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Found 976 results

  1. I make this a lot. Traditionally served with dosa, but great with all kinds of Indian food, even just scooped up with bread or pappads for a snack. Although it's slightly different every time, depending on the tomatoes and chillies used, plus the strength of the tamarind, it's easy, quick to make and always delicious. In a blender - half a medium red onion chopped, 7 dried red chillies broken up a bit, 2 ripe tomatoes chopped, 1 tsp of sea salt, 3 tsp tamarind paste. Whizz until purée like about 2 minutes. In a sauté pan over medium heat add 60 ml sesame oil (gingelly), when it's hot but not smoking add 1 tsp black mustard seeds. Quickly cover the pan to prevent escape and sizzle for a minute. Add 1 tsp of urad dal (black lentils, skinned and split they are light grey). Fry until golden, another minute or so. Throw in about 20 curry leaves. These splatter so cover the pan again. Lower the heat and add the blender contents. Simmer, stirring frequently for about 10 minutes, until you get a runny jam consistency. Ta da !
  2. Every now and again I come across a recipe that is awesome. It started with a discovery in my local South Indian take away near work. This is a true South Indian place, not your usual run of the mill Indian restaurant which we get around here. In the bain marie was a red, slightly oily, dry spiced chicken dish scattered with onions and green coriander. A dish with no name. I asked what it was, and they replied it was "spicy chicken". I bought some and I was hooked. It was obviously a favorite of patrons as there was never a day when this dish was not in the bain marie and it sold out quickly. Here is my take on that recipe, which I believe is called Double Chilli Chicken. Apologies in advance, but I dont work to quantities when cooking. Hopefully you can make your own judgement but just ask if you want more clarification. The ingredients you will need are: - oil or ghee (mustard oil if my wife is giving me grief over health, ghee for best flavor) - Chicken mini drumsticks (about 1kg) - About 3 brown onions, cut in half and then sliced (red onions would be better, but I only had one for garnish) - Salt - About 20 curry leaves - Sliced ginger - Sliced garlic - 10 to 15 whole dried chillies (I remove most of the seeds) - Ground dried chilli powder (medium hot) - Ground coriander - Ground black pepper - Jaggery or Palm Sugar - Lime juice - Chopped fresh coriander for garnish - Chopped red onion for garnish I start with a heavy base fry-pan that has a fitted lid and add the ghee. Choose a dried whole chilli of your liking and remove most of the seeds, as they can burn and become bitter. Saute your dried chillies in the ghee for a few minutes You will notice they start to darken quickly Don't let them burn, but take them a bit darker than shown in the photo above and then remove into a spare bowl to cool with a slotted spoon. You can leave the ghee and seeds. Quickly add the onions to stop the remaining seeds from burning. Add salt to help the onions cook. I should have also added the curry leaves to the oil first, but I forgot so I added them later. As the onions soften on the heat, finely julienne some fresh ginger and slice some garlic. Exact quantities dont matter so adjust to your preference. Add the garlic, ginger and chillies to the pan once the onions soften and take on some colour After a few minutes of cooking out the garlic and ginger, add the ground coriander and chilli powder. Again, exact quantities don't really matter but I used about 1 Tablespoon of each. What matters more is the quality of the ground powders. The coriander is ground in my coffee grinder just before use, and I make my own chilli powder from dried Spanish Padron chillies I grow each summer. If you can, always make your own ground spices. For the ground chilli powder, remove the seeds before grinding as you will get a redder product. A quick word on chillies : There are hundreds of varieties, but I choose the Spanish Padron due to the balance between heat and flavour. I want an intense chilli flavour without searing blow your head off heat, and this chilli has that right balance. Stir the powders into the onions and cook for a few minutes. Add the chicken and arrange such that the chicken has good contact with the bottom of the pan. We need this to get the meat to release its own moisture, which is what makes the sauce and prevent the dish from burning Cover with a lid and lower the heat. After 5 minutes you should notice some liquid from the chicken. This increases to a maximum around 15 minutes. Stir every 5 minutes but don't remove the lid until 15 minutes have