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Found 207 results

  1. SobaAddict70

    Paella

    What makes an authentic paella? Does a paella have to be cooked in a special pan? (There is one, but I can't remember the name of it at the moment.) How varied are paellas compared to risotto? What kind of image is conjured up for you when you think about or hear about paella? For me, there is paella valenciana (the traditional kind incorporating chicken, pork, shellfish and vegetables) and a vegetarian paella. I have made recipes which were a blurring of lines between paella and risotto. What are your favorite kinds and recipes? Discuss...
  2. I've never seen fresh cranberries in Spain, but then again I've never looked before... We've got a guiri gathering planned for Thanksgiving and I would like to make cranberry sauce from scratch if I can get my hands on some... Has anyone seen fresh cranberries lately at their local market? I asked around at our market (Mercado de la Cebada) and our usual fruterías and no one has them or knows what they are. I have been referring to them as arándanos agrios (trying to distinguish them from the somewhat more available blueberry/arándano)? Is there another name for them? Or is this a lost cause? Thanks! Here's a picture of the fruit in question, if that helps:
  3. I just visited BCN and went to La Boqueria and Santa Caterina. I was most impressed with Boqueria but some people have told me others are better, cheaper, more respected by locals, etc. So what's the answer? What's the best, and how do we define best?
  4. Prawncrackers

    Fresh Spanish Chorizo

    Hola egulleters! Those of you who know me know that I like to turn my hand at Charcuterie now and then. Nothing is more satisfying than breaking down a whole pig and turning it into delicious cured meats and sausages. I'm quite happy making a wide range of products but there's one thing that I just can't get right. Fresh Spanish cooking chorizo, in particular I want to try and recreate this wonderful stuff from Brindisa http://www.brindisa.com/store/fresh-chorizo-and-morcilla/all-fresh-chorizo-and-morcilla/brindisa-chorizo-picante/ They're wonderfully red, juicy and packed with deep pimenton flavour. Now when I make them I can get the flavour right but the texture is all wrong, very mealy, not at all juicy and the colour loses it's vibrancy too easily. What's the secret to them I wonder? Some kind of additive and/or food colouring? My recipe sees me mincing 2.3 kg fatty pork shoulder through a fine die, mixing with 80g pimenton, 50g salt, 30g sugar, 35g fresh garlic and stuffing into sheep casings. Here's a photo of them: I rest them overnight in the fridge before cooking with them. Maybe I should be putting some curing salt in there and hanging them for a couple of days? Does anyone have any experience making this kind of juicy fresh Spanish chorizo or even chistorra?
  5. Hi everyone, I just had to re-sign up since it's been awhile I wanted to let you all know the awesome news that I will be releasing a book at the end of the year about my time learning the charcuterie and butchery of Spain. It's called Charcutería: The Soul of Spain, and will have a foreword by James Beard award-winning chef José Andrés. The book is going to have a bunch of traditional techniques and recipes for Spanish charcuterie and pork butchery, as well as recipes and other little tricks I picked up working with the folks in the Extremaduran countryside. My photog and I just got back from visiting Spain for the photoshoot and the guys up in Asturias did a little video about it. Here's the link to the video: http://www.whereisasturias.com/?p=6602 And a link to our FB page (Lots more photos... please like!): https://www.facebook.com/charcuteriaspain?ref=ts&fref=ts Please feel free to write me if you have any requests or questions for the book--really trying to make something that my fellow meatheads and sausage nerds can get into. Ciao, jeff PS: As a little offering to my hopefully-new eGullet pals here's a sexy photo from the Jamón slicing shoot. Tatoos and meat...
  6. I'm spending a couple of days in Madrid next month, and would like to find out if there are any things - ingredients, cooking utensils, paraphernalia - that I should buy while I am there, and where these can be purchased. I known of jamon, olive oils. Thanks.
