacky Yu, Yoshihiro Murata, Fergus Henderson, Shannon Bennett, Mario Batali, and Gordon Ramsay) each select 10 chefs who they think are making important contributions to modern gastronomy. For each of the resulting 100 chefs, there is a short blurb by the "Master" who chose them about what aspect of their cooking is exciting, a brief bio, pictures, and a sample menu + recipes. The final result is a really cool snapshot of what is going on in some of the most exciting restaurants in the world today. Has anybody else seen/bought this book? Have you cooked from it yet? Here's an eGullet friendly link Coco
  5. Sun Grease

    "El Bulli" Cookbook

    Hello everyone, does anyone have any information on where to purchase the El Bulli cookbook other than the el Bulli website? I've looked around online and found nothing, but I really would to add this book to my collection. Thanks
  6. LindaK

    Food52

    Has anyone else seen this? Amanda Hesser has started a series of weekly recipe competitions, with the winning recipes to be published in a forthcoming cookbook. Food52 What do you think of this concept? Anyone here participating?
  7. Don't know if anyone out there can help me with this. About 10 years ago I was in a used book store here in scenic central Oklahoma and there were several copies of a cookbook which, as I recall, basically glorified in a rather tongue-in-cheek way the food of the 1950s. I think the cover was done in shades of pink and black. I'm trying to locate this book and can't seem to get at a title or author. This is not aided by the fact that my memory may be faulty on the look of the cover. Does anyone have a clue what this cookbook might be? Any help would be much appreciated... Thanks, Rinsewind
  8. I'm interested in collecting books that feature good recipes for home style dishes from around the world. I have a fairly extensive collection, ranging from fairly broad Eastern European and South American books to region-specific titles such as The Illustrated Cape Malay Cookbook and Catalan Cuisine. I'm missing some, tho', and I'm looking for recommendations to fill the gaps. I'd like recommendations for ... Nordic (I have Noma, of course, but I'm after the sort of food normal people cook at home and traditional dishes) Hawaii and other Pacific islands Caribbean (all I can find at the moment are the Levi Roots books--and I'm not sure if a series of books by a very rich musician with a side line in hot sauce is what I'm after) African (I have a few African books, actually, mostly South African, and most of them are shit) Polish Indigenous Australian Irish (looking at the Coleman Andrews one at the moment--thoughts?) US--beyond New Orleans/Cajun/Creole (already have a couple of good books on that), ideally including something about the Texan/Mexican border area Mongolian Arab (think Saudi Arabia/Kuwait/Yemen as opposed to Lebanon/Syria/Israel) Croat/Serb/Bosnian Belgian Dutch Chinese Islamic Macanese
  9. Raw Tuscan Kale Salad with Chiles and Pecorino p.63 I found myself a few minutes from the Farmer's Market that was sure to have Tuscan Kale so I decided to take the plunge. The kale ($1.50) was lovely. The recipe calls for the dressing to be made separately in a bowl but I made it directly in the large bowl I was going to toss the kale in so as not to lose any bits and to even further simplify things. I did not have pecorino so I did sub a nutty asiago. After letting it rest the requisite initial 5 minutes I sampled directly from the bowl. Verdict: really good - I could have put a serious dent in the huge bowl but I wanted to give it some more resting time. An hour later I sampled again and realized that the cold had muted the flavors. After letting it come to room temp, it was even better for its rest. The recipe calls for the salad to be served with toasted bread crumbs, preferably from whole wheat or rye. I had no bread in the house, so taking a cue from her raw brussels sprouts variation I toasted a few walnuts, smashed them with my handy kitchen brick, and tossed them over for an experiment. They were mildly interesting but I preferred the simpler form. I might try it next time with the bread crumbs, or using pecorino versus the asiago, but I really like it as is.
  10. Smarmotron

    cooking with man-seed

    at one point i heard of a liquor shot recipe that used as one of its ingredients man-seed. i think you know what i am talking about. do you have any what this recip eis?
  11. Can anybody recommend any good books for chutney/relish making? Preferably something that's available in the UK - but open to looking elsewhere. Many Thanks Darryl.
  12. Supposedly coming out this year. Anyone know anything?
  13. jessicahowles

