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Found 988 results

  1. Numerous have been the occasions when our patrons have explained their absence during the summer months with ,' its too hot for Indian food'. What do you think ? I have some views on this but would like to hear from all you wonderful people out there. Thanks
  2. rajsuman

    Dals

    I was reading Italian Food by Elizabeth David when I came across a recipe where you first fry onions in oil, then add the lentils, fry some more, add water and cook until the lentils are done. That made me wonder if such a practice exists in Indian cooking. Does it? Any advantages of doing this? Suman
  3. jackal10

    Asparagus with Indian spices

    Asparagus with Indian spices Serves 2 as Appetizer. This is an entry for Monica's competition. I have not tested it myself, asparagus not yet being in season here. 1 lb Fresh Asparagus 2 T Olive or groundnut oil 2 T FIncely shreded coconut 1 tsp salt 1 tsp Light curry powder of your favourite spice mixture 1. Prepare the asparagus: break off the tough part of the base of the sticks, and if fancy peel from below the bud area 2. Toss with the oil 3. Roast in a hot oven for 10 minutes 4. In a hot pan put the salt and the ground spices, heat until the aroma is released. 5. Mix in the grated coconut 6. Plate the asparagus and either strew the coconut mix over, or leave on the side of the plate, or put a soft poached egg on the plate, and top with the spice mixture ( RG983 )
  4. Just wanted to let you all know about Angeethi it's across from Tortilla Factory and We went there today for lunch and they had shrimp, goat, chicken 4 ways, chaat bar (always) tons of free lassi and other drinks, rice pudding and gulab jamun desserts, rice 2 ways and 3 types of breads all for under $30. w/tip for 2! It was a fine way to break a diet IMHO! Happy holidays to y'all and you really need to get over here especially on a Saturday they have made-to-order omelets and other goodies too
  5. Have a duck in our freezer, that seems to call to me, "Eat me, Eat me"... Have googled "recipes indian duck"...About a bazillion hits on Bombay Duck, which of course, is fish... A couple recipes for "Duck Vindaloo"...While almost any of gods creatures would indeed be enhanced by preparation Vindaloo style, I can't seem to find much else. Is waterfowl not popular in India?, or am I just not looking in the right places?
  6. So I just acquired Lord Krishna's Cuisine and, while it's pretty neat and has an amazing collection of sweets, it also doesn't use onions and garlic. Instead it tends to use asafoetida, which makes me feel pretty sick when I smell it, so I want to rehabilitate those recipes, and re-substitute onion and garlic for it. Anyone have any ideas about that?
  7. Monica Bhide

    Karanjee

    We spent the afternoon today making "Karanjees". Soft dough is prepared with all purpose flour and milk. Then it is rolled out into small discs. We stuffed some with spiced peas and some with a coconut jaggery mixture. Sealed it in half moon shapes and deep fried it... delicious. See here for pics tomorrow do you make these? what is your secret to making perfect karanjees?
  8. Hema's is great but the service (lack thereof) amd wait is really a drag-Have taken friends to Hema's, Viceroy, Ghandi and Tippen. Looking for another place for variety sake. Prefer nonvegetarian. Heard that Bhabi's on Oakley is really good. Anyone been? Thanks.
  9. wgallois

    Special juices

    Has there ever been a discussion of Indian juice bars on the board? I have a question relating to so-called 'special juices' which are sometimes on offer in such places. In Indian-run juice bars in the Emirates these often have great names, but there is often no clue as to what kind of fruit cocktail they consist of, and I am curious as to whether there exists a set of names that Indians across the world would recognise. I know that a 'Lexus' consists of mango and avocado juice with ice cream, but what about a 'Disco', a 'Titanic', a 'www', a 'Valentine Day' or a 'Computer'? I would guess that mixes such as 'Mumtaz' and 'Wastha' are specific to this part of the world, but perhaps I am wrong? I have a lot of affection for such juice bars as I think they provide drinks which are both tasty and nutritious.
  10. mongo_jones

    indian rums

    forgive me if this has been discussed before. rum is huge in india, especially with people in the armed forces (as we call the military). perhaps the biggest indian favorite: old monk
  11. cubgirl