  7. Dear friends, I would like to list here clever gastronomic proposals out of the ordinary to innovate in the kitchen. As an initial example propose our own proposal of cooking our homegrown rice to make our paellas in "El Sequer de Tonica", Spain. Who said that everything is invented in the field of gastronomy. I wait for your suggestions!! Cheers,
  8. One of my most favorite dishes in all of Spanish cuisine is the humble Tortilla de Patatas. While we've had some valiant attempts at making authentic ones at home, I fail to be able to reproduce the kind of results we get at our favorite Spanish restaurants in the US and that I've had abroad. Sure, its a simple dish, but its not just the sum of its parts. Whenever we try it the eggs get overcooked, we seem to use too much olive oil, or the potatoes have the wrong texture. Or it tastes fine but the whole damn thing falls apart. Theres a good (and really funny) multimedia web site called Mundo Tortilla which I discovered a few years back (and posted originally about on CH) thats dedicated to the humble dish, but it falls short on tips and techniques for the perfect tortiila. Anybody?
  9. We've just come from 4 days in Madrid and an evening in Toledo. In Madrid we ate at Casa Salvador where my wife's oxtails were superb but I can only rate the flavor of my tripe as good, though it was cooked perfectly. I thought Barbara was going to swoon over the roasted marrow bone and beef at Sacha. She started with a fresh tomato salad in a very light balsamic vinaigrette that was perfection. I had the fried artichokes - paper thin slices of baby artichokes fried in olive oil that had the texture of potato chips but were pure artichoke flavor. I followed that with brains that were superb - lightly battered and fried, slightly crunchy on the outside, milky soft inside. Barbara had a chocolate thing for desert and she flipped. I had something akin to creme caramel, but I have no idea what it was, other than outrageously good. I think it had cielo in the name, but since I asked the maitre d' to just pick out deserts for us I'm not sure what we had. Then on Tuesday we went to David Muñoz's Diverxo. Extraordinary. And that's saying something because we got off to a really bad start. Twenty minutes to get a glass of wine ordered from the time we were seated. Then, when asked if I'd like chopsticks to which I replied in the affirmative, none ever arrived, but the food transcended all. An amuse bouche of edamame seasoned, perhaps with sumac and something else with a buttermilk-like garlic dipping sauce. Then we both had the seven course tasting menu (the other choice being the thirteen course menu). The seven courses were actually around eleven since a course would often be divided into two halves served sequentially, like the poached prawn (it was called something else) that arrived followed by the grilled, seasoned, head and body with the juices from the body drizzled over the poached tail. Somewhere in the middle were white asparagus wrapped in the skin of red mullet - actually the meal involved parts of red mullet in several of the dishes, such as a pate of red mullet liver on a thin crisp. The courses that I sort of remember include the soup served in a young coconut shell where eating the coconut meat was a desired part of the experience, a steamed roll with a quail's egg yolk barely poached on top, an extraordinary piece of tuna cheek that tasted like a sous-vide cooked short rib, and a piece of ox cheek that had been slow roasted for 112 hours, a small piece of hake served sauced accompanied by a horseradish cream and spherified lime, and a desert which I no longer remember. Very, very highly recommended. Yesterday, we made our way to Toledo, where completely by chance we went for lunch to Adolfo. It turns out that the chef, Adolfo Muñoz, is David Muñoz's uncle. And he cooks like it. Not modernist, but brilliantly. Barbara had a simple "small" salad ordered off the menu which was beautiful and then a scallops and artichokes starter with fresh baby artichokes and incredibly dense scallops barely accented with maldon salt flakes that were perfect. I had a risotto of black rice cooked with squid ink and baby calamari and manchego cheese that was off the charts followed by red partridge that was excellent, but paled in comparison to the risotto. Excellent. Now we're off to Lisbon.
  10. A friend from out of town is planning on opening a Spanish restaurant (not in NYC) He is visiting NYC next week to get a sampling of the restaurants for inspiration. I need to narrow down the options to 3 or 4 places. From random internet reading, i have the following list: Alta Casa Mono Socarrat and Nacional Boqueria Txikito Euzkadi Can anyone suggest some other places that are not to be missed? Also, please comment on these.
