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Found 349 results

  1. jsolomon

    Early Morning Quaffs

    So, I'm on the home stretch of a rather lengthy, and career deciding application: medical school. All I'm doing right now is sitting at home putting in some drudge work to finalize it. But, it's also ~10:20 a.m. and I'm just about ready to start my second beer. What is too early to start drinking beer, and why? I think the earliest I've ever started in was about 7:30 a.m. when I was camping... unless you count a few times when I saw the sun come up 'cos I was still at the beer. No, mothers, this is not a healthy or socially acceptible topic. Moderator, kill it if it's not appropriate.
  2. Will be staying in the 2nd, near the Place de Madeline. Disappointed my last breakfast at La Duree(way too expensive, and service non existent). What other good cafe's are nearby that have wonderful breakfast pastry/cafe/ ambiance? Thanks
  3. dbrociner

    Easter Brunch

    Anyone know a good place for Easter Brunch in Morris, Somerset, Union, or Essex counties? I realize that this is like going out on Mother's Day but hey, short of converting my wife's entire family to Judaism (oy, my parents would be thrilled! ) this is what I've got to deal with. I do have a reservation for the North Maple Inn in Basking Ridge but I'm open to suggestions.
  4. Mssmltzr

    Breakfast Casserole

    My boyfriend has expressed interest in cooking and I am doing my best to encourage it. He wants his first project to be a breakfast casserole. It needs to be very, very basic. Nothing that includes too many "fru fru" ingredients that may intimidate him. I really just need a recipe that works well for throwing stuff into a dish and sticking it in the oven. A good recipe to build upon--so he can eventually make it his own. Anyone have any tried-and-true recipes that they don't mind sharing? Thanks for the help!
  5. ruthcooks

    Cottage Cheese Pancakes

    Cottage Cheese Pancakes Serves 4 as Main Dish. I'm not fond of the fluffy kind of pancakes which absorb too much syrup. These are very tender and delicate. I use Breakstone 2% or 4% fat small curd cottage cheese. These are also great for Atkins or other low carb diets. By my count, 11 grams carbs per 3-pancake serving, using 1/4 C. batter per pancake. Add additional carbs depending on the topping. 1 c cottage cheese 6 large eggs 6 T flour 6 T melted butter Pinch salt Combine all ingredients in food processor and process until smooth. Bake on griddle or iron skillet over medium or medium high heat until cooked on both sides. I usually serve with Blueberry-Orange Sauce made by cooking fresh or frozen blueberries in orange juice and sweetening to taste Keywords: Breakfast, Brunch ( RG919 )
  6. Gail CDM

    Mother's Day Brunch

    I am going to prepare Brunch for around 150 people. Will be a combination of breakfast / brunch items as well as main entree, to include starch, vegetables, breads / muffins, fruit, cheese and an array of fabulous desserts. Suggestions / great combinations would be muchly appreciated.
  7. I will be staying this weekend in Bayhead at the Gables bed and breakfast. Would like suggestions on a brunch place not to far away. Grenville isn't an option my niece works there and i don;t like the stories i hear on food prep. The Old Mill Inn i understand has been done over and is good. Any thoughts on that one?
  8. Varmint

    Cooking with Breakfast Cereal

    I had to get into the office early this morning, so I scarfed down a quick bowl of raisin bran. As I was eating, I started to wonder whether any breakfast cereals could be used in cooking high-end meals. Now I'm not talking about corn flake crusted fried chicken or rice krispie treats. I'm wondering, how Grant Achatz would used puffed rice or shredded wheat?? Could Steve Klc make something interesting with Cap'n Crunch or Apple Jacks? There's got to be tons of possibilities out there (perhaps none of them worthwhile), but if chefs can do something creative with the concept of caramel corn, why not with Honey Nut Cheerios??
  9. Arsenic

