Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Bread'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Society Announcements
    • Announcements
    • Member News
    • Welcome Our New Members!
  • Society Support and Documentation Center
    • Member Agreement
    • Society Policies, Guidelines & Documents
  • The Kitchen
    • Beverages & Libations
    • Cookbooks & References
    • Cooking
    • Kitchen Consumer
    • Culinary Classifieds
    • Pastry & Baking
    • Ready to Eat
    • RecipeGullet
  • Culinary Culture
    • Food Media & Arts
    • Food Traditions & Culture
    • Restaurant Life
  • Regional Cuisine
    • United States
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • India, China, Japan, & Asia/Pacific
    • Middle East & Africa
    • Latin America
  • The Fridge
    • Q&A Fridge
    • Society Features
    • eG Spotlight Fridge

Product Groups

  • Donation Levels
  • Feature Add-Ons

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


LinkedIn Profile


Location

Found 679 results

  1. Yesterday at Jungle Jim's International Market in Fairfield, OH, I found a closeout on bottles of Hiram Walker's Gingerbread and Pumpkin Spice liqueurs at $5.99 each. Too good to pass up so I bought a bottle of each. Now, what to do with them? Aside from sipping straight, anyone got some recipe suggestions?
  2. doughgirl

    Salt in Bread Recipe?

    I've been wanting to make these lovely little buns and was wondering why none of the recipes I find include salt? I thought all bread needed salt or it would taste like fluffy cardboard? Would it be ok to add some salt to either of these recipes (most likely the first one), or would that mess it up? How much should I add? Recipe 1 Recipe 2 Thank you for your help!
  3. Fat Guy

    Slicing bread

    Do you slice it thick, thin, on the bias, never? I'm starting to realize that there's a lot of variation here.
  4. mamster

    Making good bread

    It wasn't the first time I'd made bread, but it was the first time I'd made good bread. Recently I was asked to test a recipe for an upcoming book, for a Flute Gana-type loaf, with a poolish starter and some cornmeal in the dough. I followed the recipe, formed the loaves, baked on a stone, and out came the same disappointing bread I've always made: looked fine, perfectly edible, but bland. I was about to conclude that all the books claiming you could get good rustic bread out of a home oven were bogus. But I was determined to give it another shot, so I turned to The Bread Baker's Apprentice. It has a Pain a l'Ancienne recipe that promises great results. It seemed too simple to work at all: it's a straight dough, with no starter or sponge (this is very uncommon in modern bread books), and after retarding overnight, you shape the loaves and pop them in the oven without even proofing. It's an extremely wet dough, and the best I could do was shape it into some flattish baguettes. The recipe does call for generating as much steam in the oven as possible, which I did by pouring hot water into a heated cast iron skillet and also using a spray bottle. About 22 minutes later, out came some gorgeously brown, if misshapen, loaves. Somehow I forced myself to let them cool completely before diving in. I couldn't even believe what I was eating at first. Was Laurie playing a trick on me, substituting some bread from Dahlia or Grand Central? No, this was my ugly bread. The crust to crumb ration was a little high, but that's the worst thing you could possibly say about this loaf. The crust was crisp, and loaded with flavor, and I got great gelatinization through the crumb, leaving it moist with irregular holes. If you're chary of homemade bread, like I was, try this recipe. You could mix up the dough tonight and pop it in the fridge, then bake the bread tomorrow morning. Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm off to buy a pound of yeast.
  5. Thank you, indeed, for this Q&A - if it weren't for American Pie, I wouldn't have convinced my Illinois-native sweetheart that there is life after Deep Dish, although I nearly caught a plane back to CT for New Haven pizza.... but here's my question. We, as a species, have gone from unleavened, to leavened, to sliced, with a recent dip into low-carb, yet it is all still variations on flour, salt and water. If you had to imagine what will happen to bread in the next hundred years, where do you think our bread is headed next? And, as an offshoot of that, where is your bread headed next? Now that you've explored crust, crumb and toppings, are you ready for something different or is the mystique still alive?
  6. Susan in FL