  11. Spanishrecipes

    Seafood Paella Recipe

    I thought my first post should be a recipe to share with you all. It is one of the most popular dishes on my website. Shopping list pinch of saffron (azafrán)1 tsp oregano or thyme (orégano o tomillo)4 cups fish or vegetable stock (caldo de pescado o verduras)2 tsp sweet smoked paprika (pimentón dulce ahumado)1 bay leaf (hoja de laurel)olive oil (aciete de oliva)1 onion (cebolla)1 red pepper (pimiento rojo)3 garlic clove (dientes de ajo)2 cups of paella rice such as 'bahía-senia' or 'bomba' (arroz bomba o bahía-senia)1 large tomato (tomate)1 large fillet of white fish such as haddock or cod (filete de pescado blanco)handful of mussels (puñado de mejillones)handful of clams (puñado de almejas)4-6 large prawns (langostinos)parsley (perejil)chives (cebollinos)freshly ground black pepper (pimienta recién molida negro)Method for Seafood Paella recipe Warm the saffron in a medium saucepan for about 30 seconds and then add 4 cups of stock, the paprika and a bay leaf. Simmer very gently. If using whole prawns, break off the heads, remove the shells and de-vein. Then add the heads to the stock (if using vegetable stock) and put the prawn bodies to one side. Tip: to prepare whole prawns, just break off the heads by twisting with your hands and then carefully pull the shells away from the belly. Once removed you will notice a thin black line along the prawn, this often contains grit and sand. Run a knife along this line and then remove the vein with the tip of the knife. Warm two tablespoons of olive oil in a paella pan and then add the very finely chopped onion, pepper, oregano and garlic. Soften for about 7-8 minutes. Tip: leave some longer strips of pepper for garnishing. Add the rice and stir well. Then grate the tomato into the rice so the flesh passes through the grater but the skin does not. Continue stirring until the rice starts to dry out. Drain the stock, add half to the rice and simmer for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, wash your clams and mussels, removing any grit and cutting off the beards. Then, add the clams, mussels and prawns to the pan, pushing down into the rice and then add half of the remaining stock and simmer for about 7 minutes. Cut the haddock fillet into small portions and fry in a splash of olive oil in a separate hot pan, skin-side down for about 4 minutes until the skin is browned and crisp. Remove and place to one side. Tip: when crisping the skin of fish, try not to move it while it is cooking as you will damage the skin. After about four minutes on a high heat you should be able to ease a palette knife under the skin and lift. Add the rest of the stock to the pan and simmer for 5 more minutes and then add the fish pieces, flesh-side down and continue to simmer for a couple more minutes until the liquid is all gone. At this point you should taste the rice and it should just be cooked. Season with pepper and then remove from the heat, cover with foil and leave to stand for 5 minutes. Finally garnish with parsley and chives and serve with bread and lemon wedges. This seafood paella recipe is perfect for sharing with friends and family and always raises a smile. Enjoy!
  12. Hi, I have one extra ticket for 41degrees in Barcelona for 14 December at 8:30pm. The restaurant, Albert Adria's place, only seats 16 people per night and the experience is supposed to be incredible. I'd love to have someone join me. http://www.41grados.es/index.php#/faq Thanks!
  13. Language will be an issue here, since I guess most of the titles considered as must have won't be available in English. Nevertheless, I think it could be interesting to find which books covering Spanish and Portuguese food at large (any topic ranging from history to recipes) do you think should be present in every serious library on the topic. Suggestions, please?
