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Found 518 results

  1. I hope this isn't an idiot question. But I have no idea what the differences are. Please teach me.
  2. formerly grueldelux

    Press Pot/French Press Coffee

    re:brewing coffee in a press. A few years ago I saw someone from Peet's Coffee (perhaps the founder/president) on Martha Stewart and his directions were to pour a small amount of water over the grounds, stir, let sit for a minute while the grounds "bloom", stir again, then pour in the remainder of the water. I've been following this method ever since and wondered if anyone had any thoughts on it. Do you think the extra step is needed? I actually can't tell any bloomin difference in the taste but I'm bloomin well not going to change my coffee ritual now. (pardon me if this topic has been done to death before; I used the new search engine and didn't come up with anything for blooming coffee) Forget the Martha reference, it's right here. Now that I read the Peet's site, I see the stirring takes place after the remaining water is added.
  3. thecuriousone

    Recipe for mit schlag?

    Hi everybody- Where can I find a recipe for mit schlage? I would like to make some coffee drinks for the holidays and top them with it. I havent been able to find anything other than a basic whipped cream recipe. Thanks for all of your help.
  4. INSTEAD OF COFFEE? - MORNING GREEN COCKTAIL After waking up, most of us head towards the kitchen for the most welcome morning drink. Coffee opens our eyes, gets us up and motivates us to act. Today I would like to offer you a healthy alternative to daily morning coffee. I don't want to turn you off coffee completely. After all, it has an excellent aroma and fantastic flavor. There isn't anything more relaxing during a busy day than a coffee break with friends. In spite of the weather outside, change your kitchen for a while and try something new. My green cocktail is also an excellent way to wake up and restore energy. Add to it a pinch of curcuma powder, which brings comfort and acts as a buffer against autumn depression. Ingredients (for 2 people): 200ml of green tea 4 new kale leaves 1 green cucumber half an avocado 1 pear 1 banana pinch of salt pinch of curcuma Peel the avocado, pear and banana. Remove the core from the pear. Blend every ingredient very thoroughly. If the drink is too thick, add some green tea. Drink at once. Enjoy your drink!
  5. Kasia

    My Irish coffee

    My Irish Coffee Today the children will have to forgive me, but adults also sometimes want a little pleasure. This is a recipe for people who don't have to drive a car or work, i.e. for lucky people or those who can rest at the weekend. Irish coffee is a drink made with strong coffee, Irish Whiskey, whipped cream and brown sugar. It is excellent on cold days. I recommend it after an autumn walk or when the lack of sun really gets you down. Basically, you can spike the coffee with any whiskey, but in my opinion Jameson Irish Whiskey is the best for this drink. If you don't like whiskey, instead you can prepare another kind of spiked coffee: French coffee with brandy, Spanish coffee with sherry, or Jamaican coffee with dark rum. Ingredients (for 2 drinks) 300ml of strong, hot coffee 40ml of Jameson Irish Whiskey 150ml of 30% sweet cream 4 teaspoons of coarse brown sugar 1 teaspoon of caster sugar 4 drops of vanilla essence Put two teaspoons of brown sugar into the bottom of two glasses. Brew some strong black coffee and pour it into the glasses. Warm the whiskey and add it to the coffee. Whisk the sweet cream with the caster sugar and vanilla essence. Put it gently on top so that it doesn't mix with the coffee. Enjoy your drink!
  6. Today I would like to share with you the recipe for swift autumn cookies with French pastry and a sweet ginger-cinnamon-pear stuffing. Served with afternoon coffee they warm us up brilliantly and dispel the foul autumn weather. Ingredients (8 cookies) 1 pack of chilled French pastry 1 big pear 1 flat teaspoon of cinnamon 1 teaspoon of fresh grated ginger 2 tablespoons of brown sugar 1 teaspoon of vanilla sugar 2 tablespoons of milk Heat the oven up to 190C. Cover a baking sheet with some baking paper. Wash the pear, peel and cube it. Add the grated ginger, cinnamon, vanilla sugar and one tablespoon of the brown sugar. Mix them in. Cut 8 circles out of the French pastry. Cut half of every circle into parallel strips. Put the pear stuffing onto the other half of each circle. Roll up the cookies starting from the edges with the stuffing. Put them onto the baking paper and make them into cones. Smooth the top of the pastry with the milk and sprinkle with brown sugar. bake for 20-22 minutes. Enjoy your meal!
  7. joiei

    Judging Coffee

    I am going to have a chance to judge a professional barista and coffee brewer contest. Any suggestions for reading so I will be more knowledgeable before I get there?
  8. There have been many articles/studies published over the years regarding cafestol, a compound found in coffee, and its ability to raise cholesterol: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070614162223.htm (I'm sure you know which direction this is headed...) In a recently released study by Aarhus University Hospital, cafestol has been linked to a reduction in fasting glucose in mice. Naturally, this now means "cafestol may contribute to the reduced risk of developing T2D in coffee consumers and has a potential role as an antidiabetic drug." As of yesterday, the media is running wild with this latest breakthrough. I never went out of my way to avoid coffee that wasn't filtered through paper. But, I guess it was in the back of mind that the *occasional* extra pot of French press *might* be having some effect on my blood chemistry. As with all things, moderation is always the key. How about you? Will you break out the old percolator based on this news? Brew up a nice pot of cowboy coffee?
  9. cdh

