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Found 955 results

  1. Can anybody recommend any good books for chutney/relish making? Preferably something that's available in the UK - but open to looking elsewhere. Many Thanks Darryl.
  2. A recent college graduate on a shoestring budget, my sister recently received a crock pot from our dear mum. I would like to supplement that gift with a decent crock pot cookbook. Are there any out there that are particularly user-friendly for a (very) unkitchen-friendly, lazy, and thrifty cook? Your help is appreciated.
  3. When I compare my German cookbooks with my American ones one thing which I don't like with most of the American cookbook is that they are lacking pictures of the dishes. I am not talking about "food porn" (where the pictures only cover lousy recipes) but I think a good cookbook only becomes an excellent cookbook if the visual part is also in place. And you will find hardly any excellent German cookbook without stunning pictures. There are of course exceptions (e.g. The Cook's Book etc.) but what kind of cookbooks do you have with great recipes and great pictures ?
  4. Pweaver1984

    Cuisine Spontanee

    Just wondering if anyone has this book? I have his Girardet book published in 2002, which I really like. Is it a lot different? Translation good? Worth having?
  5. Hi all, I have been trying to locate the complete Grand Livre de Cuisine series in English. From his French website and my very limited school French I believe he has published 5 titles for the series: 1. "Classic" Cuisine 2. Desserts and Pastries 3. Mediterranean 4. Bistro and Brasserie 5. Contemporary style Apparently volumes 1 and 2 have been published but I have not been able to find any English version for volumes 3 to 5. Dropped an enquiry to Ducasse's website but no response. Does anyone know if we will ever need to go to the French original for the complete series, or will we see an English version some day? Thanks in advance and any help will be much appreciated. Regards,
  6. CDRFloppingham

    Best cookbook for dieters

    My fiance and I are too fat. Can any of you recommend a non-fad (low carb or whatever) cookbook?
  7. I would like to begin Vietnamese cooking- I would like titles of good cookbooks, etc.
  8. LindaK

    Food52

    Has anyone else seen this? Amanda Hesser has started a series of weekly recipe competitions, with the winning recipes to be published in a forthcoming cookbook. Food52 What do you think of this concept? Anyone here participating?
  9. Don't know if anyone out there can help me with this. About 10 years ago I was in a used book store here in scenic central Oklahoma and there were several copies of a cookbook which, as I recall, basically glorified in a rather tongue-in-cheek way the food of the 1950s. I think the cover was done in shades of pink and black. I'm trying to locate this book and can't seem to get at a title or author. This is not aided by the fact that my memory may be faulty on the look of the cover. Does anyone have a clue what this cookbook might be? Any help would be much appreciated... Thanks, Rinsewind
  10. Does anyone have any thoughts about Alice Waters' new "40 Years of Chez Panisse"? Not a recipe cookbook - more of a memoir/history/picture book.
  11. So, if I were to get only one cookbook by Madhur Jaffrey, which would I get? Sincerely, Dante
  12. localherbavore

    D'Maore Knife Sharpening Book

    My chef posted on CIA's allumni site to see if anyone had an extra copy, but I will try here as well. It should look like a spiral-bound stack of papers, but I am looking for a copy of this. After several discussions of knife shapening techniques and philosophies I am intrigued to read this. If anyone can help, thank you in advance.
  13. OliverB

    Morimoto

    I just got this book yesterday and I must say, I'm quite intrigued by some (if not most) of the recipes. Does anybody here have this book, and if so, have you used it? I'm tentatively looking for that one book to cook myself all the way through (like the French Laundry, Alinea, etc blogs). From what I've read so far, I can get pretty much everything needed at local Asian markets. I'd be curious to hear from others that might have used this book already, as sometimes books read nicer than they actually work in the end... The book is thinner than I expected, but it's really a gorgeous publication with very good and appetizing photos. Lots of technique photos too with step by step instructions. While I really don't care for the "cooking" show Iron Chef at all, I must say that I'm very impressed by this book so far, and it at least appears that Morimoto was very involved in it's creation. Lots of personal little anecdotes just add to the fun of reading. Oliver PS: I did a search here and could not find a thread about this book, if there is one I'm sorry for starting a new one.
  14. I just bought the River Cottage Handbook on making preserves, and I'm interested in getting one or two more. Can anyone here recommend a decent book on the subject? Ideally they would discuss a natural process, with as few unsavory ingredients as possible, or they would spend a fair amount of time discussing traditional ways of making jams (as opposed to modern ways that utilize newfangled equipment).
  15. RobertCollins

    Good Meat by Deborah Krasner

    Good Meat by Deborah Krasner caught my eye this morning and so I looked thru it. It looks great and has my interest but before I shell out $40, I thought I'd see if anybody has an opinion.
  16. The "Julie/Julia" project has given me the idea that I could learn a lot by working through an important cookbook with classic dishes. But which cookbook to choose? I thought something appropriate might be "The Cook's Book" by Jill Norman. It has the basics like stocks and soups, as well as varied cuisines. However, some of the recipes are famous chef's signature dishes, and I don't feel I can attempt those yet. Plus it feels more encyclopedic, rather than having chapters that build on previous lessons. Julia Child's books have the distinct advantage of lengthy texts where she explains everything in detail, including suggested fixes if a dish goes wrong. But do I spend a full year making French dishes I may never repeat? Or, is this a wonderful education that would be helpful in all future cooking, no matter what the cuisine? I thought of going down the path of Mexican food, which my husband and I both love, by using Rick Bayless' "Mexican Kitchen". That would be fun, but would not help me learn the European classics. Another book I own is Cook's Illustrated "New Best Recipe" with 1,000 exhaustively tested recipes, including things like "Easy Pork Chops". Will I learn the most from this book? And then there's the Culinary Institute's "Professional Chef" tome, which I don't enjoy because I have to convert everything down from 10 portion recipes. I know the obvious answer is that one can learn from any of these books, the trick is to get in the kitchen and start cooking. But, considering my over-the-hill age, I want to learn the most in the least amount of time, that will help me in all future cooking, no matter what the style or ingredients. Any advice?
  17. ChrisTaylor