  14. Hello every one, Today, I want to share one of my favorite pastry recently: Portuguese Egg Tart. I first knew about this tart from KFC. One time, I went to our favorite KFC spot in HCMC when they were promoting these. They asked if I wanted to try. It looked so irresistible, so why not? Since then, I have been in love with this pastry. But it’s so expensive buying them from the shops, comparing to its easy-to-find ingredients and easy-to-make nature; especially now I are studying in Finland. I decide to make them myself. So here is how I make Portuguese Egg Tart. (12 mini tarts) Ingredients Tart crust 500g store-bought puff pastry Filling 150g heavy whipping cream 200g whole milk ¼ tsp. vanilla extract 60g granulated white sugar 2 whole egg + 2 egg yolk Instructions Step 1: My puff pastry is already cut into rectangles like this, 125g per, so I use 4. Roll them in to tight cylinders. Stick layers of dough up at the end of the roll using a bit of water. Step 2: Cut each cylinder into 3 smaller ones. 3 multiplies by 4 is 12, that’s how I divide mine. If yours comes in bigger or smaller size, divide them accordingly to have 12 even balls of puff pastry. Step 3: Dip every ball into a dish of flour generously. Then roll them out into a thin round sheet with the cycle side facing up, like this. Here is where my mistake happened. I should have roll these a bit thin toward the edge, leave the inner thicker because the filling will make the puff pastry crust wet while baking and make the tart more fragile that usual egg tart. Step 4: Prepare your tart pans by grease the with melted butter, or put some cupcake paper cups in, like me. This is very important because if you don’t, the tart will stick heavily to your pan. Then adjust all the crust into your tart pan, in my case, cupcake pan. Step 5: Preheat your oven to 200 degree Celsius. Prepare a rack on the last level. Step 6: Separate your eggs. Put eggs and yolks into one bowl with all the sugar. Beat them lightly with your whisk until there is no string of egg white left. Step 7: Add heavy whipping cream and milk into the egg mixture above, whisk until everything combined. Add the vanilla extract. And you are done. Originally, the filling must be made by double boiling method, meaning the egg mixture must be cooked on a heatproof bowl that stay on top of a boiling pan, until it thicken up. Then let cool to room temperature for about almost 1 hour. I decide to go shortcut on this since Bear was OK with that the last time and I do not wish to prolong my baking time further. It totally depends on you to choice how you want to do in this situation. Step 8: Pour the filling into the prepared tart pans, through a strainer. Step 8: Put the tarts into the preheated oven, last rack. Step 9: Bake them for 25 to 30 minutes or until the top of the custard caramelize a bit. During the baking time, I see my tart fillings popping up like balloons. I just did a little sneak and my egg custard like of crack on the surface. Step 10: Take the tarts out of the pan. You can enjoy them now, as they are warm, some forks prefer that. Personally, I enjoy them cool, because by then, the crust will be settled and less fragile, and the filling is more enjoyable. If you prefer mine, put them in the fridge for 30 minutes before serving. Eating these tarts are like having a Fandango dance on your tongue. The buttery flavor of puff pastry combines with the soft, rich custard. Uhhmm. My limited vocabulary cannot fully explain this. Hope you enjoy the recipe. I have some problems this time, for instant, my filling pop like balloons while being baked. Then it cracked on the surface, and my crust seem a bit too fragile after being bake. Here is its innards . How could I avoid these problems? Thank you so much in advance. Anyhow, Happy Baking! Rose,
  15. My boyfriend is heading off to Barcelona, and asked the inevitable question: 'Anything I should bring back?' My reply of 'Anything that looks delicious or interesting' didn't help much. I've never been to Spain, and have no idea of what sorts of edible/drinkable things are worth finding and bringing back. Various sites promoting Spain/Barcelona aren't that helpful, since they push what they want to sell/figure will appeal to tourists, and those aren't likely to be the most interesting or noteworthy things. We're interested in everything from low-end, mass-market items, to high-end specialties, as long as they can survive and are permitted on short-haul, EU flights (some of the more durable seasonal produce, perhaps?). Also, since my boyfriend will be spending the majority of his time at a conference, he's unlikely to have a chance to do any really intensive or out of the way hunting, unfortunately. Anyway, if you have have suggestions (things you ate there/brought back/wished you'd brought back/were given by someone who'd been there), I'd love to hear about them!
  16. So I was able to get my hands on the bones of two bellota jamon iberico legs. But being an at home chef, i dont have a stock pot that big. Will chopping it into pieces affect the stock because of the marrow? Any suggestions on using these bones? Thanks!
  17. ˙In this article from Men's Vogue, Jeffrey Steingarten says the best steak he has ever eaten was in Spain. His quest started during a trip to the basque region when he first had grilled buey or ox ( a castrated male greater than 4 years of age). His quest was later aided by two member of the eGullet Society, Pedro and Rogelio. Speaking of his meal at El Capricho: Those strong words certainly had me salivating, though I have never experienced what they had. Is there corroboration from others here? What kind of experience do people here have eating ox meat either in Spain or elsewhere? Does anyone have any particular recommendations on restaurants other than El Capricho where one can find steak this good? Any thoughts on El Capricho?