    Cooking without additives

    Hi guys, I read about some bakers (most notably Japanese ones) who don't use additives in their baking. I have heard of cases where baking soda, baking powder, gelatin and artificial flavorings are avoided. Just want to know what you guys think about it and whether it is something which is commonly practiced by other pastry chefs.
  14. I would like to begin Vietnamese cooking- I would like titles of good cookbooks, etc.
  15. Janice Wong is the chef and owner of 2am Dessert Bar in Singapore, one of the few dessert restaurants in the world. This is her first book, and involves on her plated desserts. Visually it's great, the packaging and photos are stunning. I haven't tried any recipes, but after reading some they seem consistent. My main complaint is that this book has few dishes (about 30), it has about 120 pages, and a good amount are occupied by full 2 pages photos. So overall this book is on the pricey side (about 55 US$ plus shipping), but I'm happy to have bought it. As far as I know you can buy it only through the official website: http://perfectioninimperfection.com/ and until now it went under the radar of all the press. Teo
  16. Hi all, I have been trying to locate the complete Grand Livre de Cuisine series in English. From his French website and my very limited school French I believe he has published 5 titles for the series: 1. "Classic" Cuisine 2. Desserts and Pastries 3. Mediterranean 4. Bistro and Brasserie 5. Contemporary style Apparently volumes 1 and 2 have been published but I have not been able to find any English version for volumes 3 to 5. Dropped an enquiry to Ducasse's website but no response. Does anyone know if we will ever need to go to the French original for the complete series, or will we see an English version some day? Thanks in advance and any help will be much appreciated. Regards,
  17. ChrisTaylor

    Apicius

    I'd like a copy of Apicius. I'd like an English translation and I'd prefer--really prefer--it to have no substitutes for ingredients. Or, if it does include substitutes, to also mention what the original ingredient was. I've looked at a couple of online versions and found it doesn't tell you what the original item was. What's the best and most reliable hardcopy translation?
  18. The eminent cookbook author Bernard Clayton Jr. passed away recently. From the NY Times' obituary, Clayton's Complete Book of Breads was probably one of the first "bread" books I owned. It's practically encyclopedic. As are his Complete Book of Pastry and Complete Book of Soups and Stews. Well, at least encyclopedic for their respective times. Maybe not the first books I turn to now for technique, but always good for an inspiration or two. Do you have any of his books on your shelves?
  19. With all the new cookbooks I'm sure we've received for the holidays, has anyone started throwing out/giving away/selling their books to make room? What criteria do you have for keeping or throwing away your books? I'm already beginning to look in askance at some books that were gifts, and I only have one small shelf of cookbooks. It seems obvious that you'd get rid of books you never use, but has anyone ever thrown away a copy because they've used it too much?
  20. The invasive Species Cookbook: Conservation through Gastronomy is available at www.bradfordstreetpress.com The idea of the book is to increase interest in the issue of invasive species and to reduce them in number by eating them in as many interesting ways as possible.
  21. A recent college graduate on a shoestring budget, my sister recently received a crock pot from our dear mum. I would like to supplement that gift with a decent crock pot cookbook. Are there any out there that are particularly user-friendly for a (very) unkitchen-friendly, lazy, and thrifty cook? Your help is appreciated.
  22. Cookwithlove

    Alain Passard Book

    Could anyone keep me abreast of Alain Passard's latest development , whether he publish any latest book on his new love, "Vegetable"? merci
  23. Hi - we are in the process of opening a wine and cheese shop. How the heck do I order books? We want to have a small collection (like 25 books) that we have read and would like to retail....Omnivore's Dilemma, Great American Cheese, etc...... How do we go about procuring these books at wholesale? Thanks!
  24. Sur La Table has entered the cookbook market, but instead of following Williams Sonoma's example of single subject books, they've come out with Things Cooks Love, (which is also the name of their new branded line of cooking gadgets -- I think it makes a better brand name than cookbook title, but maybe that's just me.) It's not surprising that much of the book seems to be dedicated to equipment. Not having seen the book itself, I can't say how useful it is, but it could be a good reference for the new cook. Likewise the "Global Kitchen" section, which is designed to give "comprehensive looks at the implements of global cuisines, detailed lists of essentials you’ll want in the pantry for a culinary tour, plus delicious recipes to put it all together." Regardless of the execution, it doesn't sound like something I'd get for myself, but I can see it being a nice gift if it's done well. Has anyone seen this?
  25. Has anyone seen this book yet? If so, do you have any comments about it you can share? The Praline
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