    Apicius

    I'd like a copy of Apicius. I'd like an English translation and I'd prefer--really prefer--it to have no substitutes for ingredients. Or, if it does include substitutes, to also mention what the original ingredient was. I've looked at a couple of online versions and found it doesn't tell you what the original item was. What's the best and most reliable hardcopy translation?
  18. My copy of eGullet Society board member Paula Wolfert's Mediterranean Clay Pot Cooking arrived a few days ago. I know many members have been waiting for it as long as I have, especially those who helped Paula with her recipe testing. And it looks like it's more than worth the wait. A helpful clay pot primer on types of clay pots and how to season them starts off the book. Chapters follow on First Courses Soups Fish and Shellfish Chicken, Duck and Other Poultry Meats Pasta and Grains Vegetables and Beans Savory Pies and Breads Egg and Dairy dishes Desserts Has anyone else seen the book yet? What do you think?
  19. Has anyone used Walter's latest baking book and do you have an opinion on whether it is worth adding to an already extensive baking collection? Particularly interested in the yeasted bread sections--danish, etc. Thanks.
  20. I guess Suneeta has been working on her cookbook for upwards of 20 years. It is out now. I've done a bunch of recipes from it, and I know many of them from her cooking classes here in Houston. The book is excellent. I love the way the book is laid out, it is designed to make following the recipes fast and easy. There are three columns for each recipe, the left column has the measures listed in English units, the center column lists the ingredients, and the right column has the measures listed in metric units. The cooking instructions are excellent. The headnotes consist of information on the dish and tips for the dish. This is a cookbook by a teacher who knows how to put a recipe together. Here's the beauty of the book, by way of example. How many times have you seen a cookbook recipe that calls for, say, "1 onion chopped"? What size onion would that be, exactly? Here in Texas an onion can be pretty bid. In Europe, they aren't as big. What Suneeta has done is demystify the list of ingredients by using measures of cups, teaspoons, and tablespoons, or, metric weights. This is awesome! It makes the recipes foolproof. And it gives you a baseline for later changing the recipe up to suit personal tastes. I own 5 Indian cookbooks, and I have read quite a few more. But this is the one that I will default to. This book should be in every cook's collection. It is that good. I would recommend starting with the following: Chicken in Cashew Saffron Gravy North Indian Lamb Curry on Bread Whole Baked Masala Cauliflower Bell Peppers with Roasted Chickpea Flour Dhokla (a fast and easy recipe using cream of wheat that produces beautiful results) Split Yellow Peas with Tamarind Chutney Gena's Kababs (flavored with green onions, ginger, cilantro, crisp fried onions)
  21. I am trying to track down a somewhat old cookbook. it was put out by the sunmaid fruit company. its titled something along the lines of "sunmaid little raisin cookbook" but i'm not sure. What i am sure of is it has the best carrot cake recipe in it. I am in trouble for misplacing it in the move. My girlfriend loves that cake and book but more so the cake. She says its the only good carrot cake. So my fellow egulleters if anybody knows the book I am talking about or has it or even just the recipe for the carrot cake i would appreciate it if someone could help.
  22. Sun Grease

    "El Bulli" Cookbook

    Hello everyone, does anyone have any information on where to purchase the El Bulli cookbook other than the el Bulli website? I've looked around online and found nothing, but I really would to add this book to my collection. Thanks
  23. I run a food blog called Wrightfood - http://www.mattikaarts.com/blog The Wrightfood cookbook has been in the works for quite a while now. I first came up with the idea over a year ago, and have been working on it ever since. The book is far from being done - only about 50% has been written and photographed in fact, but I wanted to get peoples opinions on the food, the photographs, the pacing of the recipes and so forth. Friends have said they love it, but then they would, they are friends. I need as many people as possible to take a look, and to let me know what they think - honestly. So, here it is. The Wrightfood cookbook. The aim of the book is not to have thousands of recipes (this, as you see it here, is about 50% of what it will contain), but rather just a handful of really well documents quality recipes. Every stage in each recipe is documented with photographs, and decent descriptions. The idea is that a new cook and pick this up, and with little practice produce the food in here. No stone is left unturned, nothing is left to guesswork. The food is simple, clean, tasty and fresh. http://www.mattikaarts.com/wrightfood/press/wrightfood.pdf - here it is. You will need Adobe reader to view it. Hope you enjoy it, and let me know what you think. The cookbook website is: http://www.mattikaarts.com/wrightfood - you can find out more about me and the book there.
  24. Not only would I buy an egullet cookbook, I would contribute to it being made!! Did anyone ever think of having our own egullet cookbook? Maybe a ring folder type that can be added to on a yearly basis...I wish there was such a one.
  25. Forget about which Food TV personality you are! This, I think, takes the (colored with saffron and stuffed with honey and dried figs) cake for cooking-related quizzes. I give you: Which Medieval or Renaissance Cookbook Are You? Me, I'm Platina's De Honesta Voluptate. Well, at least it's in Latin...
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