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Found 389 results

  1. KMPickard

    Yellow & White Teas

    We're just getting into the world of fine teas and enjoying our explorations tremendously. So far favourites (mine) are Koslanda Organic from the Uva area of Sri Lanka and Keemun Hao Ya "A". L leans towards Chinese Kwai Flower Oolong. We have some Darjeeling Whyte (sic) tea and I'm somewhat at a loss as to how to brew it. I've looked up several tea sites on the web and come up with brewing times of anywhere from 2-3 minutes to 7 minutes. chd also mentions in a post on another thread that the ideal way to brew white tea is to steep it overnight at room temp. So... I'm totally confused. Any suggestions for me? Thanks, Kathy
  2. On page 42 of the April 2004 issue of Food Arts magazine there's a photo of a really cool looking "layered espresso" created by some guy named Alan Miguel Kaplan. It's in a tall clear glass, and it appears that the drink has milk on the bottom, espresso in the middle, and foam on the top. All it says about how it's made is "By expertly and delicately adding the steamed milk with certain precision, we created the illusion of three different layers."
  3. jpr54_

    tea and 2005

    do you have any new year's resolutions on new teas to try in the coming year? i am going to explore the world of oolongs-to expand the more fermented and oxidized. i enjoy the more green, lightly fermented, low oxidized taiwan oolongs. i order from a variety of websites-my favorites are www.teahomeusa.com, www.enjoyingtea.com and www.jingteashop.com joanne
  4. viaChgo

    yerba mate

    Just tried yerba mate for the first time yesterday. I liked it. The flavor is not my favorite among teas but it was still enjoyable. Maybe I wasn't sure what to expect. And it had a nice, pleasant caffeine kick that was different from a coffee or black tea. Other than being from South America, I don't really know anything about yerba mate.
  5. jpr54_

    Tea and Coffee

    I drink both tea and coffee- I appreciate the separating tea and coffee out as a special group of its own- I will be traveling to Fort Lauderdale and would like suggestions/recommendations for tea! Joanne
  6. 12BottleBar

    Frost Tea -- Anyone tried?

    Has anyone else tried the frost teas produced by Los Angeles' Chado and James Norwood Pratt. They introduced them several years ago. Single estate leaves picked at the height of the frost, just like ice wine. Do any other producers make this kind of tea? Absolutely lovely stuff.
  7. Just wanted to spread the benefits... specialteas.com, an old favorite source of good teas, has a 75% off everything in their inventory. I hope this is a inventory refreshing operation rather than a last hurrah, but either way, there are (still) some great deals there now.
  8. f3xy