    Key Lime Dessert Bread

    Key Lime Dessert Bread 2/3 c unsalted butter, room temperature 2 c granulated sugar 4 eggs, slightly beaten 3 T Key lime juice Zest of 3 Key limes 1 tsp vanilla extract 3 c all-purpose flour 2-1/2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp salt 1 c whole milk Glaze 3 T Key lime juice 2/3 c granulated sugar Prepare two loaf pans by greasing well with butter or oil. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cream butter and sugar. Add in the eggs and beat together well. Pour in the Key lime juice, zest, and vanilla extract and combine well. Set aside. In a separate bowl combine the flour, baking powder, and salt. Add a little of the milk into the dry mixture, then add a little of the creamed butter and egg mixture, and then alternate the additions until all combined into a batter. Divide into the two loaf pans and bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until cakes are firm and nicely browned. Mix together the 3 tablespoons Key lime juice and the sugar. Spoon mixture over the baked breads. Cool for 15 minutes, then remove from loaf pans. Wrap, and store for about 24 hours. Slice, and serve. Keywords: Dessert, Easy, Breakfast, Brunch, Snack, Bread, Cake ( RG1339 )
  7. Hi All, I'll be in SF in late August. I'm looking for the best cheesemongers, the best bakeries, with excellent sourdough and any other specialties, and places with the best selections of Belgian or Belgian-style beers. I have had luck searching out quite a few restaurants in the eGullet threads in this forum, but I haven't yet found the above three items. Any help would be appreciated. Best, Alan
  8. Marzipan filled brioche bread pudding Read all directions first. This recipe takes 2 days to do it correctly This is a recipe recreated from a note in one of my great grandmother's journals made while she was travelling in France in the 1860s. There was no recipe, just a description of the dessert and her suppositions as to how it may have been made and what the ingredients might have been. Easy Brioche Rolls Must start preparation the day before serving this dessert. 1/2 cup milk 1/2 cup butter or margarine 1/3 cup sugar 1 tsp. salt 1 pkg. dry yeast 1/4 cup lukewarm water 1 egg, separated 3 whole eggs, beaten 3 1/4 cup flour *10 ounces marzipan* (Will be used later) Scald milk and while hot add butter (margarine), sugar, and salt. COOL TO LUKEWARM. Soften yeast in the water. Add to LUKEWARM milk mixture. Add egg yolk and beaten eggs and stir. Add flour and beat with wooden spoon for 2 minutes. Cover and let rise in a warm place (80-85 degrees) until more than double in bulk, about 2 hours or less. Stir down and beat (stir) thoroughly. Cover tightly with foil and refrigerate overnight. Remove from fridge and allow to come to room temp. Take plain brioche dough and form into small buns (golf ball size works nicely), cover and let them rest for 10 minutes. Filling You can use store bought marzipan or make your own. Make a rope of marzipan about the size of a tootsie roll and cut into pieces about the same width. (You don't have to shape them.) Put one of the marzipan pieces on each bun, draw the dough up around it and pinch and twist to seal. Place in a buttered pan with seam side down. Cover and allow to rise about 30 minutes or until nearly doubled in size. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Brush tops of rolls with melted butter. Place pan in center of oven. Bake till nicely browned. Remove from oven and place on a wire grid. When cool cover loosely with a cloth and let them set out several hours. We want them to be just a little stale. The next step which takes this into an entire new category Egg custard 4 eggs + 2 egg yolks, beaten till creamy 1 1/2 cups milk 1/2 cup cream 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup sugar 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg 1/4 cup sweet sherry (optional) Mix all these ingredients and beat until completely blended Preheat oven to 325 degrees Place the marzipan filled buns in a buttered baking dish sides touching. Pour the custard in and around the buns but do not cover the tops of the buns. Let this stand for a few minutes then add more of the custard mix as the rolls will have soaked up some. Add a little to begin with and allow the base of the buns to soak up some of the custard mixture so they will not float as the rest is added. Place the pan in a bain marie and bake until the custard is set. (Time varies with the size of the baking dish and the amount of custard) For a 9 x 11 pan it should be done in about 25 minutes. Test with a thin knife blade BETWEEN THE ROLLS at about 20 minutes, then at 25 minutes. Test every 2 minutes after that until blade comes out clean. ( RG1220 )
  9. Alinka