  18. Anybody know of a place in Barcelona to buy tomatillos? I've searched the markets and latino food shops to no avail.
  19. Our staff is planning an after-exams dinner / staff meeting. One of the restaurants we looked into offered sopa de pederas as a soup choice. I gathered that "stone soup" is Portugese and is made with anything that's on hand with appropriate seasonings, seafood of some sort? I need more information so we'll have some idea of what to expect. Thanks!
  20. Currently, Spain has arguably the best seafood and pork products in the Western world. Yet when it comes to how vegetables are treated, it is a sad state of affairs. What breaks my heart is that walking through the markets in Spain one is confronted by some of the best produce in the world. But what gives you wonder at the market bears little resemblance to what is served at the table—bland, textureless vegetables that have been so overcooked that might as well have come from the freezer. Salads are lackluster—some lettuce, tomatoes, a few olives and onions. No interesting lettuce variety or inventive dressing. Peas and favas are almost always stewed with sausages to the point where the vegetable retains none of it delicate flavor. The most common way of cooking spinach, swiss chard, broad beans or cabbage is to boil for 20 plus minutes until it is mushy an textureless. Then it is often sautéed in pork fat as if the goal is to extract out the flavor of the vegetable so that you can cover it up with the taste of meat. I can understand how vegetables like eggplant, peppers and artichokes may benefit from being cooked in this slow-simmered approach but why would you do this to green vegetables? Am I missing something? My experience is mainly with Cataluña and Andalusia. Maybe vegetables are treated differently in the north. Are things different in the Basque country, Galicia, Asturias, or Cantabria? How can a cuisine reach such amazing heights in terms of its treatment of seafood and meat and simultaneously be so behind the times in its treatment of vegetables?
  21. I will be in Barcelona and San Sebastian for about 10 days in late September and early October. I am a serious home cook and am interested in high end cooking classes specializing in either contemporary cooking techniques or regional specialties. Any recommendations are greatly welcomed.
  22. I just started going to the Hofmann culinary school in Barcelona and last week we did eggs. One of the ways we prepared the eggs was to basically poach them in hot oil, in other words, we deep-fried them. The chef instructor said that this was the way that grandmothers do it but I don't remember my grandmother (or anyone else for that matter) frying an egg like that! Everyone else in the class seemed to think it was a fairly normal thing to do. I'm American though so maybe this is something unique to Spain? Has anyone ever seen this done in the US? I'm not talking about just frying the egg in a lot of oil- I'm talking about literally dropping the egg into a saucepan FILLED with super hot oil. It tasted great in the end by the way!
  23. Hello everybody. This is my first post and the reason why I stumbled upon this wonderful site. Since I tried jamon iberico bellota I have been hooked to it. Since I can't buy it locally where I live, I have to get it online. While searching online, I found this on ebay: http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/JAMON-IBERICO-100-EXTREMADURA-BELLOTA-8KG-PATA-NEGRA-/230519034723?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_186&hash=item35ac015363 This is 176 euros for 8kgr jamon including P&P to Greece. This is almost half price from all the other online retailers like http://www.ibergour.co.uk/en/productos/ficha_producto.html?id_prod=jmcex who sell for 350 euros for 7 kilos including P&P. How can there be such a big price difference? Is it because the ebay one is direct from the manufacturer? Is this price possible? Or is there any kind of scam involved? Anyone who lives in Spain close to the manufacturing regions can confirm these prices possible?
  24. Just picked up two interesting-looking bottles of Anis Liqueur from Spain called "Chinchon", one labeled "Dulce" (sweet) and bottled at 70 proof, the other "Seco" (dry) at 86 proof. Anyone ever heard of this stuff and/or tried it? I suppose I'm feeling sorry for myself for missing out on the last bottles of White Label Ojen sold in the last year or so at Martin Wine Cellar in New Orleans, and I'm looking for something a bit closer to Ojen than, say, MB Anisette (not that there's anything wrong with MB Anisette) for use in Ojen Frappes....
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