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Found 459 results

  1. bimbojones

    Making Fresh Masa

    Having recently moved to British Columbia from Los Angeles I'm sorely missing my fresh Mexican ingredients...mainly fresh masa both for tortillas and tamales. Does anyone have a recipe for home made masa dough? If I can replicate my beloved masa, I'm willing to give it a shot! Many thanks!
  2. jsmeeker

    Tacos--Cook-Off 39

    Welcome to the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off! Click here for the Cook-Off index. A couple of days ago, we were trying to figure out a good cook-off topic for late April/early May, and someone suggested tacos. Shortly thereafter, Mark Bittman of the New York Times decided to weigh in with this article, titled "Sunday Morning, Yucatán:" Bittman shares three recipes, as well, for Taco Filling With Poblano Strips and Potatoes, Mushroom Taco Filling, and Nopales Filling. Meanwhile, over at Bon Appetit, Steven Raichlen writes about the food of the Yucatan, including, naturally, tacos. Finally, someone pointed out that the 5th of May was coming -- you know, Cinco de Mayo. So tacos it is: soft or hard, corn or flour, meat, fish, or veg. As always, we've got a few topics to get us started, including these on tacos al pastor, how to create a DIY taco stand, cabbage in tacos, and fish tacos. There are also tortilla recipes here and a reheating tortillas discussion here. From cheap on the low-down to gussied-up, tacos run the gamut. What are your go-to recipes? Any that you've been dying to try? You can do better than a big fast food chain place, even if you want that ground beef Tex-Mex style of taco. Let's get cooking.
  3. ProfessionalHobbit

    Californios

    I had completely forgotten about our dinner there in December. Anyone who is a serious eater here on eGullet needs to come here soon. Highly recommended. @MetsFan5 - here is one place you might love over Gary Danko. You too @rancho_gordo. I'll let the pix speak for themselves... Horchata - Koshihikari rice, almonds, black cardamom, cinnamon. Scallop chicharrón, scallop ceviche, crème fraîche. Jicama empanada, shiso, pumpkin, salmon roe. Smoked mushroom taco with pickled wild mushrooms. Dungeness crab tostada, sour orange segments, sour orange-habanero salsa, Castelfranco radicchio, tarragon. Pineapple guava sorbet Fuyu persimmon, habanero honey, tarragon Tasmanian trout ceviche, dashi, Granny Smith apple Aguachile, parsnip, red bell pepper Black bean tamales steamed in banana leaves, with salsa on the side Smoked squab broth, pomegranate seeds, cilantro flowers Tres frijoles with sturgeon caviar, shallots and edible gold leaf Black cod, salsa verde, green grapes Wagyu beef, pickled onion Smoked squab breast served with spiced cranberry sauce, quince simmered in cranberry juice, pickled Japanese turnips and charred scallion, and sourdough flour tortillas Yes, it's the same squab from which the broth was made. And now the desserts: Foie gras churro, with foie gras mousse, cinnamon sugar, served with hot milk chocolate infused with cinnamon, Lustau sherry and coffee. By the time I remembered to take a pic, I'd eaten half of the churro. Dunk the churro into the chocolate. Dulce de leche spooned atop pear sorbet with chunks of Asian pear, macadamia nut butter Pecan ice cream, candied pecans, shortbread cookie, apples, clarified butter The cookie was on top of the apples. Break the cookie and spoon everything over. Cherry extract digestif, vermouth, sweet Mexican lime We'll definitely return. I'm an instant fan. Prepaid tix were $230 per person, plus there were additional charges due to wine pairings. It's worth every cent you'll spend. Californios 3115 22nd Street (South Van Ness) Mission District
  4. snowangel

    Carnitas

    Anyone have any great recipes for making pork carnitas?
  5. AlainV

    Making Tortillas at Home

    I am looking for a T&T recipe for Flour tortillas as well as the way to cook them without special equipment (in a simple pan). Is it possible to make the dough with a stand mixer or a food processor ? Help welcomed
  6. The Blissful Glutton