    Breakfast Waffles

    Thinking of going for Belgian Waffles this holiday Monday - anyone have some suggestions? (For brunch, so Chambar is out of the question ) I'm in Burnaby so some nearby ideas would be great, but willing to travel!
  10. I'm going to Baltimore on Friday and Saturday to do research for a brewery/bar guidebook. I'm bar-hopping to exhaustion Friday night (fatigue, not pass-out, I gotta stay sober enough to take notes), and I'm going to need lots of really great coffee and a rib-sticking breakfast Saturday morning. So...what's the best non-chain place in Baltimore for breakfast? I want coffee, and biscuits, and shellfish, and pie, and maybe some local breakfast favorite I'm not aware of. And I would rather starve than eat at Denny's or some other damned chain restaurant pit. Educate me, hon!
  11. Anything_but_liver

    Turkey French Toast and More

    Maybe I don't get out very much but I found the following recipe suggestions for leftover Turkey Day food pretty funny and original. Recipes courtesy of my husband's employer, Nino Salvaggio. RECIPES: “The Day After” Thanksgiving COSMO Smoothie “Crispy Creamy” Potato Cakes with Corn Turkey French Toast Turkey, Stuffing & Corn Croquettes Turkey, Green Bean & Mushroom Strudel Sweet Potato/Candied Yam Bisque ==================================== “The Day After” Thanksgiving COSMO Smoothie INGREDIENTS: 1 cup Ice 1/2 cup Cranberry Sauce / Any Kind 1 1/2 oz. Vodka 1/2 oz. Grand Marnier or (Triple Sec) 1 Lemon Twist =================== DIRECTIONS: 1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend on highest speed until smooth. Pour into a chilled glass. Garnish with a lemon twist. 2. Finish cleaning up the house and storing left overs. SERVING INFO: Yields approximately 1- 12 ounce drink ============================= Turkey, Stuffing & Corn Croquettes INGREDIENTS: Don’t let the name “croquettes” scare you, this is not some difficult “French” recipe. In the end, you’re making fancy “Tater-Tots”, nothing more, nothing less. The real appeal of this recipe is that you can make them well in advance, freeze them, and cook them up anytime you have a craving for the flavor of “Thanksgiving” which you’ll discover in each bite of this delicious recipe. 2 cups Sage Bread Stuffing 1 Cup Cooked Turkey, cut in ½ inch pieces 1/2 cup Cooked Corn Kernels 1/4 cup Turkey Gravy 2 Eggs, beaten 3 to 4 cups Bread Crumbs, Fresh or Dry 1 cup Flour 1 Egg 1/2 cup Milk 2 Tbsp. Butter DIRECTIONS: 1. In a mixing bowl, combine bread stuffing, cooked turkey, corn, gravy and eggs. Stir and fold gently so as not to make a gluey paste. 2. Once ingredients are combined. Portion into 3 inch diameter patties approximately 1 inch thick on waxed paper or plastic wrap. 3. Freeze patties over night or for at least 2 to 3 hours to firm. 4. In a bowl, beat milk and egg together to make an egg wash. 5. In 2 other separate bowls, have (1), the flour, which you may season with salt and pepper, and (2) the bread crumbs. You now have 3 separate bowls. One with egg wash, one with flour, and another with bread crumbs. 6. Bread the frozen patties by first coating with flour, then soaking in the milk & egg wash, then dredging (coating) with the bread crumbs. 7. Heat a skillet / fry pan with the butter and sauté the patties until golden brown on both sides. Place the patties on a cookie sheet and place in a pre-heated 400 F oven for 10 to 15 minutes or until heated through. ==================== Turkey, Green Bean & Mushroom Strudel INGREDIENTS: 3 cups Turkey Meat, Cooked, Cut in ½ inch pieces 1 cup Bread Stuffing 2 cups Green Bean & Mushroom Casserole 8 sheets (10" x 15" size) Phyllo Dough 2 sticks Butter, melted DIRECTIONS: 1. In a mixing bowl, combine turkey, bread stuffing and green bean casserole mixture. 2. On a flat, clean surface or cutting board, layer 4 sheets of phyllo dough, brushing each layer with melted butter before placing the next layer on top. 3. After 4 sheets of buttered phyllo layers have been created, portion ½ of the turkey mixture or approximately 3 cups of mixture in a pipe like shape, 8 inches long on top of the 10 inch width end of the phyllo layers, leaving approximately 1 to 1 ½ inches of space at each side of the turkey mix. 4. Roll phyllo forward, creating a log shape, tucking the ends in as you roll the log forward. 