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Found 986 results

  1. Is now being served at Selfridges as a part of the Indian festivities. A friend just came back from London. He said it was the best Rabri he has ever eaten, period. Have any of the UK members tried it? What is the feedback? Worth coming to London for? Honest answers please. For you know I will do just that.
  2. What are the traditional dishes of Mughlai cuisine? What ingredients are typical?
  3. Hi, I just want an Indian perspective on this topic for a couple of questions. I know that Hyderabad biryani was the most recognized biryani and I will be going to Indian really soon. Here a Video that I found on YouTube about Hyderabad biryani https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhajwFlquPk Questions: 1. Why did they put so many ingredients in the process of making it? 2. Why did they put curd in the biryani? 3. Why did they put in white rice on top and not mixed? 4. Why did they pour hot water in the chicken?
  4. I have recently made trips to a Dosa spot that has been praised quite a lot around this site and elsewhere. I was terribly dissapointed. Dosas are one of my favorite foods. It is a pity that Indian restaurants in NYC have really not shared the magic that can come with each bite of a Dosa. Some friends of mine that have traveled to India and had loved Dosas even before making that trip, came back never wanting to eat American Indian Dosas again. There is such a marked difference. Why is that so? What makes them so different? Where do you find your favorite Dosa? What are you looking for in a good Dosa? What do you think the perfect Dosa should be like? What should the Sambhaar have in it? What consistency should it be? What should the chutney be like? What chutneys would you like to eat it with? What do you think are the authentic companions to a Dosa?
  5. Which are the pickles you have in your pantry right now? Which are the ones you dream of? Any recipes? Any secrets? Any reading material? Please share - as Monica says Inquiring minds want to know...
  6. Do you guys have any experience using these "Roti Maker"s? So far, using Google, I have found a "Revel" brand Roti Maker and a "ChefMaster" branc Chappathi maker. Any experience using these or any others? Here's the Revel Roti Maker, Model #360: Here's the Chefmaster Chappathi Maker, Model CM01:
  7. Come on now, lets hear it.. what spicy chicken recipe (Indian inspired) do you love.. why? Is it the spicy chettinand? Chicken 65? Malabar Chilli Chicken? Your own creation? I have super selfish movites... I want to try something new
  8. Lately i've been wondering about the use of food colouring in Indian food. Is there a traditional aesthetic use of it, or is it maybe to reproduce the colour that chilli powder or saffron would have given to a dish?
  9. When was it? Where was it (restaurant, home or other)? How did it come about? What did you think of it? What did you like most? What did you not enjoy at all? Was it love or hate that first time? How did it change your eating habbits, or has it? Have you ever cooked it at home? Have you introduced it to other non-Indians? What have their first reactions been? What dishes do you think ought to be used for the first introduction to this complex and varied cuisine?
  10. I received a bookstore gift card and decided to buy an Indian cookbook (to fill in a noticeable gap in my cookbook collection). If you could own only one Indian cookbook, what would it be?
  11. This is one of my daughter favorite dishes, being mild and less spicy she loves this rice dish. Its super easy to make and goes well with most Indian curries. Do try this out and I am sure you will be happy with the results. Prep Time : 5 mins Cook Time: 5 mins Serves: 2 Ingredients: 1 cup rice(basmati), cooked 1/2 cup coconut, shredded or grated 1 green chili, slit 1 dried red chili 1 1/2 tablespoon oil/ghee(clarified butter) 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds 1/2 tablespoon chana dal(split chickpeas) 1/2 tablespoon urad dal(split black gram) 1 teaspoon ginger, finely chopped A pinch of hing (asafoetida) Few curry leaves Salt to taste Directions 1) Heat oil/ghee(clarified butter) in a pan in medium flame. I used coconut oil here because it tastes best for this dish. 2) Add mustard seeds, cumin seeds, chana dal(split chickpeas), urad dal(split black gram), green chili, dried red chili, ginger and curry leaves. Fry this for 30 seconds in medium flame. The trick is to ensure that these are fried but not burned. 3) Add a pinch of hing(asafoetida) and mix well. 4) Now add the cooked rice and coconut. Stir well for about 15 to 20 seconds and switch off the flame. 5) Finally add salt into this and mix well. You could add peanuts or cashew nuts if you prefer. Goes well with most curries.