    Making Mexican at home

    When I was growing up in Atlanta, my parents--both were born in raised in Mexico City--were definitely out of their element. All of their family was still in Mexico and their only consolation was visits from my Grandmothers, who would sneak all sorts of hard-to-find Mexican goodies like Churrumais, Mexican candies, and homemade quesadillas--think of an enclosed quesadillas made with masa and variety of fillings like cheese, huitlacoche, refried beans, etc. The quesadillas were always my favorite and I learned how to make them as a young girl. My sister and I still make them to this day--especially for large parties because they are always a hit and very simple to prepare. I get a lot of questions from people about these thinking they are empanadas, but I grew up calling them quesadillas and the stores I frequent in D.F. call them quesadillas as well. I asked a local chef when I was in Cabo and he told me that the nomenclature is a matter of which region they are in. It warrants more research. Does anyone else make these out there? What do you call them? But, back to making the quesadillas. I coaxed my lovely sister into 'modeling' for me as we prepared a plain cheese version for our guests on the 4th of July. I have to warn you in advance, we ate them so quickly there is no requisite gooey cheese oozing out of the crisp crust shot. But, hopefully you'll get the idea. How I do it: Before making the masa, I grate a round of Oaxaca cheese and set aside. Making the masa is very easy. I normally use fresh masa I get ground to order at a local store (Chicago on Buford Highway for all you Atlantans), but we just went with Maseca because we were short on time. Just follow the direction on the package. I like to add a bit of salt. Here is my sister kneading the dough. Make sure it does not get too dry. After kneading the dough, divide the dough into balls a little smaller than a golf ball. I then press the balls out into a thick tortilla using plastic wrap. You can also use a cut up plastic freezer bag or wax paper. After taking the tortillas in the press, fill with grated cheese and whatever else you'd like to add--the possibilities are endless. Fold in half and seal the edges very well so the fillings don't come out during frying. After ensuring the quesadillas are well-sealed, fry them in oil until they turn a very light brown, but not cooked all the way. Take them out of oil and drain on paper towels. I like to do this before company comes to save time. You can also freeze them at this point. To finish and enjoy, fry again and top with some killer salsa and crema Mexicana.
  7. SNewman004

    Scratch Guacamole - Labor Intensive

    'Our menu is based on Mexican and Latin American flavors, therefor we can't not have fresh guacamole. We fly through the stuff!! One recipe uses 72 avocados which yields about 20 quarts of guacamole. We go through this amount almost every day. On top of having someone (or a couple of) people pressing fresh tortillas, we are spending a lot of time on this menu item. I can't think of any way to make the guacamole less labor intensive without sacrificing the quality. I have considered table side, or to-order made guac. Any thoughts or ideas? Thanks!
  8. SNewman004

    Manual Tortilla Machines

    I'm wondering if anyone has any experience with a manual tortilla machine / maker. I am not talking about a tortilla press. This machine basically takes a batch of masa dough that is placed on top, through a roller with a cutter, using a hand crank. The machine will flatten and cut uniform size tortillas. I've been looking at the Monarca brand. The reviews seem to be below average. I'm trying to find ways to shave some labor dollars without sacrificing quality. Our restaurant goes through an average of 300 to 500 tortillas a day depending on business. Thanks for your help!
  9. SNewman004

    Mississippi Delta Tamales

    What is the best way to execute tamales as an appetizer in a restaurant? I'm looking at 7-10 minute ticket time. I can only think of pre-steaming the tamales and steaming or simmering in sauce to order. Does anyone have any experience with these in the professional kitchen?
  10. I am having trouble getting my poblano to keep its shape. I have charred the outside over a flame, then breaded with Panko and deep fried. I then cut open one side and stuff with the filling, cover with fundito and toast the top. It tastes amazing but looks terrible on the plate. Help!
  11. Alchemist

    Horchata

    Have recently enjoyed horchata on the streets of PV. Got a recipe for original horchata and any variations?
  12. Chiles en Nogada are traditionally served only for Mexican Independence Day (16 de Septiembre). Every household and restaurant have their own version. In years past we have eaten as many as 12 different versions in the course of the week long celebration. Certain things about it never change: always poblanos, walnuts, pomegranate seeds and dried fruit (though the types of dried and fresh fruit vary as does the ratio of fruit to meat). And the cream sauce is always room temperature, never heated. Not only is it a tasty dish, it is about the prettiest meal ever put on a plate. I have made them at home (but not for several years). Rick Bayless's recipe is the one I used. http://www.rickbayless.com/recipe/pork-and-fruit-stuffed-chiles-in-white-walnut-sauce/ The history of the dish is one of creating a festive dish on the spur of the moment with limited ingredients. https://www.tripsavvy.com/chiles-en-nogada-1588803
  13. I was catching up on my blog reading, and hit a post about icebox cakes. I've only ever made one icebox cake in my life, and it was delicious, using the classic chocolate wafers and whipped cream but flavored with Red Bird peppermint puffs. (I got the recipe from an article about the company that makes the candy.) Anyway, while the blog post itself was interesting, the first comment (at least as I currently see it) caught my attention, because it described a Mexican icebox cake that looked very different to me because it didn't use whipped cream. The commenter called this icebox cake a carlota de limón, and described it as being made from maria cookies, lime juice, and sweetened condensed milk. I adore limes! So...I can find recipes on line, but has anyone made this cake before? Do you have a tried-and-true recipe that you'd be willing to share? Please? Thanks!
  14. Kasia