elapsed. While the chicken is cooking, prepare some jaggery or palm sugar and squeeze the juice out of one lime. After 15 minutes of cooking with the lid on, remove the lid, add the jaggery and lime juice, and now increase the heat. What we are going to do is evaporate the remaining liquid and turn it into an awesome sauce that sticks to the chicken. For another 10 minutes, you will need to pay careful attention to ensure the dish does not stick and burn. You need high heat to help caramelize the sauce and constant movement. Taste for seasoning. Add extra salt, lime juice and heaps of black pepper. Prepare some slived red onions for garnish. And some roughly chopped green coriander. This stuff grows like a weed in my garden as I let the kids loose with the seeds and they scatter them far and wide! Serve the chicken on a bed of steamed basmati rice And garnish with onion and coriander. Serve and enjoy with a glass of cold beer. Awesome stuff! Cheers Luke
  3. Lately i've been wondering about the use of food colouring in Indian food. Is there a traditional aesthetic use of it, or is it maybe to reproduce the colour that chilli powder or saffron would have given to a dish?
  4. We're 50 something Aussies who enjoy travelling, eating, cooking, markets, kitchen shops, cooking utensils, animals & plants (often food related), architecture & photography (both kitchens and food) and exploring different cultures (of which food is a big part). The trip was January 14 - February 6, it was just marvellous. My favourite meal is now masala dosa with sambar, I had many. Here's some highlights of the food. A late afternoon snack of Sichuan pepper squid was washed down with a beer at the Ajantha Seaview Hotel on the promenade in Pondicherry. It's a colonial building with a first floor terrace overlooking the colourful display of women in their finest, and the Bay of Bengal. We're here on a Monday public holiday for the Pongal festival, a four day celebration of the harvest, with many different ceremonies and traditions. A visual bonus, cows (and sometimes goats) get their horns painted and wear flower garlands or other decorations.
  5. The thread on Monsoon Wedding, and that film's neglect of all things culinary, leads me to ask: What have been the best cinematic depictions of Indian food and food rituals?
  6. I stumbled across a very old book called 'The Complete Book of Curries' today in a charity shop and I bought it for the princely sum of £0.19. The author is Harvey Day and I wondered if he or his writing is known to anyone here? The book - a compendium of five individual books dedicated to curries around the world - is an absolute delight. Not least because of his recipe offerings which strike an odd balance between authenticity and a very olde fashioned, almost quaint Englishness. So quaint in fact, that Day sees fit throughout the book to publish the addresses of those who helped him with the book. Presumably so people could write to them and offer their own thanks. The first of these five books was published by Kaye & Ward in 1958 in Britain. I'm not even certain about the authenticity of the recipes published. I'm as sure as can be that no one would have been able to challenge Day's assertions/recipes as I am completely unaware of other books on this subject from that time. Certainly none that I have come across. There are quite fantastic quotes in the book which he uses to highlight his thoughts on food. Although this first quote itself is not about curries, he used it to indicate his feelings about those who found curries too much of a culinary challenge to enjoy. It will also give you an indication of the tenor he adopts throughout the book. Perhaps it's the time elapsed since first publication that makes it such a glorious read, but some of it is also hilarious. For example; Each book has a small preface and in these Day offers up his thoughts on the wonder of curries and the benefit of the spices used. The preface to the second book returns again to his ideas about those unable to enjoy curries. I think Mr Finch and Mr Majumdar will enjoy this one in particular. Fantastically, he said; I'd love to post some of these recipes if I can, as I can't offer you a source where to find the book. It's long out of print and I could not find it available even through second hand sellers on the internet. If I can't - and I'm assuming someone will tell me if this is not permissible - I'd still love to ask many questions about the recipes and methods he writes of in the book. For example, Suvir, IndiaGirl or Monica, was mustard oil commonly used in Indian cooking to preserve and protect meats due to the hot climate?
  7. Wet spice/curry paste grinders