    DAHL

    I am new around here but would like a good recipe for Dahl, if someone could help me please. Thanks
  12. Hello, I am looking for a handi also call degchi or panai. It is a cooking pot with a neck. Does anyone in the DC area know of a store that seels Indian cooking pots? Or if not that, a web site? Thanks to all.
  13. Does anyone out there have an Indian recipes to share on Okra? A friend recently send me a huge box of it from her garden and I'm tired of using them as thickeners for my Gumbo.
  14. So. A top-of-the-line wood-fired smoker, bought capriciously, used once, and forgotten about, has been idling on Jeff's deck for two or three summers now. Last weekend, we made it our mission to fire the thing up and smoke the best damn brisket in the world, armed not-very-promisingly with zero experience, more or less nothing in the way of resources, and only our unshakeable faith in the sanctity and nobility of the cause protecting us from apocalypse. Saturday, 9 October 8:30am Good morning. We woke up early on Saturday, yawned, and started planning the shopping list, sequence of events, and how much beer we'd need. We went to our (inexplicably) favorite diner in the world: The Tastee Diner in scenic Laurel, Maryland. The day was a little overcast and gloomy, the clouds swollen with a threat of cold drizzle. Nonetheless, we soldiered on with our plans. We formed a plan of attack over eggs, bacon, corned beef hash, potatoes and coffee. <A side note: the Tastee Diner is run-down and shabby, the sort of place where the waitress lights a Bronco 120, leaves it burning in the ashtray, and strolls over to take your order. The potatoes - no fancy "home fries" or "hashbrowns" business here; just "potatoes, with onions or without" - are excellent, boiled, roughed up, and crisp round the edges like a perfect frite.> Note Colonel Klink's excellent eGCI course on the table, along with lists of things to buy and maps of where we'd accumulate all our supplies. Please note the rubber band in the upper-right corner of the flag-trivia placemat, found lurking in the aforementioned (still) wonderful potatoes. Filled with youthful hubris (and keeping in mind the protection given to drunks and fools), we hadn't put much thought into where to obtain the brisket. I'd posted in the DC board for suggestions but hadn't called anyone yet, thinking that it would be an easy matter of strolling into a deli or butcher and just picking one up. Unfortunately, we'd forgotten that the kosher delis would be closed on Saturdays, and every other place we called seemed to think we were nuts when we asked for a whole, untrimmed brisket. We did find one place - Wagshal's on Massachusetts Avenue in DC - but they were insistent on charging $6.99 a pound for the beast, which seemed a little ridiculous. Deflated, we started altering plans for a trimmed flat, deciding to mop with beer and mustard. It still seemed doable, but not nearly on the all-out overkill scale we'd been envisioning. We pulled out of the diner's parking lot, a little wind taken out of our sails. Then, we saw this: The Laurel Meat Market. The giant fiberglass cow out front gave us hope. Our hearts thudding, we went to the meat counter, and happily took home an 11-pound baby with beautiful fat to the tune of $2.99 a pound. Oddly, the meat market (which in a perhaps synergistic relationship is a block from the equally incongruous Outback Leather, with a giant fiberglass cowboy out font) appears dingy out front, but hides beautifully colored, fresh-smelling beef, pork and fish inside for surprisingly low prices. The tilapia was particularly enticing, snowy-white and fleshy, for $4.15 a pound. We will return. 11 am Meat in hand, and feeling pretty good about the day, we went to get wood. A bit down Route 29 from Jeff's house, we found a farmstand that sells 'lopes and corn earlier in the summer and pumpkins and firewood at this time of year. After some conferring with the sweet lady who seemed to run things, we loaded an entire tree's worth of seasoned hickory into the back of Jeff's truck. She sold it to us for a dollar a stick. When given the opportunity to count what we'd loaded, she said, "I trust you", smiled, and waved us off. We went grocery shopping for peripheral foodstuffs, and went home. 3 pm Time to start cooking. I started some quick spicy pickles: by submerging some kirbys overnight in a boiled and cooled brine of wine vinegar, mustard seeds, fennel seeds, coriander seeds, peppercorns, salt, pepper