    Quesadilla

    My quesadilla Today I would like to share with you the recipe for a dish which meets holiday requirements. It is easy, and it doesn't need sophisticated ingredients or an oven. A frying pan is enough. Quesadilla, the dish in question, is a tortilla with melted cheese. The rest of the ingredients you choose at your discretion. Red beans, pepper, chorizo or fried meat all work brilliantly. I added fried pieces of turkey leg. Thanks to this, my dish could be a holiday dinner. Ingredients (for 2 people) 4 tortillas 300g of turkey leg half a chili pepper half an onion 1 clove of garlic 2 tablespoons of oil 200g of tinned sweetcorn 200g of tinned red beans fresh pepper 200g of mozzarella cheese salt and pepper Cube the meat. Fry the diced onion, garlic and chili pepper in oil. Add the spiced-up-with-salt-and-pepper meat and fry on a low heat until the meat is soft. Cube the pepper. Drain the sweetcorn and red beans and slice the mozzarella cheese. Put the tortilla into a dry, heated pan. Arrange the meat, sweetcorn and red beans on it. Cover with the slices of the mozzarella cheese and the second tortilla. Fry on a low heat for a while. Turn it and fry a bit more until the cheese has melted. Put it on a plate and cut it into triangles. Enjoy your meal!
  15. I'm doing an aphrodisiac meal for Valentines Day and someone recently mentioned this liquor to me, but I've never heard of it. Can someone fill me in. I hear its orange and sweet. Can I get more details than that? Thanks
  16. Chris Hennes

    Types of Mexican Chorizo

    This morning I started writing the WikiGullet article on Chorizo, so naturally turned to Diana Kennedy's books for information about Mexican chorizo. To my surprise, it's not at all what I expected! I have eaten and made many Mexican chorizos, all of which followed the same basic formula of being flavored primarily by chiles: so when I came across Chorizo Verde I was a little shocked! It all makes me wonder: what other sorts of "Chorizo" exist in Mexican cuisine that I have never heard of? Presumably there are a zillion regional variants?
  17. SNewman004

    Chorizo Burger Temp

    Thinking about putting a chorizo burger on the menu. It would most likely be a 50/50 blend of chorizo and ground chuck. I'm thinking this means I can't do a mid rare burger? Anyone have any experience with this?
  18. Hey all, What awesome cookware can I get during a visit to Mexico City? I'm not really so keen on clay pottery so what else is there? I'm quite keen on getting a cast iron Comal but not sure what else to look for. Any ideas would be most appreciated. Already have a great tortilla press and lime juicer.
  19. Chris Amirault

