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Found 351 results

  1. liuzhou

    Breakfast 2019

    First breakfast of the year, on a freezing morning. 三鲜馄饨 (sān xiān hún tún) Home made three taste wontons (pork, shrimp and shiitake) in a spicy broth. Photos taken through a filter of steam.
  2. Have we had a serious breakfast-cereal thread yet? I know we had the retro-cereal discussion about a year ago http://forums.egullet.org/ibf/index.php?ac...t=ST&f=1&t=3161 but have we talked through all the major cereal issues? Do you like cereal? Do you add anything to it? Do you eat it for breakfast, or at other times? Do you eat it with milk? Do you use it in recipes? What are your favorites? I don't eat much cereal because it strikes me as the culinary equivalent of hanging around all day in your underwear and doing nothing (though I have been known to exhibit this behavior on occasion) but today I sampled some Special K "Red Berries." As an inexperienced cereal eater I was astounded at how sweet the stuff was. Silly me, I thought Special K was one of the non-sugary, wholesome cereals. The cereal itself is a combination of the sugar taste and some sort of vague grainy taste -- almost malt-like -- plus there are what seem to be freeze-dried strawberry slices in there. The strawberries are pretty good when reconstituted in milk. It led me to wonder whether any pastry chefs are playing with freeze dried fruit and its possibilities. But as for the cereal, it was lame and left a nasty aftertaste.
  3. I developed this recipe for a friend who wound up with many cans of Solo brand apricot filling and was wondering what to make with them. I adapted this recipe from Rose Levy Beranbaum's Sour Cream Coffee Cake, found on page 90 of the Cake Bible. The apricot filling works it way down through the cake and winds up near the bottom of the pan, making an attractive top later when the cake is inverted. Please use some sort of ring pan that holds at least 9 cups. You may substitute butter for the toasted almond oil, but remember that the oil adds flavor. I specifically developed this recipe with the home cook in mind, regular salted butter, and AP flour work well here. To reduce the sodium, use unsalted butter. Ingredients 113 grams (1 stick) salted butter 26 grams toasted almond oil 200 grams sugar 6 grams vanilla extract 4 egg yolks 160 grams regular sour cream (do not use low fat or fat free) 50 grams almond meal 175 grams all-purpose flour 2 1/2 grams baking powder 2 1/2 grams baking soda 12 ounces (1 can) Solo Apricot Filling 12 Servings Preheat the oven to 350° Spray a 9+ cup tube or Bundt pan with non-stick spray or grease with an oil & soy lecithin blend. Lightly toast the almond meal in a frying pan on the stove top until it has a light beige color and has a mild fragrance. Allow to cool. Cream together the butter, oil, and sugar. Add the vanilla and egg yolks, mix until the mixture is even and creamy. Add the sour cream and mix well. Add the cooled almond flour and mix well. Sift together the flour, baking powder and baking soda. Add the dry ingredients to the liquid mixture and mix until it everything is evenly incorporated. Do not overmix the batter. Place 2/3 of the batter evenly in the prepared pan. Place the apricot filling in an even layer on top, keeping a small space between the filling and the pan's edges. Place the remaining batter on top and smooth to create a relatively even surface. Bake for approximately 50 minutes at 350° or until the top is dark brown and springs back to a light touch. Allow to cool for 15 minutes. Invert the pan onto a serving plate. Cool and serve. Be cautious about serving this hot, as the apricot filling can cause serious burns. When fully cooled, cover or wrap in plastic wrap to store. Will keep for several days in a cool, dry place. Nutrition (thanks MasterCook!) 324 calories, 15g fat, (7g sat fat, 6g mono-unsat fat, 1g ploy-unsat fat), 5g protein, 43g carbohydrates, 175mg sodium, 101mg potassium, 58g calcium 42% calories from fat, 52% calories from carbohydrates, 6% calories from protein
  4. Pancakes get a lot of love around here. Of course, there is The pancake topic to end all pancake topics, plus also Pancakes, how do I love thee? , Pancakes, Waffles, French Toast: Pick One., and more. But I think that blueberry pancakes are both unique enough in construction, and just awesome enough in general, to warrant a separate discussion. One of the tricks with blueberry pancakes is that their minimum thickness is governed by the size of the berries: if you have big berries, you are going to wind up with thick pancakes. I find this necessitates some changes to the batter structure so that you achieve the best texture. I also like to skip any vanilla extract, but add a little (or sometimes A LOT) of lemon zest. What are your thoughts on blueberry pancakes? How do they differ from your normal pancake recipe, if they differ?