    I'm thinking of buying a wet spice/curry paste grinder. Any ideas on what brands are the best? Premier super-g, Preethi ??
  8. Dosa

    I have recently made trips to a Dosa spot that has been praised quite a lot around this site and elsewhere. I was terribly dissapointed. Dosas are one of my favorite foods. It is a pity that Indian restaurants in NYC have really not shared the magic that can come with each bite of a Dosa. Some friends of mine that have traveled to India and had loved Dosas even before making that trip, came back never wanting to eat American Indian Dosas again. There is such a marked difference. Why is that so? What makes them so different? Where do you find your favorite Dosa? What are you looking for in a good Dosa? What do you think the perfect Dosa should be like? What should the Sambhaar have in it? What consistency should it be? What should the chutney be like? What chutneys would you like to eat it with? What do you think are the authentic companions to a Dosa?
  9. Tomato Chutney

    Tomato Chutney I have missed this chutney for the longest of time. Growing up in Delhi, my sisters best friend in school was from the South. (Andhra Pradesh to be precise. Andhra is most famous for their pickles and chutneys). Her mother would make the best tomato chutney. A couple of years ago, experimenting with some really ripe tomatoes and relying on my memory, I came up with the recipe. It really tastes like Durgas mothers recipe. I now make it all the time. And in fact, when tomatoes are in season and ripe and bursting with flavor and juice, I make a lot of this chutney, can it and give it out as gifts to friends when visiting them. It is a fiery chutney for most palates. But those that are familiar with Andhra pickles and chutneys will find it just average. I love the chutney with fenugreek seeds, they add a slight bitterness to the chutney that I love. If you are not a fan of bitter tastes, avoid using it. 8 pounds very ripe beefsteak tomatoes, chopped finely 1 1/2 cup canola oil 40 fresh curry leaves 16 whole dried red chiles 2 tablespoon mustard seeds 1 tablespoon cumin seeds 1/4 teaspoon fenugreek seeds, optional 1/3 cup sugar 2 tablespoon cayenne (half if you want a milder chutney) 2 tablespoon coriander seed powder 1 tablespoon paprika 1 tablespoon sambhaar powder 2 teaspoon turmeric 1/2 teaspoon asafetida 1 6 oz. can of tomato paste 3 tablespoon salt, or more to taste 1. Pour the oil in a large sauce pot, enough to hold the tomatoes and then some. It is important that the pot be deep, as the chutney will simmer a long while and will splatter otherwise all over your stove and counter. 2. Measure out all the dried spices other than the asafetida into a bowl and set aside. 3. In the oil add the curry leaves, whole red chiles, mustard seeds, cumin seeds and fenugreek seeds if using. Fry over a medium high flame for 3 minutes or until the chiles are a nice dark color and the cumin are a nice golden brown. 4. Now add the asafetida and fry for half a minute. Add the dried spices and fry for barely half a minute and add the chopped tomatoes. Add the salt and sugar. Stir well and cook on this medium high flame for an hour and a half or until the oil has separated and the chutney begins to stick to the bottom of the pan. 5. Fill the chutney into 10 sterilized half-pint jars and process as per manufacturers instructions for 20 minutes. 6. Cool, check for seal, label and store.
  10. Kitchen King Masala?

    I noticed in Rushina's eggplant recipe that she specified Kitchen King Masala. A web search threw up several brands available. Are they all equally good? Also, is this masala based on something? I'm just wondering about its origins, as well as the possibility of making it from scratch, or is it a ubiquitous product like oyster sauce or nam pla? Pat
  11. Mirchi (Chili Peppers)

    Mirchi ( Chile Peppers ) While certainly from the New World have become an Indian cuisine staple. What chiles do you use in your cooking? How do you use them? When do you add them to your recipes? What makes you decide what chiles to use in a certain recipe? Any chile stories?
  12. Bhunooing

    Hi There, I came across this term, Bunooing, which I'd never heard before. I had a look around to try and understand the method behind it, but came across a number of inferences on what bhunooing is and how it works, some of which were conflicting and a little confusing. I would be very grateful if someone could clear this up for me and perhaps answer a few questions. This is my understanding of bhunooing so far:- Essentially, this is a method of releasing essential oils that are cooped up in your dry spices and leaves too. The types of spices used are the hard spices such as cumin seeds, cloves, cinnamon, mustard seeds etc. As I understand it powdered spice can be added, but nearer the end of the bhunooing process. The thinking behind this method is that spices take on moisture over time which dilutes the essential oils in the spices. By slow frying the spices you are gently evaporating the water and releasing the concentrated essential oils from the spice which enhances the power of spice, giving it more punch. The bhunooing process can be used to make a vibrant base for your gravy. To do this, heat a good amount of oil on high and then bring it down to a medium heat. Add your spices and onion and slowly fry until the onion turns a light brown. At this point add your liquid/ gravy. Some questions that I have are:- Why heat the oil to hot and bring to medium? Why not just heat to medium?Does bhunooing always have to include onions?The first time I tried this, the onions absorbed all of the oil after a while - is this okay? Or does it mean that I used too much oil?Is this the same, or does it have any relation to the bhuna?I have come across articles and recipes that refer to bhunooing and suggest that it's (perhaps) just the process of slow cooking ingredients on a flame/ hob - is this correct?How long should I be frying the spices for?I would be very grateful for any help you can provide. Thank you in advance Phill
  13. Come on now, lets hear it.. what spicy chicken recipe (Indian inspired) do you love.. why? Is it the spicy chettinand? Chicken 65? Malabar Chilli Chicken? Your own creation? I have super selfish movites... I want to try something new
  14. Indian Food

