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  1. Recently I picked up a few different types of emulsifiers in bulk powder form when I saw them in passing at a catering wholesaler. Having never used powdered emulsifiers before in cooking or baking, I figured I'd find pretty comprehensive instructions for their use on the web - but I can't. I'm not a stranger to food science but nor am I a chemist. I understand that emulsifiers are at least sometimes prepared by pre-mixing them into a (heated?) liquid or fat and then using the resulting solution in the actual recipe, which may explain why a lot of commercial emulsifier mixtures are packages as tubes of gel or paste. I've also checked several industry-level textbooks about emulsifiers and while they are fantastic for in-depth explanations of the chemistry behind each emulsifier, they do not (as you might imagine) provide guidance on how a lowly baker or cook would actually use a powdered form. So does anyone know how to prepare and use a dry powdered form of any of the following in a real recipe? Specifically I am most interested in enhancing baked goods and adding stability to sauces, but would also like to know how to use them for other processes such as sausage-making too. E471 Mono- and diglycerides of fatty acids E481 Sodium stearoyl lactylate E482 Calcium stearoyl lactylate E472e DATEM (diacetyl tartaric acid ester of mono- and diglycerides) Thanks.
  2. I cooked two turkey breasts sous vide. This year had access to the Meater+ thermometer probe which I managed to vacuum seal in the bag without difficulty (it is small). Since it works wirelessly I was able to monitor and it records the internal temperatures at the thickest part of the breast. I thought the results were interesting. I cooked at 60C for 8 hours. I have always used https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/a-better-way-to-turkey-cook-that-bird-sous-vide-for-the-best-feast-ever which gives long cooking times at lower temperature. I have found that as according to this page https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2014/11/sous-vide-turkey-breast-crispy-skin-recipe-thanksgiving.html that 55C gives turkey which is just a little too pink for most tastes. Over the last few years have increased the temperature up to 59/60 and I find it perfect - very moist and tender, but pale not pink. See attached images. I changed my mind a couple of times and started at 58 then 60 then 59 again, so ignore the slight variations. The thing I found interesting was that the thickest part (of a large breast) reached 55C in around 1 hour 40 mins and target of 59 in 2 hours 30 mins. Now I appreciate that sous vide is a combination of temperature and time or duration, but the data make me think that around 4 hours would be sufficient, as per the seriouseats table. I have previously used the chefsteps 55-58 for their much longer advised times, up to 12 hours and the meat is still quite pink at the end, so I dont believe 55 for 12 hours would effectively be the same. From now on I will watching the internal temperatures with interest. This has always been the (relative) unkown for sous vide amateurs.
  3. I am looking at building a drying chamber for cured meats. It would have basic humidity and temperature control. I had a question about the environment inside the chamber as I am trying to figure out what controls I feel like building. Is there ever a time that the humidity would have to be raised? My assumption is that once the chamber is sealed, and a closed system is formed, thehumiditywould rise above the desired 70-90%RH, and it would only have to be controlled in a downward direction. Does anyone know if this is a correct assumption? It would save me having to build a water injection system. I will make sure to do a build log and code for anyone who is interested. Thank you, Joshua
  4. The folks from Nomiku have launched a kickstarter campaign for a new version of their circulator... https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/nomiku/new-nomiku-sous-vide-wifi-connected-and-made-in-th
  5. I think about this subject fairly often, but especially when I am thinking about converting a slow cooker recipe to sous vide. While I love the texture and juiciness I get with sous vide, I find that I often want a sauce. And I have quite a few slow cooker recipes that I know have good sauces, but the meat tends to be a little on the dry side. Thus my ideas about converting. I thought this might be a topic with legs if other folks are having the same questions. I'd like to make this recipe: Cranberry Pork Roast. I found a nice little pork loin roast (2.88 lb.) and have rubbed it with Penzey's Ozark seasoning and sucked it (family lingo for vacuum bagging). My thought is to sous vide it and make the sauce on the side and just serve it with/in/on top of the sauce. Advice? Thoughts? Warnings? Also, if you think that this is more of an IP thing tell me that, too. And, considering that the sauce is sweet, would you do it in steps in the IP? Thanks so much!
  6. I'm used to cooking pork butt sous vide, but I've just purchased a pork roast. Usually I cook at 140 F for three or four days. Should I change the time/temp for a regular pork roast?