    The Little Tea Book

    I was reading a tea blog and I stumbled on someone who stumbled on this. It's a book from 1903 titled The Little Tea Book. It's a short read. A great deal of poetry. An interesting look at tea from an older perspective. Hope someone enjoys it!
  9. "Msk" posed a good question in another thread and I believe it deserves some space of its own for discussion.... Wow. This is wide open and there are so many. Plenty more are sure to be forthcoming but here's what I look for and want to know.... ==================================================== What To Look For: 1) Is the portafilter being left in the grouphead of the espresso machine when it's not in use? The thermal mass of the brass portafilter asembly is crucial in retaining heat so the brewing temp does not drop off as the water is forced through the grounds. If you walk into a cafe and see the portafilters sitting on the counter separately from the machine, waiting to be filled and used... fuggedaboudit - chances of getting really good espresso are nil. 2) Do they make a practice of grinding large amounts and leaving the doser filled with already ground coffee? Not good. Grounds sitting in the doser will literally, within an hour or so, start getting flat and losing the potential for creating good crema and superior shots. If they grind to fill the doser every ten to fifteen minutes or so during the morning rush, it's fine but if you walk in at a slow time during mid afternoon or evening and they don't grind the coffee right then for your shot - chances are you just won't get a good shot. Some of the very best cafes use timer assemblies that grind the right amount of reach shot and the beans for every shot are ground when you order the drink - this is the best. 3) Does it appear that they're tamping and doing it well? Usually the mark of a place that cares enough to try for good results. In some places you may see a LaMarzocco Swift grinder - this is the one where the barista actually locks the portafilter onto the grinder and hits a button. In this case the barista does not tamp. The grinder automatically grinds the right amount and tamps. Some purists believe that hand tamping is the best but a Swift can actually do a better and more consistent job than all but the best baristas. A relatively inexperienced barista with a well maintained and tweaked espresso machine and a Swift can produce very good results indeed. 4) Is the steam wand nice and clean and does it get wiped down and purged after each pitcher of milk is steamed? If you see a milk crud encrusted steam wand it's safe to assume that, at the very least, they don't do a good job of steaming milk. More important - it speaks to the big picture. Lack of attention to a crucial process detail like this generally indicates that the owner/manager/staff either doesn't know or doesn't care enough about milk preparation to do it correctly and more likely than not.... that attitude extends to espresso preparation. 5) Is the barista continually adding milk to pitchers that have sat around for extended periods of time on the counter or re-steaming milk that has sat around for awhile? During a busy morning or evening rush it's a resonable practice to steam in the same pitcher for awhile and keep adding more cold milk but the use old milk/warm milk/re-steamed milk means the same thign as the previous comment - lack of attention to process control. What To Ask: 1) Do you roast your own beans, how often is this done and how fresh are the beans you use? They should not be using beans more than ten days past roasting date. 2) If you don't roast them yourselves, where do they come from? In some areas you may find cafes using five pound bags of the popular Italian bar blends like LaVazza. Beans like this can make very good espresso but they have to be coming from a trusted source that monitors dates and has good turnover. Good microroaster beans will still be better in nearly all cases. Other cafes will buy from reputable microroasters. I know of a place in Brooklyn that buys from Caffe Vivace in Seattle. One of Vancouver BC's better local cafes actually has their beans shipped in from Chicago IL in the US! (Intelligentsia Roasters) 3) How many ounces in your double shot? If they say 1.5 to 2 ounces and they really deliver this amount - chances are good that they're trying to do it right. Perhaps they won't be hitting it on every shot - nobody does - but it likely means they understand what's needed. ==================================================== These are only a few but in my experience if any of the above don't meet the right criteria.... chances are slim that you'll get really good espresso.
  10. Varietal: Mao Xie Oolong English Name: Hairy Crab Oolong Harvest: Fall, 2009 Growing Region: Anxi County, Fujian Roast: Heat dried, no roasting Vacuum Sealed into 50 gram portions eG Society member Greg Glancy at http://www.norbutea.com is contributing 7 gram vacuum packaged samples of a new Fall 2009 Mao Xie, also known as Harry Crab for this Tea Tasting & Discussion. Greg has provided four samples of 7 grams each, and I will mail three of them to the eG Society members participating in this Tasting and Discussion. This is the first of the last three Tea Tasting & Discussions for this year. However, several interesting Tea Tasting & Discussions in a new format are already slated for the first part of 2010. If you subscribe to the eG Coffee & Tea forum you will be among the first to know when one is posted. While the tasting is open to all members who have posted at least ten substantive posts in the eG Coffee and Tea forum, preference will be given until midnight (EDST) Monday, November 16th to those who have not participated in the last two tastings. Although many teas brew well both gongfu style aand Western style, Greg says this one really needs to be brewed gong fu style, so samples will go to those who will brew this tea gong fu (which means "with skill") style in a gaiwan or Yixing teapot. The three free samples are available to members who also 1) will do at least one gongfu style brewing session with multiple infusions from the sample, 2) will report on their experience and participate actively in the discussion, and 3) who have previously posted at least ten (10) substantive posts (questions, answers, comments that add to discussions) in the Coffee and Tea forum. As always, everyone who does not receive a sample is welcome and encouraged to participate in the discussion. So, please PM me now for details if you would like to receive one of the the free samples and participate in the tasting and discussion. Here's more information on this special Oolong tea from the Norbutea.com website. (Used with permission.) I have known Greg for several years since a presentation he once gave on a trip through the tea markets and farms of China fed my growing interest in learning more about fine teas. Since then Greg has become a tea friend and we drink tea together and trade teas and tea stories from time to time.
  11. jpr54_

    The Art of Tea

    I just received issue #2 of this beautifully prepared magazine- I purchased my copy at www.houdeasianart.com The magazine has articles on yixing teapots, puerh tea, gong fu style tea servic joanne r. aka jpr54_
  12. egalicontrarian