    INDIAN FOOD NEWS: Check here frequently for hot links to food articles, essays, columns and reviews published in food media across the world. Content may cover non-indian food too but related to India or Indians. Some of these links may require free registration to log in. Virendra Sehwag's wedding menu plans £8m settlement ends row that divided curry dynasty Scotland's curry king Charan Gill named Asian entrepreneur of the year Kolkata restaurant happenings See what Chef Praveen Anand is up to at the Dakshin There is not much difference between Pakistani and Indian cooking, explains chef Qureshi Masala Bistro showcases rich, elegant Indian and Bengali food in Detroit Opening shortly, on April 29, in London's Curry Street is Michael Caine's light 'n' tangy Indian restaurant 'Deya', glorified by The Guardian for serving gravy delights without ghee and hot masalas . Cyrus Todiwala gets a new spelling and the UK's Guardian answers Jason's post on freaky pigments Haldi study is another step in determining if curry can protect against Alzheimer's Curcumin, which provides the yellow color in curry, may activate a key enzyme Washington, DC -- A new study has found that curry, a common and popular cooking additive, could be an effective enhancer of an enzyme that protects the brain against oxidative conditions. This research is an important first step in determining whether curry could be preventive agent against acute neurodegenerative conditions, or reducing the progression of chronic and age associated neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. Free Radicals and Neurodegenerative Disease One of the most prominent current theories of aging is the "free radical theory." According to this theory, free radical molecules generated through mitochondrial metabolism can act as causative factor of abnormal function and cell death. Various toxins in the environment can injure mitochondrial enzymes, leading to increased generation of free radicals and oxidative stress, that over the life-span would eventually play a major role in aging. Free radical's oxidative damage to key intracellular targets such as DNA or proteins has been shown to be a major cause of the degenerative diseases related to aging such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease. At the same time, a number of studies have supported the beneficial effects of some commonly used natural products in preventing various pathologic conditions. Spices and herbs often contain phenolic substances with potent antioxidative and chemopreventive properties. Among them is curcumin, a natural phenolic agent, extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma Longa, and the yellow pigment in curry, strongly induced HO-1 expression and activity in rat astrocytes. Conclusions This study identifies a novel compound that could be used for therapeutic purposes as potent inducers of HO-1 for protecting brain cells against oxidative conditions. The researchers believe that additional in vitro and in vivo studies are necessary to determine whether curcumin can be used as preventive agent against acute neurodegenerative conditions that affect an increasingly aged population. The American Physiological Society (APS) is America's oldest biomedical sciences research society. The not-for-profit society, with some 11,000 members, is the publisher of 14 scientific journals, including the American Journal of Physiology, which has been published since 1898.
  15. I am doing some research and could really use some assistance. Are you on a lowcarb diet or on Atkins -- are you preparing any any Indian dishes.. PM me if you are upto doing a short interview with me i am also looking for boards on Atkins in India and any other related materials.. would love your help
  16. where can i go to get good indian food in london? I'm not looking for anything fancy. I love chana masala, butter chicken, sag paneer, nan and chutneys. We are staying near Harrods.
  17. Paneer/cottage cheese whey

    hi all. just started making paneer and i've read a recipe where you can use the old whey from a previous batch to seperate the whey from the curds in a new batch. i used lemon juice for the first batch. i've since used that whey for a new lot and it's turned out a lot more tender (kind of like philly). anyone know how many time the old whey can be used? not sure about bacteria etc. hope this makes sense cheers
  18. Samosas

    Where did you last eat your favorite samosa? What made it so? How was it different from the others you have eaten?
  19. Hi, I just want an Indian perspective on this topic for a couple of questions. I know that Hyderabad biryani was the most recognized biryani and I will be going to Indian really soon. Here a Video that I found on YouTube about Hyderabad biryani https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhajwFlquPk Questions: 1. Why did they put so many ingredients in the process of making it? 2. Why did they put curd in the biryani? 3. Why did they put in white rice on top and not mixed? 4. Why did they pour hot water in the chicken?
  20. My kitchen smells like my moms today! I am making her recipe for Chole or chick peas. We have two methods: the easy way and the lazy way First chickpeas are soaked overnight Next they are cooked in a pressure cooker along with cinnamon stick, black cardamom, peppercorns, cloves and bay leaves -- until tender. Set aside Easy way - Make a gravy with ginger, onions, tomatoes -- cook it down until the oil separates from the gravy. Add red chilies, salt, turmeric (if you wish), freshly ground coriander seed powder, garam masala powder, dried mango powder and a large tablespoon of tamarind (yes tamarind) pulp. Add the chick peas and mix well. Leave to cook for another 15 minutes The lazy way -- In a large skillet.. heat some oil. Add thin slices of ginger and a (paste made with water) tablespoon or two of red chilies, tumermic, coriander powder, garam masala and salt to taste. Let is sizzle add the chole and cook it for a few minutes and you are done Secret ingredient - I love Roopak's Channa Masala and usually add a heaping tablespoon full for extra flavor So how do you make yours? I am going to add the recipe for Bhatura .. the bread to go along with this in a minute.. as soon as someone tells me how to get my head to stop pounding!
  21. Roti – what flour is best?