    Irish Soda Bread

    Irish Soda Bread I got this recipe from a friend. After making a few modifications, I like to bake it to eat for breakfast. 2-2.5 cups unbleached flour 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/8 cup sugar (if desired) 1/8 cup butter (ab. 1 oz) 1 egg 1 cup buttermilk Mix the dry ingredients and place them in food processor. Add butter and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse cornmeal. This can also be done by hand, using a knife or a pastry blender. Place the mixture in a bowl. In a separate bowl, mix the egg and buttermilk, then add the liquid mixture to the dry ingredients. Mix and place the dough on a surface dusted with flour. Knead the dough until smooth. Flatten into a disc about 1.5 inches thick, dust with flour, and cut a cross on top with a sharp knife (do not cut all the way through). Bake on a greased sheet for about 40 minutes at 375 F, or until nicely browned. Cool on a rack. This is the recipe I got. And here are my modifications: 1. I shape the dough into 2 loaves: one with caraway seed, and the other one with added Splenda and dry cranberries. 2. For the flour, I use 1/2 cup unbleached flour, 1/2 cup soy flour, and the rest is whole wheat. 3. I don’t usually keep buttermilk at home, but I always have kefir, so I substitute the buttermilk with 3/4 cup kefir + 1/4 cups water (because kefir is thicker). Keywords: Breakfast, Brunch, Bread ( RG1387 )
  10. I have a plain-vanilla bread machine on the way from Amazon. I'm unable to bake free-form or in pans in the oven at the moment. I’ve done both successfully in the past. I had a bread machine a long time ago after seeing Julia Child demo them with Jane Brody on her PBS series 'Baking with Julia.' I enjoyed using them for some time, then was able to move on to oven baking both in loaf pans and free form sourdough. Im interested in making just toast and sandwich bread at the moment. I’ve studied the older threads and have gotten some great tips, including the one from andiesenji about removing the blade prior to the last rise and bake. Brilliant! I wish that had occurred to me years ago. Im hoping to use the machine by weighing the ingredients as is the current practice by 'seasoned' bakers. I hope to find recipes that measure 'by weight.' My library has a large number of bread machine books, but these come from the era before most bakers at home had decent digital scales. I did find this ref: http://www.erikthered.com/flwm.html This may be all I need. Does anyone have worthwhile ‘tips?‘ Any further references to more current web sites that measure by weight? Has anyone successfully retarded dough in the refrigerator and then used the machine another day for baking? Ive gotten my yeast from King Arthur, and will use their flour available at Trader Joe’s. Eventually, I may be able to use the machine for the mixing and then bake in the oven. Thank you
  11. After ordering and receiving a brotform, I've decided to buy some cane and make my own. I also am going to make some linen lined baskets as bread rising baskets. Now I found an idea for a homemade cloche made from a terracotta flower pot, tray, eyebolt, nuts, and some washers. If my bread made in it doesn't suit me I can plant some herbs. http://home.att.net/~carlsfriends/carlospi...tisanalLoaf.htm I've built dozens of kilns for ceramics - now to convince myself to build a woodfired oven on my patio.
  12. Does anyone have any experience procuring sweetbreads in the Orange County area? I'm willing to travel a distance if it's worth it, so LA and San Diego counties are both options. I've also been trying to source other cuts like pork belly, veal/beef cheeks and offal. I've gone to some Asian markets like 99 Ranch and I wasn't thrilled with the visible quality, but I might need to check back if anyone has had other experiences with their meats. 99 Ranch had pork belly, but it was precut into thin slices. I've also checked with Whole Foods and they said they can get me Lamb Sweetbreads from New Zealand, but that it would take about 6 weeks. Any help would be appreciated!
  13. French Bread Dough (for bread machines) The dough is made in the bread machine, then taken out, shaped and baked in the oven. 10 oz water 1 T butter 3-1/2 c all purpose or bread flour 1-1/2 tsp sugar 1-1/4 tsp salt 1-1/2 tsp active dry yeast or bread machine fast rise yeast Add water and butter to pan. Add the flour, sugar, and salt. Tap pan to settle the ingredients then level them, pushing some of the mixture into the corners of the pan. Make a shallow well in the centre of the mixture, add the yeast. Lock the pan into the breadmaker. Select the dough setting. When cycle ends, place dough on floured surface and let rest for 15 minues. Roll dough into a 15x12 inch rectangle. Roll up tightly from long sidge, seal and taper ends. Place seam side down on a greased baking sheet, sprinkled with cornmeal. Cover and let rise for 45-55 minutes or until doubled in size. With a sharp knife, make 3 or 4 diagonal cuts on top of loaf. Combine 1 egg white and 1 tsp water and brush the top of the loaf with it. Bake in a 350 oven for 40 minutes or until golden brown. Keywords: Side, Bread Machine ( RG783 )
  14. sugarseattle