flakes, cilantro and dill. 7 pm Jeff got home from the gym, came out of the shower, and was seized by an irresistible urge to wrestle with the brisket. As you can see, it got the better of him: But not of me: After some earnest consultation with Col. Klink's course, the web and various anecdotal sources, we decided on a cumin-spiked version of Klink's rub for the meat. We were told, variously, "just salt and pepper", "every spice you can use", and "carefully blended flavors". Our dry rub consisted of salt, brown sugar, pepper, cumin, red pepper flakes, turmeric, dry garlic, oregano, thyme and parsley. The second photo pretty well describes the vision in our heads at that point - meat, endless fields of meat. Taking this as a bad sign, we cleaned up for the night and went to bed. Sunday, 10 October 8 am The day started like any other Sunday, though the spectre of the smoker looming outside the sliding glass door, and the tray of meat bowing the shelves in Jeff's fridge, lurked in the corners of our eyes and put courage in our hearts. It turned out to be a beautiful day, cool and sunny buried in the woods where we were. It took us a long time to get the fire right. Every fire we started seemed to consume the kindling, catch the logs, flare, burn brightly for a few minutes, and then peter out quickly. Blowing; playing with the damper; opening the lids for airflow; nothing helped. Desperate, we stuffed way too many logs in the firebox and lit the whole thing with a kilogram of C4. Actually, we just kept adding wood until we had a big, bright self-sustaining fire going - the highly technical barbecue jargon term for the scene above is "too damn hot." The temperature reading on the closed smoker lid was going nuts - the needle was straining above 475, the maximum reading. We decided the best course of action would be to open the smoker lid, open the damper entirely for maximum airflow, and let the fire burn down to a more manageable state. 12 pm Luckily, it was noon at this point. Aaaaaaahhhh. The beer we drank yesterday is a (formerly local; now it's brewed in Wisconsin) beer called National Bohemian, or Natty Bo for those in the know. It's the Baltimore beer of choice for broke UMBC and Johns Hopkins students, bums, and insufferably smug hipsters who drink PBR in NYC bars because it's, like, retro, man. Though it tastes more like sugar water than beer, we thought it was in keeping with the commando spirit of the weekend - not to mention that, at $5.10 a 12-pack, it opened up our beef budget considerably. We finally got a handle on the fire, and put the meat on. Jeff busied himself with splitting wood, While I smoked meat and cigarettes. 1 pm Around this time, we figured out the best way to manage the fire - we soaked split sticks in water, in a pot sitting above the firebox - a hot-water soaked stick, when placed in the fire, created a lot of smoke and caught quickly without flaring the temperature too much. The inferno we'd imagined was too hot for our purposes; a steady, smoldering 225 meant just about one small, soaked stick resting on a bed of embers. 4 pm It was a really beautiful day, and we were sitting outside, soaking up the last of the Indian summer sun, watching the fire and drinking. Though the chimney was belching out delicious-smelling smoke, we were sitting upwind and didn't notice. Jeff's roommates emerged from the house, drawn inexorably by the pervasive odor leaching into the vents. "Dude, what is that?" "Dude, it's eleven pounds of meat." "Oh." 5 pm This is what the meat looked like at 4 hours and 3 beers: 7 pm While Jeff was outside, diligently tending the fire and checking the brisket (a seriously good-looking, charred black piece of baby-bottom soft beef at this point), I busied myself with a scallion-y potato salad and other peripherals. 8:30pm Check out that smoke ring: We're eating the brisket - succulent, juicy, and deeply smoky, suddenly not just beef but transubstantiated into something miraculous and wholly different - along with delicious pickles, onions, potato salad, wonder bread and garlicky Texas toast while watching the Redskins-Ravens game. It's Sunday night; my clothes smell like smoke; we're curled on the couch with a fire in the fireplace and a distinct chill coming in through the open screen door. BJ Sams scores an out-of-nowhere touchdown for the Ravens; Joe Gibbs looks terrified and constipated. We're comfortably full and sleepy, happy with the success of our grand project, ready for bed.
  15. Episure