  5. After a delightful brunch at Koslow's Sqirl restaurant in Los Angeles, I've decided to attempt to cook through her cookbook. I'll post my results here. Please follow along and join in, if you're so inclined. Her food is wonderful, but I will surmise that her true deliciousness comes from using the best and freshest ingredients. I'll do my best to recreate the magic I felt at Sqirl. Here's the link to her book at Eat Your Books.
  6. George Jetson, this one's for you: https://thespoon.tech/the-founder-of-reviewed-com-wants-to-reinvent-cooking-with-robot-cooking-appliance/
  7. I think today was possibly the first time I've ever made French toast. I don't think it came out all that well. Eggy, soggy, not flavorful. Can I get a quick tutorial on the basic method? I've searched older topics that cover French toast but they're generally a lot more ambitious than what I'm looking to learn right now. I just want the basics on how to make French toast that isn't lousy.
  8. ALMOND CUSCUS WITH CRANBERRIES AND PINEAPPLE I hate getting up in the morning. My household knows that before 8 o'clock I'm unbearable, and because almost every day I wake up much earlier, I tend to be unbearable more frequently than I want. Every extra five minutes of sleep is priceless, so I appreciate a good breakfast that is not too complicated and is quick to prepare. Recently, I have been preparing breakfast with groats and flakes. This time I chose cuscus. This product is a cross between pasta and groats, and it doesn't need long to prepare. It is enough to add hot water or milk and leave for a few minutes. I added some fresh pineapple, cranberries and banana. I spiced it up with some hot chili pepper . Ingredients (for 2 people) 125g of cuscus 400ml of almond milk 1 tablespoon of honey 1 teaspoon of vanilla essence 2 slices of fresh pineapple 1 teaspoon of minced chili pepper 150g of fresh cranberries 2 tablespoons of brown sugar 1 banana 4 tablespoons of flaked almonds Wash the cranberries and put them into a pot. Add two tablespoons of water and the brown sugar. Boil, stirring gently until the cranberries burst and the sauce has thickened. Boil the almond milk with the vanilla essence. Pour the milk onto the cuscus and leave for 5-7 minutes. Slice the banana and roast the almond flakes. Peel the pineapple and dice it. Mix the pineapple, chili pepper and honey. Add the pineapple to the cuscus and mix it in. Put the mixture into two bowls. Put the cranberries and banana on the top and sprinkle with the almond flakes. Enjoy your meal!
  9. LUNCH FROM THE JAR, I.E. LAYERED SALAD IN THE OFFICE Most of us take lunch boxes to the office. Some lucky people can warm their food up at work The rest have to eat sandwiches. Sandwiches are great, but even if we absolutely love them we could get fed up with them in the end. Regardless of where we work we can save the situation with salads. Every day we can prepare a different one and we have an entirely new lunch. If we also take an attractive dish, we have something that is not only tasty but also glamorous. I would like to share with you the recipe for a salad which looks equally as beautiful as it is yummy. The chickpeas and groats make it a satisfying and balanced meal, after which we won't be hungry. I think that if you prepare your lunch in the morning and plan to eat it at lunchtime, we should keep the salad and the dip separately. Otherwise, after a few hours in the jar, we have an unappetising dish with squishy lettuce, which isn't what we want, is it? Ingredients (for 2 people) 1 beetroot 200g of tinned chickpeas 100g of bulgur 1 carrot 1 fresh green pepper 4 lettuce leaves 200g of natural yoghurt handful of minced chives 1 small chili pepper salt and pepper Clean the beetroot and bake or boil it. Grate the beetroot and carrot. Cut the pepper into thin strips. Boil the bulgur in salty water. Arrange in layers in a jar the beetroot, chickpeas, pepper, bulgur, carrot and lettuce. Dice the chili pepper. Mix the natural yoghurt with the chives and chili pepper. Spice it up with salt and pepper. Add the dip to the salad just before serving.
  10. Ellen Shapiro

    Waffles!

    I'm thinking to haul out a wedding-present-waffle-iron, never opened never used in this century, but can hardly remember anything about waffle-making. What to do? Are there tricks, tips, better and worse recipes, issues, factions, schools of thought? (Related topic: waffle irons)
  11. I need a waffle iron. I've seen various types out there but the really kool ones seem to be those with reversible plates that you can use for panini and other foods you squish. Also it seems to me that it would be easier to have an iron with removable plates, for cleaning purposes. So, bring on the personal opinions. What kind of coating works best? Which models crank out the crispest, fluffiest versions? Which one should you have just left on the shelf?