    pay rate for bread baker

    I'm getting ready to open a retail bakery and I've realized I can't quite make the baguette of my dreams. My bakery will specialize in desserts and breakfast pastries, but we will also offer pre-made sandwiches and salads. Breads are not going to be our mainstay, but we'd like to at least produce them ourselves. I can probably get the hang of it sooner or later, I'd just feel more comfortable with somebody with a little more experience. Ideally, I would like to hire someone proficient in making artisan breads, croissants, and brioche. My question is how much would they expect to earn? Also, since we will be very small at first, this person will also likely help with various prep items and such, just to flesh out their hours. I'm located in Seattle, WA. If you'd like to be confidential about your answer, please feel free to PM me and I will keep your answer in strict confidence for my reference only. Thanks.
  15. And from bread itself comes bread sauce. Bread sauce is a quiet nonchalant sort of thing, generally most self-deprecating the year round as it awaits its seasonal turn to appear with an arrogant burst of self-confidence as it brims from fine china gravy tureens at holiday time. Yet bread sauce holds in memory a long past, with paths meandering far and wide into other manners and means, perhaps related, perhaps simply co-existing. Yet each relation or close ally is made from the base form of bread, dashed into crumbs then set to gay dalliance with other good and warming things. Bread sauce was known in Ancient Rome, and from there it travels on forward through time, taking different forms of style. In this essay on a 1545 Remove for a Dinner Party we find that the breadsauce has become green with herbs, similar to what we now might call salsa verde. A hop skip and a jump brings us to the equitable joys of skordalia from Greece; gazpacho (which of course is a soup, but still we might include it for the familiarity of the humble stale bread crumb base, blended with liquids to make a fine dish); and ajo blanco, which is called the "original" gazpacho, showing a Moorish influence. During the Civil War in the US, roast partridge with breadsauce must have been a treat, the hunters carrying home braces of partridge to roast over the coals of the fireplace or stove, the stale bread generously endowed with flavor and spice to enrichen and blend together the strong flavors of the game and the creamy sauce. Fanny Farmer offers a recipe for bread sauce in her 1918 classic Boston Cooking School Cookbook, and our interest and curiosity in finding ways to use bread as sauce today is shown in a rustic, delightfully mouth-watering sauce povera for pasta from Italy - little cubed bread sauce and in a lovely minted bread sauce from the Naked Chef, Jamie Oliver. The classic bread sauce served today at many Christmas dinner-tables is soft, filled with scent of nutmeg and a gentle waft of onion, as in this traditional bread sauce. Indeed, we might need to call this recipe (as Henry James would have it) - "the time honored bread sauce of the happy ending" - though surely more shapes and surprises have yet to come. .......................................................................................................................................... Edited to sweep up crumbs of loosened grammar.
  16. Interior: Soft, rolled like a baguette, slightly sweet bread....it was white inside so i don't think it had eggs....maybe milk , maybe potatoes to enrichened Exterior: No crust what so ever. I was thinking portuguese bread but not sure..... Thanks
  17. Am considering trying sourdough bread and was going to send off to King Arthur's for some of their starter. Will I be able to freeze backup starter or do I have to keep it going actively or at least reefrigerated?
  18. jackal10