    Pozole/Hominy

    Just wanted to see if I could find out about how people use their pozole. I have been using Goya white hominy for our pozole soup for a while, but decided to try to use reconstituted dried pozole. It looked like an utterly different thing. Then I went to Racho Gordo and their pozole looks like yet another utterly different thing. So... anyone smarter than me care to share? Thanks! Edited to add: Specifically, if people can talk about how they reconstitute dried pozole, and how it compares to the canned stuff, I'd appreciate it.
  20. There are instructions and videos on how to char, blister,roast the chiles; how to peel the skin off...but nothing explains how to get all those blankety-blank seeds off that top knobby thing through a simple slit without ripping the entire chile open. The only demonstration which I could find on actually getting out the seeds ripped the chile to shreds almost and the lady chef ended up by saying...and now you can stuff the chile with anything you like. I looked at the remnants of what was a beautiful green Poblano and wondered how on earth you could 'stuff' it with anything. How do YOU get the seeds out of the slit open chile?
  21. A friend gifted me a book written by someone I know of but only loosely. The acquaintance is a former missionary who has lived in Oaxaca for 15 years and co-authored this book with Susana Trilling (famous Oaxacan cooking instructor). The book is self published and really surprised me with its quality. The whole thesis is saving the indigenous foods of the area and combatting GMO infiltration of the area. Those of you who know the area might know of one of my hero restaurants - the like-minded Itanoni in Oaxaca City - surely they all travel in the same circles. Recipes are average fare - not fancy - clearly recipes from regular local folk, but very authentic, not fusion. They start with basic fresh masa, run you through all sorts of things including molé and salads and end up with stuff like yucca and egg tacos. The chapters include: Wild Greens (purslane, amaranth, etc), Beans & Squash, Salsa, Nopal and Maguey, Food and Fiesta, Medicinal uses. About 300 pages in all (so figure 150 in English and 150 in Spanish). This book is not available through Amazon. It is bilingual. I highly recommend it. Side note: Quite frankly these guys are goofs. They don't know how important and well produced this book is and aren't marketing it worth crap. Go buy it. Tell them I sent you. And enjoy this book. HERE
  22. Over in the Cooking with "Eat Mexico" topic I've posted a about things I've made from Lesley Téllez's recently-published book about street food in Mexico City. I finally had time to go down to "CDMX" (as they are now trying to rebrand themselves) this weekend and went on two of the Eat Mexico food tours. On Friday we went on the street food tour, and on Saturday on the San Juan market tour. The pope was also in town this weekend which made the city crazier than usual and drove the tour selections as we tried to not be where he was, with limited success. Street Food Tour I have limited photos of this one because our hands were usually full! There are ten "normal" stops on the tour plus a couple of optional ones. One of the vendors was closed for the day, but we definitely had no shortage of food. I think the tour lasted something like four hours, and we were basically eating the whole time. Most of it was standing and walking, but we did stop into a local coffee shop and sit down for a short time. Our guide, Arturo, was excellent. He is from the city, has attended culinary school, and is very well versed in both the local street food culture as well as Mexican cuisine overall. While the tour was mostly eating, we did walk through one small neighborhood market just to get the feel for the thing, and we stopped at one local tortilleria: The classic tortilla-delivery vehicle: We chatted up a local store owner who was making "antojitos" ("little cravings") for breakfast: Ate some tamales, walked a bit, then had some tlacoyos: here are the condiments... We also had some fresh juices. They really like their pseudo-medicinal juices.. we had the one that was "anti-flu" (and delicious): For the tlacoyos I had a huitlacoche and my wife has the chicken tinga. The huitlacoche was disappointingly non-descript. The remedy, of course, was to douse it in salsa, which fixes everything. A few blocks down we had carnitas tacos: And then some mango and watermelon with chile powder: Arturo tried to ply us with more food at the nearby burreria, but at this point we were on the verge of exploding: So we stopped for some locally-roasted coffee: Then on to a burrito place (of all things!) -- the guy running the burrito place was hilarious, and totally frank about stealing the burrito thing from Texas and then "fixing it." He's had the stand for something like 20 years. We split a squash blossom burrito (squash blossoms, onions, salsa, and cheese are the only ingredients, no rice or beans) which he makes on the griddle and then covers in a cheese blend and fries until the cheese browns and crisps. Definitely an improved burrito! Yeah, no photos there. Second to last was an absolutely terrific octopus tostada: And then a final stop for dessert (which we took back to the hotel rather than eating it there): ETA: A couple more photos. Also, there was a turkey and pork sandwich of some kind that I have no photos of and can't quite remember where it fit into the tour. Just in case you were worried about us starving.
  23. The February issue of Sunset Magazine has a great article about the beans of Mexico. And guess who is featured.....our own Steve Sando. Nice write up and lots and lots of recipes. I have been a Sunset subscriber for more than 25 years and I finally :"know" someone in it. Cool Beans as they say. I hope someone with more skills than I have can post a link.
  24. cyalexa

    Salsa Para Enchiladas

    Salsa Para Enchiladas 3 ancho chiles 2 New Mexico chiles 2 chipotle chiles 1 clove garlic, sliced 2 TB flour 2 TB vegetable oil 1 tsp vinegar ¾ tsp salt ¼ tsp dried oregano 2 cups broth, stock, or (filtered) chili soaking liquid Rinse, stem and seed chiles. Place in saucepan and cover with water. Bring to boil. Cover and remove from heat and let soften and cool. While the chiles are cooling, gently sauté garlic slices in oil until they are soft and golden brown. Remove the garlic from the oil, with a slotted spoon and reserve. Make a light roux by adding the flour to the oil and sautéing briefly. Drain the chilies and puree them with the garlic slices and half of the liquid. Strain the puree back into the saucepan. Pour the remainder of the liquid through the sieve to loosen any remaining chili pulp. Add the roux to the saucepan and whisk to blend. Add the rest of the ingredients to the pan, bring to a boil then and simmer 15-20 minutes. Taste and add additional salt and vinegar if necessary.
  25. Has anyone else picked up a copy of Lesley Téllez's new cookbook, Eat Mexico? I've long wanted to take a culinary tour of Mexico City, but I still haven't made it down there; this book is doing nothing to calm that desire! There are quite a few ingredients in it that I am going to have a hard time getting my hands on, but I thought I'd give some of the recipes a try anyway. Is anyone else cooking from it yet?
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