  12. Omelette with courgette and tomato salsa. Today I added a bit of chili pepper to tomato-basil salsa. Because it was quite spicy I decided to add it to a mild dish. I prepared an omelette with courgette and goat cheese. The salsa added an excellent piquancy to it. I recommend this dish for a fast and light meal. Ingredients: omelette 3 eggs 150g of courgette 3-4 slices of goat cheese 2 tablespoons of milk 1 tablespoon of flour 1 tablespoon of butter salt and pepper salsa 2 tomatoes 3 tablespoons of minced basil quarter of an onion 2 cloves of garlic half a chili pepper 3 tablespoons of olive oil 2 tablespoons of lemon juice 1 teaspoon of honey Start by preparing the salsa. Cube the tomato and dice the garlic, onion and chili pepper. Mix the vegetables together. Make a sauce with the olive oil, lemon juice and honey. Add it to the vegetables and mix it in. Leave in the fridge. Slice the courgette very thin. Whisk the eggs with the milk and add the flour. Spice it up with salt and pepper. Melt the butter in a pan. Pour half the egg mass into it and fry for a while at medium heat. Arrange half of the courgette slices on top along with the slices of goat cheese and the rest of the courgette. Pour the rest of the egg mass onto it and fry it. When the eggs have congealed, turn the omelette upside down and fry for a few seconds. Serve at once with the tomato salsa. Enjoy your meal!
  13. Holiday brunch. During the holiday, eating is a waste of time for my children. Although breakfast should be a balanced and calm meal, at this time it is eaten quickly and carelessly. Sometimes I need to wrest my children away from their play and nourish their young bodies with brunch. Today I would like to share with you the recipe for a very simple egg and vegetable brunch. Though my children like all vegetables, the look of the food made them anxious. Only the soft boiled eggs settled them down and got them eating. After a while there were two empty glasses in the dishwasher and my children could go back to playing. It was good, because the holiday is almost over. Ingredients (for 3 people) half an onion 2 cloves of garlic 1 tablespoon of butter 300g of courgette 1 red pepper 2 tomatoes 2 sprigs of rosemary 2 sprigs of thyme 3 tablespoons of minced chives 3 eggs Dice the onion and garlic and fry them in butter. Remove the core from the tomatoes. Cube the courgette, tomatoes and red pepper. Put one of the cubed tomatoes to one side. Add the second tomato and the rest of the vegetables to the onion and stew on a low heat for 10 minutes. Boil some water and carefully put the eggs into the water. Boil for 5 minutes. Cool them down and carefully remove the shell. Mix the stewed vegetables in with the rest of the tomato. Spice it up with salt and pepper. Put the vegetables into a cup. Arrange the eggs on top and cut them up with a sharp knife. Spice up the egg with salt and pepper and sprinkle with the chives. Serve at once. Enjoy your meal!
  14. Raspberry porridge Today, I used the best part of my raspberry shopping for my summer second breakfast. I recommend it for those who only drink coffee in the morning. The rolled oats and chia seeds ensure that it satisfies our hunger very well, and the empty bowl means that you are sorry the dish was so small. The inspiration for this dish comes from "Smaki życia" ("Flavour of Life") by Agnieszka Maciąg. Ingredients: 100g of raspberries 3 teaspoons of honey 3 tablespoons of rolled oats 2 teaspoons of chia seeds decoration 3 teaspoons of natural yoghurt raspberries, blueberries, banana slices, cashews, sesame seeds Mix together the rolled oats with the chia seeds, pour in some hot water and leave for 20 minutes. Wash the raspberries and drain them. Leave a few nice bits of fruit for decoration. Blend the rest of the raspberries with the rolled oats, chia seeds and honey. Put it into a small bowl. Put the natural yoghurt on top. Decorate with the banana slices, blueberries, raspberries, sesame seeds and cashews.
  15. I made a Dutch baby pancake today and on a whim I added a couple dashes of Angostura. The effect was subtle but I think improved the dish, which can be cloyingly sweet with maple syrup. Anyone else tried bitters in their bakegoods? Any thoughts?
  16. It's possible I'm the last to hear about this trick, or perhaps it's really as clever as it seemed to me when I saw it yesterday. I was at a street fair for my son's school and one of the booths was selling pancakes. The chef/owner of the restaurant Kitchenette was cooking pancakes on a charcoal grill. Rather than using a cast-iron skillet or heavy cast-iron griddle, she had laid several inverted aluminum sheet pans over the grill and was using those as a griddle surface. The pancakes came out great, so the idea is valid at least in this application. Not-great cell-phone photo:
  17. In discussions with a colleague, I was shocked...SHOCKED...to learn that neither he nor his wife eats breakfast before leaving the house in the morning. Now I know there are certain clichés that are just not worth repeating; but frankly, I feel that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. I basically always have breakfast, and always make breakfast for my wife, when we're in the same city. And I'm not talking about coffee = breakfast. I make oatmeal or some other hot cereal, cut up fruit, scramble eggs, whole wheat toast, whatever...it's breakfast. And for me, it's necessary, otherwise I start to feel like crap within an hour or two. So, seriously, do you skip breakfast? Why?