  7. I was reminded the other day of the egg-in-plastic-wrap-poach method.
  8. I have been tasked with putting together a team for a new kosher barbecue event in Arizona, happening sometime later this year. The event was supposed to be in mid-April, but the venue decided to cancel. The organizers are busy looking for a new venue, and have assured us that this will happen. Many details for the event are not quite settled yet, so, I am trying to prepare for all sorts of contingencies beyond the usual concerns about putting out good food. What is known is that we will be following the KCBS kosher rules. As far as I can tell, there were 10-12 such events held last year across the US. So, it's a pretty small world. I don't think there's a kosher championship ladder like the other barbecue events have, either. I think it's a good time to get in, get practice and see where it takes me. Now, I've been reading and watching videos online with all sorts of info on smoking/cooking for competitions. I have watched some of the TV shows, and one documentary. It's been kind of a mixed bag in terms of usefulness. No one has posted much about kosher barbecue, so I am making changes to recipes and procedures and running a lot of tests. I currently have access to my home kitchen which is small but adequate, the stove is electric and unremarkable and about 7 years old. It does maintain temperature well, and can be set to run anywhere from 140°F to 550°F. I also have access to an outdoor kitchen at a friend's place, with a relatively large charcoal type grill. At most of the kosher barbecue events the event organizers provide smokers/grills plus meats and many ingredients to ensure that everything is truly kosher. If needed, my team sponsor is prepared to purchase a grill/smoker which I will need to research once I know I will need it. I should note that I am not Jewish and did not grow up around any kosher households, so I am also studying some of the finer points about running a kosher kitchen and learning about kosher ingredients. Modern competition barbecue is an odd mix of modernist techniques and ingredients, right alongside ordinary-folk foods like margarine, and bottled sauces. For reference, the 4 categories for kosher events are: Chicken, Beef Ribs, Turkey, and Beef Brisket -to be served in that order. So far, I have been running smokeless tests on chicken and beef ribs. Mostly learning to trim the chicken thighs (what a nightmare!) and seeing what happens at certain temperatures and times. I know things will be different with real smoking happening, but I want to see some baseline results so that I know what to strive for. I do have a bunch of thermometers, and have got some basic ideas about writing a competition timeline. The chicken perplexes me in several ways. First, some of the competition cooks recommend boning while others recommend bone-in. Second, I see some folks injecting and brining, while others maybe do a quick half hour marinade, and even others are full-on modernist with citric acid under the skin, etc. Third, the braise vs non- braise chicken where some people load up their pan with a pound of butter, margarine or a couple cups of chicken stock while others do not. Fourth, The bite-through skin is driving me insane. Some people swear by transglutaminase to reattach the skin for a better bite. Catch is, only some types are kosher, and I can see having issues explaining it. I have tested an egg white egg wash which seems to attach the skin pretty well without showing. I think I need to go for longer times to get more tender skin. Today I did a pan (with olive oil) of six as follows: one hour at 220°, one hour under foil at 230°, then glazed and 20 minutes on a rack at 350°. It was only partly bite-though and the taste-testers wanted more crispiness. I tried showing them pictures and explained that it wasn't ever going to be crispy, that we're looking to go even softer. I am going to run tests on longer cook periods and see how it goes. I want to ask people about the whole swimming in margarine thing which is in voque right now. people claim it makes the chicken juicy. I know that meat is mostly all about temperatures. I can see how the margarine acts like duck fat in a confit and helps prevent some oven-drying after hours and hours in the oven, but, in the end, isn't it just an insulator? I've been making corned beef and other brisket dishes for over 20 years, so, I think I have a good handle on that. I will practice it in a couple of weeks. I simply don't need as much help on this item. The turkey scares me. On TV, I see people dunking it in butter before serving it. This obviously is not kosher, and I don't want to do it with margarine I don't want to present anything in a competition made with margarine, there has to be something better! -Either cook the bird better or find a better dip, like maybe a flavorful nut oil or a sauce. That said, unlike ribs or brisket, it is not traditional to dunk turkey in a sauce. I went with some friends to a chain place called Dickies to do a little research and their turkey breast was odd and kind of hammy. Not like Virginia ham, more like ham lunchmeat. It was very moist and unlike any turkey I have ever eaten. Ok, I admit to not being very fond of turkey, so my experiences with it have been a bit limited. I am assuming it was brined. Given the limited amount of time we will have (about a day and a half) to cook, I am planning on just cooking the breast. Other than that, I am open to suggestions. The internet has been least informative on the topic of turkey. People's videos and such just show rubbing the whole bird and letting it roast for a few hours. Any tips at all would be appreciated. Whew! Thanks for reading all of this, I look forward to any advice you can give.