    Easter breads and cakes

    The time of year reminded me that I should make Simnel Cake, but I'm sure there are many other local traditions. UK: Simnel Cake: A light fruit cake with a marzipan core, and traditionally 12 toasted marizipan balls on top (the Apostles), and perhaps glace apricots... Originally for Mothering Sunday, but now often served at Easter. The tradition is that servant maids were allowed to make them at the Big House, and then take them home for Easter. Hot Cross Buns Spiced fruit buns with a slip cross on top Saffron breads. A quick Google reveals many more - breads with eggs in them, cheezy breads, tortes with spring greens, greek Tsourekia, Bulgarian kozunak Italian Columba and Pane Pasquali, Rusiian Paska, and others from Poland and Portugal.It would be better to hear from those with personal knowledge. Speak to me of Easter baking traditions:
  19. Bread Pudding cabin style by Debra Diller This recipe I made for a crowd for our dinner night at the yearly family reunion. Makes 4 Lasagna aluminum pans (can buy at any grocery store) or can be made in two full length hotel pans or whatever vessel you choose. Variations I usually make are rum raisin (use spiced bacardi rum) and chocolate. Caramel apple, any other booze and your own creation are also easily acceptable. Oven needs to be set at around 325-350 F depending on your altitude. Timing on this varies on how dry your bread is but is around an hour. I usually press on the top and it is done when no actual liquid oozes. Very technical I know... 2 qt 2% or Whole Milk 2 qt Heavy Cream 3 T Cinnamon 1 Vanilla Bean scraped 24 (lg) eggs 6 Loaves of Brioche or other bread 28 oz sugar Preheat oven to 350 F. Put pan in bottom of oven with water. Often all I have available to use at the cabins is a broiler pan. Fill pan 3/4 full with Hot water and put in bottom of oven. Combine all ingredients in pitcher or large bowl except bread. Use an immersion blender to combine. Use 2T vanilla if you do not have a bean, otherwise use the bean seeds and save pod for other recipes (you can put in spice grinder to use as "vanilla bean"). Set mixture aside. Cut up bread or bread items (pound cake, sourdough, pull apart bread works well) into about 1 inch cubes. Divide bread into 4 pans to "measure". Have a bowl aside to toss bread with desired ingredient. When you take the bread out of the pans to toss, spray these pans with Pam or equivilent spray. Also can use butter if available. If using chocolate (I use about 3 pounds chocolate for two pans) melt chocolate first. Toss bread with ingredients of choice and press in pans. Pour liquid ingredients over pans and do not cover the top or fill liquid to top of bread. This gives a crunch for texture. Bake until when you press on the mixture that no liquid comes out about 45 min to an hour usually, depending on the altitude you are baking at. Rotate pans at least once during baking to make sure it is even. Serve warm with ice cream or creme anglaise Keywords: Pudding, Dessert, Easy, Immersion Blender ( RG1161 )
  20. Sorry for the awkward title. Couldn't figure out how to word it concisely. Here's my dilemma. I have worked hard, studied hard, and have finally after many travails been able to consistently produce a good loaf of sandwich/pan bread. The problem is, unlike storebought or even bakery bread, my bread is not very durable for lack of a better word and falls apart when used for sandwiches. Wah. I have used both all-purpose and bread flour with no discernable difference. Any suggestions? Thanks.
  21. My girlfriend just sent me this recipe.. It looks outrageous.. Honestly Paula Dean is by far the sickest person I have seen... I could see Emeril telling her to calm down a bit and maybe not use so much fat and fried foods.. Has anyone tried this or used Krispy Kremes in a recipe before.. It looks very healthy.. Here is the link.. Krispy Kreme
  22. I've been getting my bread for my chemistry experiments in the city but I'm out and need some today. If anyone's awake, where can I get thick white bread and 7 grain and baguettes or ciabatto rolls? It doesn't have to be great, but lend itself well to cooking in a panini press.
  23. I bought a loaf at the Dahlia Bakery yesterday -tiny, expensive and delicious. I really love their house loaf - you can really taste the wheatiness of the flour, but $3 for what is basically a large roll is ridiculous. I like Le Fournil's baguettes, but they don't blow me away. Amazing value for money though. The La Brea bread you get around town isn't bad, I suppose, but it also doesn't knock my socks off. So whose bread do you like best ? - S
  24. GlorifiedRice