    Nespresso

    I'm visiting a friend who has been singing the praises of his Nespresso machine to me for a while. At home I have the grinder and pump machine and had been a little skeptical that little plastic capsules could come close. My skepticism was a little irrational since I'd gotten a pod accepting machine for use at the office and had no problems with the coffee that came out of the Illy pods. So now I'm here, and so is the Nespresso machine and a half dozen different varieties of the little plastic pods. I'm actually somewhat impressed. The espresso comes out with a beautiful crema, and tastes like a well made shot. The different blends that I've tried so far have shown that there is certainly some diversity of selection. Not the same as if you had a home roasting setup and a broad selection of green beans to play with, but a nice breadth of flavor profiles is available. My one remaining argument against supporting the nespresso system is that it supports the Nescafe empire, with its tendency to view coffee as a bulk commodity and drive prices down to the point that some growers of unusual and interesting beans can't make a living doing so. Just my thoughts for the moment... pretty good coffee system made by a giant corporation.
  10. Shel_B

    Adding Salt to Coffee?

    A couple of weeks ago we had an event here at my apartment building. The woman who made the coffee told me that she added a small amount of salt to the freshly brewed coffee. I was stunned ... never heard of such a thing! A few days ago I was watching an old episode of Good Eats, and there was Alton adding a pinch of salt to his fresh-brewed French press coffee, saying that the salt reduces bitterness. Once again I was surprised. So, what's the story behind adding salt to fresh-brewed coffee? Is it done if the beans are mediocre or poorly roasted? Or when certain methods are used for brewing? Or is it just something people do because they heard about it and don't know better ... like how searing a steak seals in juices? Do you put salt in your coffee? Thanks!
  11. Shel_B

    Storing Whole Coffee Beans

    What is the best way, or at least some good ways, to store whole, recently roasted, coffee beans? I've gotten the beans home and put them into ball jars, and stored them in a cabinet near the coffee grinder. I've also just put the beans into the same cabinet in the bag that they were purchased in. I usually buy 1/2-lb of each type of bean at a time, usually buying two or three varieties per trip to the seller (usually Peet's, but other local roasters as well). Are there better ways to store the beans?
  12. What are the benefits and drawbacks to making coffee using the pourover method, especially, but not limited to, using a French press? How might some of the drawbacks be overcome?
  13. This is the third tea tasting of 2009 thanks to eGullet Society member Greg Glancy of Norbutea.com. This time around we will be tasting and discussing a 2008 shu (ripe) pu-erh, a classic 7572 recipe from Menghai Tea Factory in China. The samples were taken from a 357 gram beeng. Greg has provided five samples of 10 grams each that I will mail to the five eG Society members participating in this tasting. While the tasting is open to all members who have posted at least five substantive posts in the Coffee and Tea forum, preference will be given until midnight next Tuesday to those who did not participate in either of the two previous tastings of TGY Oolong and Imperial Dian Hong. Everyone is welcome to participate in the discussion, of course. So, please PM me if you would like to receive one of the the free samples and participate in the tasting and discussion. Here is some background information on this Menghai shu pu-ehr from Norbutea.com. (Copyright Norbutea. Used with permission.)
  14. Richard Kilgore

    Tea Tasting: 3 new sheng puerhs

    Experienced puerh drinker? Never tried puerh? Had a bad experience with puerh? Read on, because this Tea Tasting & Discussion may offer something for everyone. The purpose of this Tea Tasting & Discussion is to introduce members to puerh, as well as to give us the opportunity to compare the differences in three new 2010 sheng (raw) puerhs from different villages in the Yunnan province of China. David Collen at www.essenceoftea.co.uk is providing the three puerh tea samples. Essence of Tea 2010 Bangwai Village Essence of Tea 2010 Manmai Village Essence of Tea 2010 Mansai Village Sets of the samples will go to up to three eG members active in the forums: if you have at least 50 posts anywhere in the eG Forums in the past 12 months, or if you have at least 10 posts in the Coffee & Tea Forum and are interested in receiving the free samples and participating in this TT&D, please read on and then PM me. The Details The set of three puerh tea samples (10g each) will go to each of up to three eGullet Society members who will begin brewing, tasting, posting and discussing the teas within one week of receiving the samples. These teas may be brewed 1) "western style" using a small teapot or infuser cup, or 2) in a gaiwan or 3) in a Yixing tea pot. Please, no tea balls since they do not allow the loose leaves to open fully and infuse well. Brewing suggestions in an upcoming post. Initial preference will be given to eGullet Society members who have never received tea samples and participated in a Tea Tasting & Discussion, and who have at least 50 posts anywhere in the eG Forums in the past year. This preference will last until midnight Friday, November 12, 2010 Eastern Time, US. If that sounds like you, please PM me ASAP. Others who have previously participated, may PM me their interest at any time. If you have any questions at all, please feel free to PM me.
  15. TeraMisu