    Pleasant coffee and tea abominations

    Inspired by an exchange between Naftal and Hassouni in the winter tea thread, I thought I'd ask something different but possibly related: what coffee or tea mixtures do people make that they are either embarrassed to admit, or that they find delightfully disgusting or painful? This could be anything from plain old "I drink Folgers black every day!" to an exotic but grotesque mixed drink. I'll start: I'm about to drink my favorite disgusting infusion, Ku Ding, with a cheap bourbon whiskey, Fighting Cock. Interestingly, in my experience the aftertaste of Ku Ding easily outlasts - by a lot - hard liquor. My first experience in this genre was leaving several "nails" of Ku Ding in a bottle of Smirnoff for several days. The experience was roughly this: upon drinking, one is immediately hit with the familiar feeling of drinking Vodka, but then the extreme bitterness of the Ku Ding emerges and permeates the entire gustatory system. (Note: you may remember me from the "butter coffee" thread. Some posters reacted in horror to the idea, so I suppose that would count here as well!)
  13. pateluday

    Masala chai: a simple recipe

    Come Winter and Masala Chai (Spiced tea) becomes popular in India. Most of the masala chai available in packets are a mix of mind boggling spices. But I make mine very simple. Here is the recipe for tea enthusiasts: Ingredients: CTC tea leaf (Assam Black) Milk Sugar (To taste) Cardamom (2/3 Pods) Shreded Ginger Clove Powder (1/10 teaspoon) Jaggrey (1/4 Teaspoon) Method Bring water to boil Add leaves and simmer for two minutes Strain Add the rest of the ingredients and simmer for another two minutes. This hot beverage proves to be good during winters for some cheers. It is alo good for people suffering from bad throat.
  14. Richard Kilgore

    Seasoning Chinese Yixing Teapots

    I have read and been told about several methods for seasoning a Chinese Yixing teapot. All assume you are going to use only one type of tea for the pot. One suggests boiling it in a pot with used tea leaves of the type you plan to use in the pot, then letting it soak for a few hours. Another suggests steeping new tea leaves in it for three hours. A third method, told to me by a Chinese aquaintance, who says it is used by tea professionals in China, is to steep new leaves in it and then leave it in a cool spot for three days. I have tried a modification of these that worked okay, but not as well as I expect that the three day soak would producce. What method do you use? Any of these or something different?
  15. JAZ

    Milk/cream in coffee

    A while back, a co-worker offered to get me a cup of coffee and asked if I wanted milk or sugar. "A little milk," I replied. He brought me a cup that was pale tan in color and had to have been 40 percent half-and-half. To me, it was undrinkable -- lukewarm and unpleasantly mouth-coating; yet another co-worker who got a virtually identical cup proclaimed it "perfect." (I ended up pouring half the coffee out and refilling the cup with straight coffee, at which point it was almost okay.) Since then, I've been paying attention to milk in coffee, and I believe I'm in the minority. Most people who drink milk or cream in their coffee seem to like much more than I do. I also prefer whole milk; although half-and-half is acceptable, it's much easier to overpour. "Reduced fat" milk is okay if I'm desperate, but non-fat is worthless in coffee. (And forget non-dairy "creamer" -- I'd rather not drink coffee than use it.) What kind of milk do others prefer? How much? Steamed or cold?
  16. eGullet Society member Greg Glancy at norbutea.com is contributing free 10 gram samples of each of three interesting Japanese teas for this Tea Tasting & Discussion (TT&D). Sets of the samples will go to up to three eG members active in the forums: if you have at least 50 posts anywhere in the eG Forums in the past 12 months, or if you have at least 10 posts in the Coffee & Tea Forum, and are interested in receiving the free samples and participating in this TT&D, please read on (this post and the three following soon) and then PM me. The first Japanese tea is a Sunpu Boucha - 2010 1st Harvest Hon Yama Kuki-Hojicha. Text and image used with permission by norbutea.com. The next two posts will describe the second and third Japanese teas for this TT&D, and the fourth one one will provide additional important information on how to request the three free teas. Stay tuned!
  17. My friends and acquaintances know that they'll always get to try one of my ever changing espresso blend when they visit and I typically have some roasted coffee varietals (at least three or four) in the freezer for regular coffee. How about tea? I drink it only on occasion and keep a tin of Earl Grey and one of Irish Breakfast in the freezer (loose tea - I use a tea ball). Will one of you kindly souls with tea expertise suggest five or six varities that I might invest in? I'd like to have a coupl stalwart old reliable type selections for the unadventurous but also want to have a few that most of my friends have not tried - something a bit less commonplace that I might introduce them to.
  18. I've recently learned about a type of tea popular in certain parts of China, where oolong is stuffed into a hollowed-out pomelo and allowed to age. Might this have been the style of tea the Earl was trying to have replicated by his English tea blenders? During the time period when Earl Grey was developed, I believe that Europeans had yet to make a distinction between a heavy oxidized oolong and a black tea. Thoughts?
  19. I have been drinking a ti kwan yin for a while and started brewing it in a pot heated with hot water, etc, and then went to a large mug/cup also heated beforehand..and then transfering to my drinking cup.. .While rooting around in the kitchen I found a mug that was about 20 0z. It is a stainless steel"thermos" style thing. I found that I could pour the hot water over the TKY, in the mug, and let it brew for the alotted time with almost no temp change, and then put a mesh basket in the top of it and pour the resulting liquid into my drinking cup...The leaves stayed in the "thermos" thing and were re steeped as needed... This saved much time heating the pot or cup to maintain temps... Just thought I would mention this in case someone else had one of these "thermos type mugs around.... Bud
  20. Yajna Patni