5. In the end, the turkey mixture should be fully encased in phyllo and the log shape, closed at each end. 6. Place the strudel “log” on a buttered cookie sheet and place in a pre-heated 400 F oven for approximately 20 to 30 minutes or until medium brown and heated through. Remove from the oven. Allow to rest 10 minutes. SERVING INFO: Yields Approximately 2 - 8 inch Strudels or 6 to 8 Servings GREAT WITH: Slice and serve with Turkey Gravy. ============= Turkey French Toast INGREDIENTS: 2 cups Bread Stuffing 2 cups Cooked Turkey, Cut in ½ inch pieces 1 cup Milk 2 Eggs, Beaten Salt & Pepper To Taste EGG BATTER 4 Eggs, Beaten 1/2 cup Milk 1/4 cup Flour, All Purpose 2 Tbsp. Butter DIRECTIONS: 1. Line a standard, 9” x 4” bread loaf pan with either the paper wrappers from sticks of butter or margarine (Butter side facing outward) or spray pan with non-stick vegetable spray. 2. In a mixing bowl, combine stuffing, turkey, eggs, milk and seasoning and pour mixture into prepared loaf pan. 3. Pre-heat oven to 350 F and place loaf in a casserole dish. Pour water into base of casserole dish to create a ¼ inch depth water bath. Place pan into the oven, uncovered. 4. Bake until custard is firm. (Approximately 45 to 60 minutes). Remove pan from the oven and cool. 5. Carefully turn loaf out of the pan and cut into 1 inch thick slices. 6. Make egg batter by beating together eggs, milk and flour. 7. Pre-heat oven to 400 F. 8. Heat butter in sauté pan or skillet over medium heat. Dip slices of Turkey Loaf in egg batter and place in the skillet. Fry on both sides until medium brown. 9. Place pan fried slices on baking sheet and place in the oven 10 to 15 minutes or until thoroughly heated through. Serve. SERVING INFO: Yields Approximately 8 – 1 Inch Slices or 4 Portions =============== Sweet Potato/Candied Yam Bisque INGREDIENTS: 2 cups Cooked Sweet Potato / Candied Yams 2 cups Chicken Broth or Stock 1 cup Heavy Cream Salt & Pepper To Taste 1 cup Bread Stuffing 24 Sage Leaves, Fresh 1/2 cup Vegetable Oil DIRECTIONS: 1. Starting with cold ingredients, puree in a blender, cooked sweet potato/candied yam, chicken broth/stock and cream. 2. Strain pureed mixture in to a medium sauce pan and bring up to a slow simmer, stirring often. 3. Adjust thickness to your preference with chicken broth and season with salt and pepper to taste. (Keep warm for service). 4. Heat a small sauce pan with the oil until 350 F or just before smoking. Add fresh sage leaves and toss in the hot oil until all the steam has been released and the sage leaves are crispy (About 30 seconds). Remove the crispy leaves with a slotted spoon or wire skimmer and drain on absorbent paper towel. Reserve for later garnishment. 5. Heat bread stuffing in a microwave container and portion a ¼ cup of the hot stuffing in the center of a soup bowl. 6. Portion one cup of the hot soup in the bowl around the perimeter of the centered stuffing portion. 7. Sprinkle the crisp fried sage leaves on top of the soup. Serve. SERVING INFO: Yield 5 cups or 4 portions ============= “Crispy Creamy” Potato Cakes with Corn INGREDIENTS: 4 cups Chilled, Mashed Potatoes 1 cup Cooked, Corn Kernels 3 Egg Yolks Salt & Pepper To Taste 3 cups Idaho Potato, Raw, Peeled, Shredded or fine Julienne 1/4 to 1/2 Cup Vegetable Oil (For pan Frying) DIRECTIONS: 1. In a mixing bowl, combine mashed potatoes, corn, egg yolks and season with salt & pepper. 2. On a clean surface, arrange a 3 inch diameter, ¼ inch thick portion, of shredded or julienne raw potato. 3. Portion approximately ¼ cup of mashed potato on top of the raw potato and fashion into a round disk like shape, approximately one inch thick. 4. Nest another 3 inch diameter of raw potatoes on top of this cake to create a “sandwich” of raw potato, mashed potato and raw potato. 5. Repeat with the remainder of the potato products. 6. Heat a skillet or fry pan over medium heat, with the vegetable oil. 7. Pan fry the potato cakes each side until medium brown and crispy. The mashed potato in the middle should be fully re-heated. 8. Drain each cake on absorbent paper towel, Season with salt and serve warm. SERVING INFO: Yields Approximately 8 servings
  12. I'm always looking for cool dishes and I've had some tasty breakfast items in Latin America. I'm not sure I liked breakfast until I ate it in Latin America. Interested in anything from your favorite pan dulces to chilaquiles to cachapas. Whatever. If you want to include a recipe, that's cool. But if you just want to give a brief description I'll try to find a recipe that matches. Thanks.
  13. marge201