    I make roti with white and whole wheat flour...can u also get a good consistency with besan flour ?
  22. Kerala( southern most state of India), we call it "GODS OWN COUNTRY", why won’t it be ... Lush green fields , beautiful rivers and lakes , backwaters , unadulterated spices , Big coconut trees (now even come in varieties with yellow coconut on them), sprawling beaches , ancient temples , mysterious shrines , beautiful churches , enthralling wild life, pure ayurveda , amazing martial arts , enchanting dance forms , classical music and top of all beautiful people. It’s an amalgamation of extraordinary things, but the thing that has left the most biggest impact on my soul, is the cuisine of this beautiful state. Coming from a Malayali family(resident of kerala), I always looked forward to our visits to Kerala just for the food, the smell of those freshly cut bananas deep frying, fresh fish coated in spices and shallow fried, rice delicacies cooked in banana leaves, greatest varieties of tubers, stews, appams, parotha and for the sweet tooth’s the Special Halwa(convection) from those lovely bakeries which are mushrooming everywhere in the state. Being a coastal state Kerala cuisine has in it lots of seafood delicacies, beautiful fresh water fishes, cooked in aromatic masala is a feast for soul. Being a avid foodie there are varieties of recipes which I would love to share but the recipe which I will be sharing is the one which I always look forward to and the one unique taste which I deeply miss, although I have been trying this recipe here in Delhi but the taste which comes from cooking in earthenware (chetti) dish and using kokum / gamboge ( souring agent found in kerala) and fresh ingredients of Kerala is not matched. The smell of the curry with deep red colour is something for the senses to feel. So I would like to share one my mother’s recipe which is meen (fish) curry Fish - 500 gms Salt- 2 tsp Turmeric - 1 tsp Fenugreek Powder - 1 tsp Red chilli powder - 2 tsp Onion - 2 tbsp chopped Ginger- 1 tbsp finely chopped Garlic - 1 tbsp finely chopped Kokum/ gamboge - 2 no. Curry Leaves - 7 nos. Water - 2 cups Method: 1. Finally chop ginger , garlic and onions and keep aside 2. Rub little salt on the fish pieces (skinned or de skinned fillets) and keep it to rest. 3. Take oil in a special earthenware (called chetti), add oil and sauté onions, garlic and ginger. 4. Once the raw aroma of garlic is not felt, add turmeric, coriander, fenugreek & red chilli powder. 5. When the masala is cooked add kokum and fish 6. Add water and little salt and let the fish cook in water. 7. Reduce it till the desired consistency is reached. 8. Serve with rice or kappa Note: if you don’t have( kokum/ gamboge) , tamarind or tomatoes can be used as alternative. This dish tastes best with boiled kappa (which is a tuber found in Kerala) or with steamed rice.
  23. Dallas: Indian Restaurants?

    I haven't been to Dallas in years. However, my work is taking me there again soon. I remember years ago eating in a fairly good Indian restaurant. I have no clue what part of town I was in. However, I haven't had Indian in a while, so can anyone recommend some good places? Non-Indian as well. I have meetings with some large department stores, so I will be all over the city. And I will have a car rented. -Ophelie
  24. Home-made biryani

    does anyone have a regular home-kitchen friendly recipe for chicken or goat biryani that they'd be willing to share? what do i mean by "regular home-kitchen friendly"? a recipe that doesn't require multiple hours of prep, multiple helpers or overly expensive/exotic ingredients or utensils. thanks in advance!
  25. Yogurt Substitute

    I recently picked up an Indian cookbook (my sweetie loves the cuisine, I am warming up to it). A lot of the recipes call for yogurt, which I can't eat due to lactose intolerance. Any suggestions on a lactose-free substitute?
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