  9. Modernist Bread is out now, but maybe you haven't taken the plunge. Here's your chance to win your own copy, courtesy of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Cooking Lab has provided us with a couple of other prizes that will go to a second and third winner: second place will win an autographed poster and calendar, and third place will receive an autographed poster. They are also providing an autographed bookplate for the first place winner's copy of Modernist Bread. The rules are simple: we are going to post recipes from the book that the team at The Cooking Lab has graciously provided for this purpose. To enter into the contest, you need to bake one or more of these recipes and post about them in the official contest topics by the end of November 2017. Winners will be drawn at random from those posting pictures and descriptions of their completed loaves. Complete rules and other details can be found here. For part two, we're featuring another cornerstone recipe from the book: Direct Country-Style Bread. The only leavener here is instant yeast, so production time is considerably shortened. The relative lack of flavor compared to long-proofed doughs is offset by the use of whole grains. Courtesy of The Cooking Lab, here's that recipe (extracted from the book and reformatted for purposes of this contest):
  10. Next week marks the official release of the highly-anticipated Modernist Bread by Nathan Myhrvold and Francisco Migoya. The eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters is excited to provide you with the opportunity to win a copy of the book. The Cooking Lab has provided us with a couple of other prizes that will go to a second and third winner: second place will win an autographed poster and calendar, and third place will receive an autographed poster. They are also providing an autographed bookplate for the first place winner's copy of Modernist Bread. The rules are simple: we are going to post recipes from the book that the team at The Cooking Lab has graciously provided for this purpose. To enter into the contest, you need to bake one or more of these recipes and post about them in the official contest topics by the end of November 2017. Winners will be drawn at random from those posting pictures and descriptions of their completed loaves. Complete rules and other details can be found here. For our first recipe, we're starting with a cornerstone recipe from the book: French Lean Bread. I've personally made this one and it's both delicious and completely approachable by anyone with an interest in this book. Courtesy of The Cooking Lab, here's that recipe (extracted from the book and reformatted for purposes of this contest): The recipes in this book tend to rely on information presented more extensively earlier in the books, so if anything isn't clear enough here please ask and Dave and I will do our best to answer your questions (we've had early digital access to the books for the last month or so). ETA: Here's what my first go at the recipe sounded like coming out of the oven...
  11. Yes, the vacuum blender, Luddites. http://www.gadgetreview.com/what-is-a-vacuum-blender I am waiting for the WiFi version, so I can turn my smoothie into soup from Mars.
  12. Hi, I've tried to make the spherical mussels recipe from the Modernist Cuisine books and it didn't work as I expected, so I would appreciate any advice that may help here. The recipe calls for calcium gluconate which I couldn't get hold of, so I replaced it with calcium lactate gluconate that I had at home. I used the same ration (2.5%) When I tried to create the spheres in the sodium alginate bath I encountered two main problems; 1. instead of spheres the mixture just stayed as uneven shape on the surface. The bath was 1Kg. water with 5gr. sodium alginate and I let it rest in the fridge for 24 hours before using it so I think the problem is not here. However, the mussels jus mixture (100gr. mussels jus, 0.5gr. xanthin gum and and 2.5gr. calcium lactate gluconate) had a lot of air bubbles in it. Can that be the issue? 2. In the book the spheres seem to be completely transparent whereas my mussels jus mixture was pretty white and opaque. Is it because I replaced calcium gluconate with calcium lactate gluconate? Or maybe it's because the jus itself should be clarified before it is used? Thanks in advance for your support, Tom.
  13. Hi :-) Bought 1.7Kg pork chunk, might be a bit of weird cutting, seems like a rack of pork chops caught between V shaped in bones. Would like to sous vide it whole without further cutting to single steaks and would be glad to get a direction for temp and time, from what i've seen 60-62C area might be great to keep it juicy but i'm lost with the time, as it is a big chunk and not single steaks.. Thanks !
  14. Wikipedia defines pork wings as: a pork product made from the fibula of a pig's shank - a single bone surrounded by lean, tender meat. Images from the internet look like a finger-size bit of meat around a bone. Mine, however, look more like the meat (lots) which surrounds a bone. My butcher called this cut pork wings. You can see on the right that there's a small amount of bone. My butcher said he regularly ate SEVERAL of these. But this one measures 15 oz (425g). He also said it had to be cooked slowly. So, if I cook these sous vide, what temp and for how long?
  15. So I was having company for the opening Football season. One of the local food store had Hamburger patties on sale. So, I opted to use them 85/15 chuck. They were only probably 3/4 " thick. When I got them home.. that seemed like a wimpy thickness. So , Idea Lets fuse 2 patties using Activa -RM-- so I treated one side ( dusted like a chicken breast ) - put together, and place them in frig for about 2 hrs.. to meld Took them out about 45 min prior to cook. Then off to my flat top to cook.. usually these thick burgers 1 1/2 icnches, get a big blood bubble in the middle, even if you dent them prior to cooking. What I notice with the Activa-Rm barrier in the middle , this really didn't happen. thick the meat juice collected just under, that in-side half. So i flipped and cooked side two. Really was amazed how uniform they cook and how the juices real stayed inside. No pictures as the game was on. Just thought I would share. PB
  16. Anyone has done that? I did once in the past, using time and temperature from David Chang Momofuku, which was 82C for 3 hours. And it was still though. I didn't put anything in the bag, just abalone. The abalone was not fresh, but frozen raw abalone, about 10 cm lengthwise, and it was defrosted overnight in the fridge. Going to do this again soon, so I thought if anyone has done it please share your results. I am thinking to do at 82C for 6 hours, and put a little bit of olive oil in the bag. Note: I searched this forum for abalone, but it seems it's not that popular ingredients. Few posted about sous-vide, but without end result reports.