  18. We are planning a trip to NVA in a couple of weekends are are hoping to go to my sister's for breakfast on the Sunday. I'd like to find something besides WF where I can get some really good breakfast pastries to take to contribute. I know that every time I go home I spot a dozen bakeries that look interesting, but I can't remember one now! Thanks for the help!
  19. I'm flying into Newcastle with some friends next week, and spending the night in Durham before heading to the Pennines for a week. Can anyone recommend anywhere for a good breakfast? I'm thinking primarily of a good fry-up (I've only had one since I moved to Germany two years ago), but preferably somewhere where they take more care than in the average greasy spoon. And other suggestions are also very much appreciated, if the food makes a visit worthwhile. Alternatively, since we're not pushed for time and have use of a relatively well-equipped kitchen, can anyone recommend a good butcher's or other source of good-quality eggs and meat? It's years since I had a good-quality, oatmeal-based black pudding. In both cases, recommendations in easy reach (by foot) of the city centre would be much appreciated.
  20. A group of us does Father's Day brunch. Previously we've gone to The Restaurant in Hackensack (great), Arthur's Landing (great; still sad about them closing), Chart House (very good). We're thinking of Essex County this year. One of the group does not like The Manor so any other interesting ideas for a really nice brunch spot?
  21. Cottage Cheese Pancakes Serves 4 as Main Dish. I'm not fond of the fluffy kind of pancakes which absorb too much syrup. These are very tender and delicate. I use Breakstone 2% or 4% fat small curd cottage cheese. These are also great for Atkins or other low carb diets. By my count, 11 grams carbs per 3-pancake serving, using 1/4 C. batter per pancake. Add additional carbs depending on the topping. 1 c cottage cheese 6 large eggs 6 T flour 6 T melted butter Pinch salt Combine all ingredients in food processor and process until smooth. Bake on griddle or iron skillet over medium or medium high heat until cooked on both sides. I usually serve with Blueberry-Orange Sauce made by cooking fresh or frozen blueberries in orange juice and sweetening to taste Keywords: Breakfast, Brunch ( RG919 )
  22. Eggnog French Toast I think I read about this in a Gourmet Magazine. It is rich and I must make it once a year. Use your favorite french toast bread. I prefer bigger slices. I also like the bread to be one day old, slightly on the drier side. I made this by longer soaking and a quick soak. I prefer the quick soak in the eggnog. Simply purchase your favorite eggnog store brand. I go with the most fat content always. Slice and dip your bread in the eggnog mixture. Heat a pan with a light layer of oil, and slightly brown both sides. I love the way it carmelizes. Keywords: Easy, Breakfast ( RG796 )
  23. If you had the option of one breakfast in Manhattan - where would it be? Barney Greengrass?
  24. Semolina breakfast porridge with egg yolks A typical Estonian breakfast dish. 2 T butter 1 l milk 100 ml semolina (Cream of Wheat) 1/2 tsp salt 2 egg yolks 4 tsp caster sugar Heat butter in a heavy saucepan (this keeps the milk from burning). Add milk, bring gently to simmer. Pour in semolina in a thin stream, stirring vigorously, as to avoid clumps. Simmer in a low heat for 10 minutes, stirring every now and then, until the porridge thickens. Whisk egg yolks with sugar until combined. Take the saucepan from the heat, whisk inn the egg yolk and sugar mixture. Serve at once. Especially nice with wild strawberry jam! Keywords: Breakfast, Easy ( RG2031 )
  25. On saturday we had a couple fairly authentic belgian waffles from La Bonte on 17th south of Sansom. The photo is one with pecans inside. The sesame seed looking things are belgian sugar. It's not pearl sugar that you will find in some places in belgium but the cook said it was another kind of belgian sugar. In belgium you get these handed to you in a little paper condom like a small fry from McNausea. It was a bit hard to cut with a knife and fork so I just picked it up in my impeccably clean fingers. They are made from a yeast dough and not a batter so the texture is not what Americans expect when you say waffle - sort of like that thing in Chicago that resembles my cat's litter box is not what I expect a pizza to be. The waffle is crispy and chewy. You don't need syrup. They have various things to work into the waffle. We also had a dark chocolate and strawberry waffle. (you see chunks of each in the waffle). I was hungry and one of them did it for me. ps I've seen reviews about awful service here. The guy with the beard who was at the counter and made our waffles was as nice as he could be. I had no complaints about the service.
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