    Confusing Tea Grades

    Any one else confused by all the grades of tea? My first question is... what is the difference between Orange Pekoe and CTC? The tea i am drinking now says it is orange pekoe, but it looks like the little balls i associate with CTC.
  21. Toliver

    Nestea Ice

    Nestea Ice It's a very...interesting...web site on the new product. I thought about posting this in the Soda Pop section but figured it should go here. There's supposed to be an ingredient in it that creates a cooling sensation in your mouth. Anyone see this product in their area?
  22. jpr54_

    Harney's

    This appeared on teamail this morning Harney & Sons will be opening up a tea room at 433 Broome St. this month, according to the Wall Street Journal: "The SoHo store will combine a country aesthetic with downtown chic, with rustic and modern design elements. In the 2,500-square-foot space there will be a tasting bar with tea consultants and a modern afternoon-tea service with light fare."
  23. Richard Kilgore

    Tea with food?

    I am curious. Do you drink teas with food? What type of tea do you like to drink with what foods? Any pairings that don't work well for you?
  24. LuckyGirl

    Organic Tea

    I am wondering about organic vs. non-organic tea. I would imagine that tea leaves absorb/hold pesticides and herbicides much in the same way that thin skinned fruits (like peaches) and berries do. I avoid conventionally grown produce and I am thinking that I would want to avoid non-organic teas too. I was looking for a tea for my daily drinking and ordered a few organic dragonwells to try but I also ordered many non-organic teas to try too. It seems that if I only limit myself to organic teas then I will be severely limiting myself but at the same time I don't know why I wouldn't apply the same criteria that I do for my produce to my tea. Thoughts?
  25. eG Society member Greg Glancy at Norbutea.com is contributing 10 gram samples of a new Taiwan Alishan High Mountain Oolong from the recent spring harvest 2009. Greg has provided four samples of 10 grams each, and I will mail three of them to the eG Society members participating in this tasting and discussion. While the tasting is open to all members who have posted at least ten substantive posts in the Coffee and Tea forum, preference will be given until midnight (EDST) Friday, July 31st to those who have not participated in the last two tastings. Preference will also be given to those who will brew this tea gong fu (with skill) style in a gaiwan. ("Substantive posts" simply means "contributed something to the discussions".) As always, everyone is welcome and encouraged to participate in the discussion. So, please PM me now for details if you would like to receive one of the the free samples and participate in the tasting and discussion. Here's more information on this special Oolong tea from the Norbutea.com website. I have known Greg for several years. A presentation he gave on a trip through the tea markets and farms of China fed my growing interest in learning more about fine teas. Since then Greg has become a tea friend and we drink tea together and trade teas and tea stories from time to time.
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