  17. daveb

    Sous Vide Demo

    At a local culinary store I have a hobby/job helping local Chef's do cooking demonstrations, prepping for catered events and all kinds of other things that let me play with new toys and other peoples food. I've been asked to prepare a Sous Vide Demo meal to stimulate interest in SV and modern technique - and hopefully sell some SV units. Menu to be Mi Cuit Salmon (104F from Chef Steps), Asparagus Salad w poached egg, 72 hr Short Ribs w Cauliflower puree and a Poached Pear desert.
  18. NOTE: This continues the discussion in What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 1) A New Zealand Strip Steak. The animals are kept on what they call a zero, zero program. No antibiotics, no hormones, grain fed with no gmo. Lightly seasoned, and into a 129F bath for 2 hours. Seared on the little BGE and served. ]
  19. I've done a lot of online research but can't find any recipe that uses both smoking and sous vide. I've recently added a vertical box smoker to my arsenal and would love to incorporate it with my sous vide methods. In other words, meat in a smoker generally only takes on smoke for the first hour, so what would be the harm in smoking something like a tri tip for an hour, immediately vaccuum sealing it and placing it into a bath at 132 or so? It seems like an ideal way to get the best of both worlds. A good idea? Bad idea? Why aren't there more recipes using this combination? I'm aware of incorporating liquid smoke into pouches, but this seems like a pefect way to achieve both smoke and tenderness. Thoughts?
  20. Anyone have a good time and temp for sous vide chicken thighs? I'm looking for really tender meat, but still juicy and not mealy. I have tried 156f for 3 hours and 6 hours which is pretty good, but looking for more opinions. How about Sous vide duck legs time and temps? Thanks!
  21. Can frozen raw meat be defrosted more quickly in a water bath? Is it safe to do that? What time and temperature are recommended? Thanks! (I did a search and couldn't quickly find anything on this subject, but if there is, feel free to point me towards it)
  22. Hi there.Does anyone have any knowledge on storing their spheres (from spherification) for long(ish) periods of time? i have read that you can put them in a solution of the same flavour and they will maintain their state. i would like to know whether it would be possible to put these in a jar and pasteurise them by bringing them to 72c since alginate gels are supposedly non-thermoreversible so they shouldn't melt. or possibly i might make the spheres using another gelling agent like pectin or gellan gum, both of which are also unaffected by reasonably high heat sources. if anyone has any thought on this i would be very appreciative such as whether this idea would work and if so, how long i might be able to keep them and whether they would need to be refrigerated.the sugar concentration in the spheres and the solution would be relatively high which i would imagine would also aid in the preservation. ideally i would like to be able to store them unrefrigerated. thanks.
  23. So I looking now, at the vacmaster.vp112,and anova pro,would love to get them both but I'm not able,so the question is,get the vp112 sealer and cheapo immersion circulator,or get whatever sealer sins you can even cook food sous vide in Ziploc bags,and get the Anova Pro circulator? What makes more sens in your opinion guys?
  24. I have this sauce, or more like a stock. It is not a demiglace, it is just made on bones, meat and vegetables that have been browned. Varmed, it is the nicest rich sauce. Cold, it stands very stiff and hard. I would like to serve it in the jelly-like state, in cubes, but I would like it to be 50-60C when served, at which point it would melt again. I have been playing with, and reading about gels alot here lately and came to think.. Maybe I can create a synergy between gelatin and another gelling agent that would make it heat-stable up to this temperature. Google-searches gave nothing yet, so did anyone try something like this?
  25. Hello, I'd like to get some steaks done SV and am trying to work out the timing in my head. I'd like to get food on the table within half an hour of getting home from work, which leaves me with a couple of options 1) use a cut of meat (blade steak, round steak, etc) that requires 10ish hours, and start it before I leave in the morning 2) use a tender cut (ribeye, t-bone, etc) and start it in the morning 3) use a tender cut and cook it for the prescribed minimum time the night before, then reheat when I get home 1 is certainly viable but I'm not familiar enough with these types of steaks to do this with utmost confidence 2 (according to internet lore) will result in mushy steak 3 I guess I would cook the steak ahead of time, leave it in the bag, then put it back in the water as soon as I get home to bring back up to temperature. How are the results with this type of thing? When I think "reheat" my brain goes to microwaved steak. All would be seared before consumption of course. Any suggestions?
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