    brunch in Essex County

    A group of us does Father's Day brunch. Previously we've gone to The Restaurant in Hackensack (great), Arthur's Landing (great; still sad about them closing), Chart House (very good). We're thinking of Essex County this year. One of the group does not like The Manor so any other interesting ideas for a really nice brunch spot?
  14. silverbrow

    Breakfast in paris

    I'm looking for somewhere great for breakfast in Paris. I don't mind where in the city it is - have metro, will travel - but I'd like a great breakfast that will see me through until at least a mid-morning snack. I'm not staying in Paris, I'm just there for the day and will be flying into CdG. I'm more interested in focusing on great croissant or similar, rather than a cooked breakfast (which I understand isn't very French anyway??) and somewhere where I can sit down, rather where I'm forced to take it away.
  15. I will be near Junior's for breakfast tomorrow. Never been. I did a search and couldn't find any comments relating to what to eat at Juniors other than cheesecake. Any suggestions? When do they stop serving breakfast?
  16. I'm having my annual Not Holiday brunch on Sunday--people just drop in and visit--we have mimosas to drink. I have to keep it do ahead because once people start arriving I can't be cooking--so I just put out a buffet table. I'm serving a ham this year and I usually make overnight French toast-- I call it Cuban French toast because the recipe is from my friend Nieves, who's Cuban--but i don't know if it actually is Cuban--but i wanted to do something different. I found this recipe in Epicurious http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/238006 haven't really looked at it yet, but the flavor combo sounds good. Or I could possibly so some sort of strata--not the traditional one, but i've seen fancier recipes for this--or maybe a fritatta or two...or a grits casserole.... I'll make a fruit platter, have some cheeses and salamis, some muffins and tea breads--but if you have anything that you make that works for you, I'm all ears! Zoe
  17. jat

    Eggnog French Toast

    Eggnog French Toast I think I read about this in a Gourmet Magazine. It is rich and I must make it once a year. Use your favorite french toast bread. I prefer bigger slices. I also like the bread to be one day old, slightly on the drier side. I made this by longer soaking and a quick soak. I prefer the quick soak in the eggnog. Simply purchase your favorite eggnog store brand. I go with the most fat content always. Slice and dip your bread in the eggnog mixture. Heat a pan with a light layer of oil, and slightly brown both sides. I love the way it carmelizes. Keywords: Easy, Breakfast ( RG796 )
  18. One day after the cease fire and a month long invasion of Lebanon, an old lady stood in front of the rubble of her family's home in the south of Lebanon and declared, " We will, be able to knead and bake our own bread". Here is to her and hers. My wife let this dough rise overnight. Early in the morning I heat the Saaj and my wife cleans it with water. Our neighbours from one side (my brother Sam and his wife Fadia) join in to help. Our neighbours from the other side (my brother Dani and his wife Claude) bring Arabic coffee. The AB looking guy is Sam. The pillow is called 'kara'. Used to stretch the dough to half the thickness of a Tortilla and delivery onto the Saaj.. Viviana and Fadia work feverishly. The bread cooks in about one minute. They get help. Brother Dani and his son Nader. Some Baabeel Manaeesh. Home made Labneh and cheese. Olives, oil, zaatar from Lebanon and homegrown veggies.
  19. cook-em-all

    Breakfast in NDG

    I have lived in NDG for many years and I feel you can't get a decent breakfast/brunch. Just came back from a disatrous breakfast. It was the third time I have been there and sadly my last. Any suggestions?
  20. I know there have been some brunch discussions here before but I need a place for this Sunday that can accomodate 9 people with relative ease, with a young baby. Yikes. Everybody here came through big time when this Montrealer was in need of Philadelphia restaurant advice ... now I need a great brunch place! There are too many for me to choose from ... El Vez, Standard Tap (would prefer not, because I want to eat dinner there Sunday night), Carman's Country Kitchen (looks small), La Croix (looks expensive), Jones, Rx ... what do you all think?
  21. presto

    potluck BRUNCH suggestions?