    Indian restaurants

    There are chains of Chinese, Japanese, Mexican, Italian, Jamaican restaurants( to name a few ethnic ones.) and whether you are a fan or not, the fact is that chain restaurants do a fair bit to promote that Country's cuisine. This ultimately benefits stand alone operators too as more diners become exposed to the cuisine. Why hasn't any Indian restaurant come to the fore? My guess is that the cuisine has to be doctored a little bit to give it broader appeal. Any thoughts?
  16. Where can I go to get indian products and the like. I am curious as to what I would find at one of these stores. I am also showing my Indian buddy around town for a month and he inquired about this. Thanks for the help! Ben
  17. Hello I'm Indian living in France. Since it's the season now, have you had experience in cooking game Indian style. Back in India, in the north of Bombay where my parents have a farmhouse, the Warli tribals used to cook game. Thanks
  18. Hi, I want to cook a version of mushroom sukke that my sister-in-law makes. I need to use triphala for it. The only way I've seen it being used is in its whole form. They boil it in water and use the water to flavour the dish or use it in tadka. I want to know if I could roast it up and powder it - I have a limited stock, so can't afford to waste it on experimentation. That's also the reason I'd rather not use them whole and then discard them if I can help it. I know this has been discussed elsewhere and remember Episure mentioning roasting and grinding it. I wonder if the flavour is more potent when you grind it? Can you grind it finely to a powder? Will the ground spice lend a bitter taste to the dish or a produce a tingling sensation in the mouth, the kind you get when you suck on a szechuan peppercorn? And you're right Episure - this spice deserves more recognition than it gets. I absolutely love its aroma and the flavour it lends to the dish. Any advice greatly appreciated. Thanks, Suman
  19. Monica Bhide

    Janamashtmi is coming

    The heartwarming festival of Janamashtmi is around the corner. This festival celebrates the birth of Lord Krishna. I am planning a prayer service at home and would like to follow it with a meal. What would you all suggest? What is typical..? I hope our newest member who cooked at the ISCKON temple will help me out here.
  20. I guess Suneeta has been working on her cookbook for upwards of 20 years. It is out now. I've done a bunch of recipes from it, and I know many of them from her cooking classes here in Houston. The book is excellent. I love the way the book is laid out, it is designed to make following the recipes fast and easy. There are three columns for each recipe, the left column has the measures listed in English units, the center column lists the ingredients, and the right column has the measures listed in metric units. The cooking instructions are excellent. The headnotes consist of information on the dish and tips for the dish. This is a cookbook by a teacher who knows how to put a recipe together. Here's the beauty of the book, by way of example. How many times have you seen a cookbook recipe that calls for, say, "1 onion chopped"? What size onion would that be, exactly? Here in Texas an onion can be pretty bid. In Europe, they aren't as big. What Suneeta has done is demystify the list of ingredients by using measures of cups, teaspoons, and tablespoons, or, metric weights. This is awesome! It makes the recipes foolproof. And it gives you a baseline for later changing the recipe up to suit personal tastes. I own 5 Indian cookbooks, and I have read quite a few more. But this is the one that I will default to. This book should be in every cook's collection. It is that good. I would recommend starting with the following: Chicken in Cashew Saffron Gravy North Indian Lamb Curry on Bread Whole Baked Masala Cauliflower Bell Peppers with Roasted Chickpea Flour Dhokla (a fast and easy recipe using cream of wheat that produces beautiful results) Split Yellow Peas with Tamarind Chutney Gena's Kababs (flavored with green onions, ginger, cilantro, crisp fried onions)
  21. Anu

    Phirni

    I am making dinner for some friends and would like to make phirni for dessert...however I want to try something different with it...adding fruit, different flavors...Does anyone have any suggestions?
  22. I drive through Newark Avenue often and notice all of the Indian restaurants and stores. I have not gone to any of them in years, and need some help. Are there any standouts? Thanks, Joana
  23. I tried my hand at a Basmati rice dish last night, using Julie Sahni's Classic Indian Cooking. The dish called for the rice to be prepared by 1/2 hour of steeping, then some frying (until translucent) and then about 20 minutes of cooking at various temperatures with the reserved water from steeping. The ratio of water to rice was 2:1. When finished, the rice had a watery taste to me, not the rice-y taste that I associate with Basmati. What did I do wrong?
  24. Suvir Saran

    Indian Food

    How does the fact that Indian cooking in homes is largely vegetarian affect the restaurants serving Indian food? What effect does it have on the sales in a restaurant? Do people go to them primarily to eat meats and sate their cravings thereof? Any thoughts?
  25. Monica Bhide

    Railway food

    Travel by Indian rail? What did you enjoy at the stations or on the train? Come reminisce One of my favs was omlettes on a train from Delhi to Chandigarh....
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