    Flavor shots for hot beverages

    I brew coffee, tea and cocoa beans. Seeking suggestions on suppliers of quality flavorings - examples: almond, vanilla, mint. caramel, coconut, pineapple etc. Most of what I find has an overwhelming taste of alcohol, glycerin or artificial flavorings or sweeteners - or just plainly too much sweet, not much added flavor....really not crazy about anything too sweet. Can anyone make any recommendations? perhaps part of the problem is most of what I find is intended to flavor either baked goods or snowcones! LOL thank you.
  16. "Maths sheds light on perfect cup of coffee" (BBC article)
  17. fisherPete

    I might be a coffee snob

    I buy green beans wholesale (Sumatra Mandheling), which I roast in my Jiffy hot-air popcorn maker (Full City - just at second crack). I grind in my Breville BCG800XL burr grinder to very fine. Then I brew in my Krups Type 229 Aroma Control machine with the thermocouple in the basket which drips into an insulated carafe. I've been doing this for many years. Do I need professional help? I tried what they call coffee at the corner convenience store, but it tasted like cardboard. Does that make me a snob, or a connoisseur?
  18. I just got back from Paris, and loved the coffee in the cafes. I know it's espresso, but is there any particular brand(s) they use that would be available in the US? Any tips on making the perfect cafe creme?
  19. I had a request for a coffee flavored bon bon. I am not a coffee fan, so I've never made anything with it. I've seen two types of recipes - one that infuses the cream with the beans and one that uses brewed coffee. I'm curious which type of recipe is used by most people here. If you infuse the cream, are you straining the beans out or are you using a fine enough grind to not create textural problems in the ganache? If you use brewed coffee, are you reducing the cream by the amount of the coffee liquid on a one to one basis? Thanks!
  20. The fact that I call them idiots is my opinion only. YMMV. But on this video, which attempts to show you how to brew great coffee at home, they leave out perhaps the most important thing about brewing great coffee at home. That is, if you consider what makes up about 95% of coffee important. Yes, folks, as often said on smart sites, like eGullet, and Tasty Travails, they say nothing about starting with good tasting water. (They also don't pour water through the filters first, which I also believe is important. Enjoy. https://youtu.be/IjXhQaV56GA?list=PLUeEVLHfB5-Rxp6-IYL1Xxb_SHl5FnhrQ
  21. byarvin

    Home Coffee Roasting

    Hello out there! Like everybody else, I've been reading the Fat Guy's home coffee roasting posts, and it makes me wonder....who else besides him (and me!) are roasting out there? I've been doing it about a year and I roast around a pound a week using either a Hearthware roaster (in the garage) or a converted stovetop corn popper. Surely there must be more of you out there! Green beans and equipment are snatched right up on Ebay, and there are all sorts of websites for this. I can't be the only home roaster in New Jersey...or could I?
  22. Craig Camp

    The Pleasures of Moka

    While our well traveled espresso machine is once again on a ship back to Italy, our coffee at home comes from our well seasoned moka. While everyone likes to talk about espresso very little attention is given this simple machine which is used by most Italians at home. The truth is given care and with a little practice moka makes a wonderful coffee - all for about Euro 18.00. What I have discovered is that for my morning coffee - I usually don't take a capuccino unless I am in a bar and never in hot weather - I tend to prefer the round rich taste of the moka coffee. It seems more of a beverage than the quick short short of espresso and it is much better to dunk your cookies in. It is a shame the moka is marketed outside of Italy as a 'stovetop espresso maker' because it is not. Moka is its own style of coffee.
  23. Ideally has anyone got any experience? I want it to have a slightly retro feel, so was hoping to get hold of one of these; Citroen 2CV Van and then put the machines in the back? Also has anyone got restaurant/coffee shop experience with Espresso machines? The 2/3/4 head machines would look better in the back, but this site; Brackins Bar recommends going for a couple of single head machines in case the boiler goes so you can still keep serving... How likely is that? Many thanks for any ideas and help in advance! Angie
  24. I read somewhere in a book on Chinease Energy medicine that Pu Ehr tea works like grapefruit juice in your system clearing away fats etc. I enjoy this tea as a substitute for coffee . Does anyone know anymore about it? I usally buy a medium grade that my pocketbook can afford. Some of the other grades seem a little pricey.
  25. Our office coffee is about like that of most offices - not good, and the longer it sits on the burner, the worse it gets. I just need a cup or two in the morning; I don't drink coffee all day long. I don't want to bring in my own coffee maker, and I don't have room for one in my office, anyway. I saw a box of the K-cups on the grocery shelf the other day and it occurred to me that it MIGHT be possible to simply dump the contents of one into a cup, add hot water, and have a pretty good cup of coffee. Obviously, one would have to try it to know for sure; but my question is: Is there something about the machine's brewing process that . . .how do I want to put it. . .means that the whole is greater than the sum of the parts? Or would it be a reasonable assumption that simply combining the contents of the K-cup and nearly-boiling water in a mug, would produce about as good a cup of coffee as the machine itself?
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