    Fairy Bread

    I recently was made aware of something called Fairy Bread. Basically its bread with butter and sprinkled with Jimmies or Sprinkles. Usually its the hard round sprinkles. But I adore it with the soft long jimmies. Its kids Birthday Party fare in Oz. Why isnt Fairy Bread in the USA? Its unfathomable why the Soccer Moms in the USA havent taken Fairy Bread and expanded upon it and opened Fairy Bread shops, with special breads and Jimmies etc... Its absolutely gorgeous on a plate, piled high... Look: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Fairy_Bread.jpg Come on people lets bring Fairy Bread to the states!
  25. Post your questions here -->> Q&A A Sampling of North Indian Breads Authors: Monica Bhide and Chef Sudhir Seth Introduction These breads are the taste of home for me -- wholesome breads prepared with simple ingredients and simple cooking methods. There are many different types of breads in North India. They can be prepared in the tandoor (clay oven, as is done in many restaurants), dry roasted, cooked on a griddle, or deep-fried. They can be prepared plain, or stuffed with savory or sweet filling, or just topped with mouthwatering garnishes. In the recipes below we are merely attempting to scratch the surface, presenting you with a glimpse of these magnificent breads. North Indian breads are prepared with various kinds of flours. The ones listed here use a whole-wheat flour known as atta and all-purpose flour. The dough is prepared in most cases without the use of yeast. (We have shown a special sweet bread here, called Sheermal, that is prepared using yeast.) Also, the tandoori breads are generally rolled out by hand not with a rolling pin. But in the recipes below, for ease of use for the home cook, we have used a rolling pin. As you will also see then, no special equipment is needed. We have prepared the breads in a traditional oven and in a non-stick skillet. (We have included some pictures towards the end of the lesson of a roti being prepared in a commercial tandoor.) A few tips: • Knead the dough well, adding only enough water or other specified liquid to make the dough the right consistency. • A must for preparing these breads is to let the dough rest as indicated. This will ensure that the dough softens and moistens, making it more pliable and easier to stretch • To prepare simple ghee (clarified butter) see below but for a in-depth discussion check out this wonderful thread in the India forum. (See the last few suggestions on preparing it by melting butter.) • You can also purchase ghee or clarified butter at your local Indian grocer or from www. Namaste.com. Clarified Butter (Ghee) Yields: About ½ cup ½ lb unsalted butter Heat a heavy pan over low heat. Add the butter, allowing it to melt. Once the butter has melted, increase the heat, bringing the butter to a simmer. The butter will start to foam. Reduce the heat and simmer for about 15 minutes. Watch carefully as it may burn. The milk solids will start to settle at the bottom, and the liquid butter will float to the surface. When the liquid butter becomes amber in color, remove it from from the heat. Cool to room temperature. Strain the amber liquid into a jar and discard the milk solids. Cover and store, refrigerated, for up to 6 months. Plain Naan Dough Naans are traditional Indian breads prepared in clay ovens or tandoors. They are commonplace on most Indian menus. We have tried here to present a simple dough for Naans and then two of the more unusual preparations for it: the Peshawari Naan and the Onion Kulcha. . • ½ cup milk • 1 teaspoon sugar • 1 cup warm water • 1 tablespoon yogurt • 1 egg • 4 cups of all-purpose flour (labelled "maida" in Indian grocery store) • 1 teaspoon salt • 1 teaspoon baking powder • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil (for baking tray) • 2 tablespoons clarified butter or ghee In a bowl whisk together the milk, sugar, water, yogurt and egg. Place the flour, salt and baking powder in a large shallow bowl. Mix well. Pour the liquid onto the flour and begin to knead. Continue kneading until you have a soft dough. If you need more liquid, add a few tablespoons of warm water. Knead for at least 10 minutes, or until you have a soft dough that is not sticky. Oil the dough. Cover the dough with a damp cloth and place in a warm place for 1½ - 2 hours, or until the dough has doubled in volume. Directions for plain naan: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease a large, heavy baking tray and set aside. Lightly dust the rolling surface and rolling pin with flour. Knead the dough again on the floured surface for about 5 minutes. Divide it into 8 equal pieces and cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap. Roll each piece into a ball and flatten it with your hands. Using a rolling pin, roll it out into an oval shape (about 8 inches). Using your hands, pull at both ends of the oval to stretch it a little. Continue until you have made 8 naans. Brush each oval with clarified butter. Place the naans on the baking sheet bake for 5 minutes. Turn on the broiler and broil for an additional 3 minutes or until golden brown. Peshawari Naan In this delightfully sinful recipe, the naan dough is stuffed with dried nuts and raisins and baked. Serve this warm right out of the oven for the best taste. 