    Greetings, all! I have a brunch to attend next Sunday, it's potluck, my fellow attendees are food appreciative, if not "gourmets" - I'd like to bring something different that won't scare off the "meat and potatoes" crowd, to serve about 10 adults. It needs to be something that travels well and can sit in my car during church (it's about 20 below zero Celcius here these days...no worries about it not staying cold!) This may be a witless question in this forum, but forgive me...I'm a newbie here at egullet, and occasionally feel I'm in over my head! glad to be here, though...and curious to see what folks can suggest!
  22. Fugu

    Brunch

    One of my apprentices, way back 18 years ago, now an exceutive chef, called me and we got to talking about among other things, buffet brunches served at her hotel. Does any of you still serve buffet brunch at your establishment? What is the current trend, if there is such a thing? Are the classical wellingtons and coulibiacs still being served? Any suggestions on how to make an exciting, cost effective buffet brunch that's uptodate with the younger crowd?
  23. After bemoaning the plethora of mediocre restaurants in Charlotte, I decided it was time for me to highlight one of our city's greatest: The Coffee Cup. I have lived in Charlotte for 12 years and have tried many breakfast establishments. To me, a good breakfast is a place where you can get good bisuits, good grits (I like mine on the firm side -- not runny), excellent bacon/country ham/sausage and hash browns or homefries. We have tried John's Country Kitchen on Central, Andersons, Athens, The Landmark, Eddie's Place and countless others. We mourned the demise of the Cupboard on South, which had really good biscuits and country ham, not to mention a deadly coconut pie. My husband almost cried when Rogers Barbecue closed - meaning the end of their deadly breafast "casserole" of scarmbled eggs topped with onions, bell peppers, potatoes, cheese and sausage gravy. We have missed the country ham and red eye gravy at Nashville's Loveless Motel since we left that city in 1991. We have been to the Coffee Cup before. After yesterday's breakfast, my family decided it was the ONLY place worth going to in Charlotte for a traditional country breakfast. They make real biscuits that don't have flecks of the yellow butter-flavored Crisco used by so many restaurants. You can order chicken and waffles, salmon patties, steak - even fried chicken with the fixin's for breakfast. I devoured my bacon - which was really more like fried side meat - fatty, crispy, melt-in-your mouth bits of salty bacon. Their smoked sausage and potatoes with bits of onion are excellent. Their sweet tea willl throw you into a diabetic coma if you're not careful. And the service - while a tad slow - is friendly and efficient. To all who visit - go here for breakfast. To all who live here - keep this place alive!
  24. I've been reading this topic on brunch over in Restaurant Life, and I keep wondering: what the hell is brunch, anyway? I surely don't have a good definition for it, and the bad definitions follow unpleasant paths (brunch is that which you have not yet sold by Sunday morning, e.g.). Googling "brunch" doesn't help, either. My favorite response is the first: Call me Amireaux and sign me up. What is this meal called brunch that you people eat?
  25. amccomb

    Holiday Brunch

    Every year, I make a big brunch on the morning after Thanksgiving and on Christmas morning. Normally, I make an egg dish some sort, potatoes of some sort, something sweet...sometimes a fruit salad or scones, and always biscuits and gravy. I prefer things I can make ahead, so I tend to do strata-type dishes for the egg dish and things like coffee cake, sweet potato cinnamon rolls, or bread pudding for the sweets. For the potatoes, I've done different hashes and potatoes roasted in duck fat (which I think I'll do ahead this year). Does anyone have any festive, delicious, impressive ideas that are easy to do or make ahead? What about drink ideas beyond coffee, cocoa, and OJ? We've done mimosas and bloody marys, too. Yum!
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