1 recipe prepared plain naan dough For the stuffing: • 1 tablespoon cashews (crushed) • 1 tablespoon almonds (crushed) • 1+1 tablespoons pistachios (crushed) • 1 tablespoon raisins • 1 teaspoon cilantro leaves, minced • 1 teaspoon sugar • 1 tablespoon Milk Mawa Powder (Dried whole milk powder) • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds, ground • 3 tablespoons melted butter or clarified butter Prepare the Naan dough. While the dough is resting, prepare the filling. Set aside 1 tablespoon of pistachios and the raisins. In a mixing bowl combine all the other filling ingredients. Add a few tablespoons of water to bind them together to form a lumpy consistency. Roll the dough into a log. Cut into 8 equal portions. Lightly dust the rolling surface with flour. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease a large, heavy baking tray and set aside. Lightly oil or flour your hands. Take one portion of the dough and roll into a ball between the palms of your hands. Flatten the ball. Place it on the floured surface. Use a rolling pin to roll it out into a circle about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Add a tablespoon of the filling to the center. Bring the sides together and pinch them to seal and form a ball. Flatten lightly. Dust very lightly with flour. Roll the flattened ball again on a lightly floured surface until about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Garnish with the reserved pistachios and raisins. Continue until you have made 8 naans. Brush each naan with clarified butter. Place the naans on the baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes. Turn on the broiler and broil for an additional 3 minutes or until golden brown. Serve hot. Onion Kulcha We present this recipe by popular demand. Here the naan is stuffed with a spiced onion mix and baked to perfection. 1 recipe prepared plain naan dough For the stuffing: • 2 small red onions, finely chopped • 1 tablespoon minced cilantro • 1 tablespoon Chaat Masala (www.namaste.com) • 1 teaspoon red chili powder • Salt to taste • 3 tablespoons melted butter or clarified butter • 2 teaspoons cilantro, minced for garnish • small boiled potato, grated (optional) Prepare the naan dough. While the dough is resting, prepare the filling. First, using the palms of your hands, squeeze out all the water from the chopped onions. If the onions still appear to be watery, add a small boiled grated potato to your filling. This will prevent the filling from spilling out of the kulcha. In a mixing bowl combine all the filling to form a lumpy consistency. Roll the dough into a log. Cut into 8 equal portions. Lightly dust the rolling surface with flour. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease a large, heavy baking tray and set aside. Lightly oil or flour your hands. Take one portion of the dough and roll into a ball between the palms of your hands. Flatten the ball. Place it on the floured surface. Use a rolling pin to roll it out into a circle about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Add a tablespoon of the filling to the center. Bring the sides together and pinch them to seal and form a ball. Flatten lightly. Dust very lightly with flour. Roll the flattened ball again on a lightly floured surface until about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Dip your fingers in water and moisten the surface of the kulcha very lightly. Sprinkle with a few minced cilantro leaves. Continue until you have made 8 kulchas. Place the kulchas on the baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes. Turn on the broiler and broil for an additional 3 minutes or until golden brown. Serve hot. Ande Ka Paratha This is a unique addition to your recipe collection. A mild and flaky bread, it is a small kid’s favorite at our home. Makes 8 parathas • 2 cups Indian atta flour (whole-wheat flour) • 1½ teaspoons table salt • 2+2 tablespoons melted butter or clarified butter • Water as needed • 8 eggs In a bowl combine the flour, salt and two tablespoons of clarified butter. Slowly begin to add the water, kneading the flour as you go. Make a dough, kneading for at least 10 minutes. The final dough should be soft and pliable. It should not be sticky or else it will not roll out well. Cover the dough with a damp cloth or plastic wrap and let it sit for 30 minutes. Roll the dough into a log. Cut into 8 equal portions. Lightly dust the rolling surface with flour. Lightly oil or flour your hands. Take one portion and roll into a ball between the palms of your hands. Flatten the ball. Place it on the prepared floured surface. Use a rolling pin to roll it out into a circle about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Now fold the dough over itself. Take the folded dough and roll it around itself into a spiral. Tuck the end under. Do this for all eight dough balls. (This folding and rolling will make the paratha very flaky.) Now flatten the spiral and roll again on a lightly floured surface until about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Heat a griddle on medium heat. Brush it lightly with butter and add the paratha. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until the bottom of the paratha begins to blister. Brush the top lightly with butter and remove from heat. Put the paratha aside on a warm plate. Grease the same griddle a bit and break an egg on it. Cook the egg sunny side up. Place the cooked side of the paratha on the egg. Press down gently to break the yolk. Let it cook for a minute. Brush the top of the paratha with butter, flip carefully and cook for another minute or two until the paratha is no longer raw. Remove the paratha from the griddle and place on a serving platter. Cover with a paper towel. Continue until all the parathas are cooked. Serve hot. Indian Bread Stuffed With Spicy Potatoes (Aloo Ka Paratha) This filled paratha is a very popular North Indian bread, served traditionally with homemade white butter and Indian pickles of your choice. • 2 cups Indian atta flour (whole-wheat flour) • 4 tablespoons semolina • 1½ teaspoons table salt • 2 tablespoons melted clarified butter or butter • Water as needed • 3 medium potatoes, peeled • 2 Serrano green chilies, seeded and finely minced • 1 tablespoon cilantro, minced • 1 1-inch piece fresh ginger root, grated • 1 teaspoon Chaat Masala • 4 tablespoons melted clarified butter or butter • A few tablespoons flour for dusting In a bowl combine the wheat flour, semolina flour, salt and two tablespoons of clarified butter. Slowly begin to add the water, kneading the flour as you go. Make a dough, kneading for at least 10 minutes. The final dough should be soft and pliable. It should not be sticky, or else it will not roll out well. Cover the dough with a damp cloth or plastic wrap and let it sit for 30 minutes. While the dough is resting, prepare the filling. Boil the potatoes in enough water to cover for about 15 minutes. Drain. Put the potatoes in a bowl and mash them well with a fork. Add the green chilies, cilantro, ginger root, and chaat masala and mix well. Set this filling aside to cool. Roll the dough into a log. Cut into 8 equal portions. Lightly dust the rolling surface with flour. Lightly oil or flour your hands. Take one portion and roll into a ball between the palms of your hands. Flatten the ball. Place it on the prepared floured surface. Use a rolling pin to roll it out into a circle about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Lightly brush the surface with the clarified butter. Add a tablespoon of the potato filling to the center. Bring the sides together and pinch them to seal and form a ball. Flatten lightly. Dust very lightly with flour. Roll the flattened ball again on a lightly floured surface until about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Heat a griddle on medium heat. Brush it lightly with butter and add the paratha. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until the bottom of the paratha begins to blister. Brush the top lightly with butter and flip over. Cook for 2 minutes. Remove the paratha from the griddle and place on a serving platter. Cover with a paper towel. Continue until all the parathas are cooked. Sheermal A sweet bread, it is one of the few Indian breads that uses yeast. Keep the dough in a warm place to ensure that it rises. You can increase the amount of sugar if you like a sweeter taste. • 1 packet dry yeast • 1 teaspoon sugar • ¼ cup water • 1½ cups all-purpose flour • ¼ teaspoon salt • 2 tablespoons sugar • 2 eggs (separate 1 egg and set the yolk aside) beat the whole egg and the white together • 2 tablespoons melted clarified butter or butter • Extra flour for dusting • Pitted cherries/raisins for garnish Mix yeast with the sugar and 1/4 cup water. Set aside until frothy, about 5 - 10 minutes. Combine the flour, salt and sugar. Add the clarified butter, egg and yeast mixture. Knead until a smooth dough is formed. (You may need more warm water.) Set aside to rise until the dough doubles in size. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease a large, heavy baking tray and set aside. Lightly dust the rolling surface and rolling pin with flour. Knead the dough again on the floured surface for about 5 minutes. Divide it into 6 equal pieces and cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap. Roll each piece into a ball and flatten it with your hands. Using a rolling pin, roll it out into a disc. Continue until you have made 6 discs. Beat the reserved egg yolk and brush a little on each sheermal. Place a few cherries on the sheermal for garnish. Place the discs on the baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes. Turn on the broiler and broil for an additional 3 minutes, or until golden brown. Tandoori Roti We wanted to show how the tandoor is used to prepare breads. These pictures are of a special roti or bread, called Tandoori Roti, being prepared in the hot tandoor or clay oven. The basic recipe entails preparing a dough of whole-wheat flour. (See the paratha dough prepared earlier.) The flattened rolled out discs are then cooked in the tandoor until the dark spots begin appearing on the surface of the bread. Post your questions here -->> Q&A
×