  12. Tomato Chutney I have missed this chutney for the longest of time. Growing up in Delhi, my sisters best friend in school was from the South. (Andhra Pradesh to be precise. Andhra is most famous for their pickles and chutneys). Her mother would make the best tomato chutney. A couple of years ago, experimenting with some really ripe tomatoes and relying on my memory, I came up with the recipe. It really tastes like Durgas mothers recipe. I now make it all the time. And in fact, when tomatoes are in season and ripe and bursting with flavor and juice, I make a lot of this chutney, can it and give it out as gifts to friends when visiting them. It is a fiery chutney for most palates. But those that are familiar with Andhra pickles and chutneys will find it just average. I love the chutney with fenugreek seeds, they add a slight bitterness to the chutney that I love. If you are not a fan of bitter tastes, avoid using it. 8 pounds very ripe beefsteak tomatoes, chopped finely 1 1/2 cup canola oil 40 fresh curry leaves 16 whole dried red chiles 2 tablespoon mustard seeds 1 tablespoon cumin seeds 1/4 teaspoon fenugreek seeds, optional 1/3 cup sugar 2 tablespoon cayenne (half if you want a milder chutney) 2 tablespoon coriander seed powder 1 tablespoon paprika 1 tablespoon sambhaar powder 2 teaspoon turmeric 1/2 teaspoon asafetida 1 6 oz. can of tomato paste 3 tablespoon salt, or more to taste 1. Pour the oil in a large sauce pot, enough to hold the tomatoes and then some. It is important that the pot be deep, as the chutney will simmer a long while and will splatter otherwise all over your stove and counter. 2. Measure out all the dried spices other than the asafetida into a bowl and set aside. 3. In the oil add the curry leaves, whole red chiles, mustard seeds, cumin seeds and fenugreek seeds if using. Fry over a medium high flame for 3 minutes or until the chiles are a nice dark color and the cumin are a nice golden brown. 4. Now add the asafetida and fry for half a minute. Add the dried spices and fry for barely half a minute and add the chopped tomatoes. Add the salt and sugar. Stir well and cook on this medium high flame for an hour and a half or until the oil has separated and the chutney begins to stick to the bottom of the pan. 5. Fill the chutney into 10 sterilized half-pint jars and process as per manufacturers instructions for 20 minutes. 6. Cool, check for seal, label and store.
  13. I make this a lot. Traditionally served with dosa, but great with all kinds of Indian food, even just scooped up with bread or pappads for a snack. Although it's slightly different every time, depending on the tomatoes and chillies used, plus the strength of the tamarind, it's easy, quick to make and always delicious. In a blender - half a medium red onion chopped, 7 dried red chillies broken up a bit, 2 ripe tomatoes chopped, 1 tsp of sea salt, 3 tsp tamarind paste. Whizz until purée like about 2 minutes. In a sauté pan over medium heat add 60 ml sesame oil (gingelly), when it's hot but not smoking add 1 tsp black mustard seeds. Quickly cover the pan to prevent escape and sizzle for a minute. Add 1 tsp of urad dal (black lentils, skinned and split they are light grey). Fry until golden, another minute or so. Throw in about 20 curry leaves. These splatter so cover the pan again. Lower the heat and add the blender contents. Simmer, stirring frequently for about 10 minutes, until you get a runny jam consistency. Ta da !
  14. I thought I'd share with you my experiences in building a Tandoori Oven in a beer keg. I have always been a fan of Indian food, even from a young age. I just love it hot and spicy. When I was a teenager I tried out for a job at the local Indian take-away making Naan bread. Needless to say, I couldn't hack the heat and resulting burnt arm! However, my interest did not dwindle in Tandoor cooking. Why in a beer keg you ask? Because I had one sitting in the shed for about 10 years taking up space. I'm not even sure how got it in the first place (or why), but I'm guessing I had some crazy idea about making a pot belly stove, BBQ or something else like an ethanol extraction unit. Myself and the family really enjoy Naan bread and buying it was getting expensive. I had tried making it too, and although it was OK, I couldn't get the top and bottom to cook simultaneously with the correct, crispy skin you get. I tried everything, and the best method was a red hot charcoal BBQ, cooking the bread on the grill, and flipping it over to finish the top off. Recently I had found a few posts about home built Tandoori Ovens. Cool! Exactly what I wanted - a real Tandoor to cook the bread in. I sketched up a few ideas on a Napkin (the normal starting point for all great plans) and then translated the concept in Sketch-up. Essentially the Tandoor is built from firebricks and a Terra Cotta pot. The keg holds everything together, and keeps the vermiculite in place providing thermal insulation for the terra cotta. The pot is actually inverted and has the base cut off. A small door was also required for ventilation at the bottom.
  15. So due to a variety of factors I have decided to cook Indian for the next 3 months. Pursuant to that I purchased the other day a coffee grinder for spice-related grinding. Today and tomorrow I will be stocking the pantry with whatever other hardware and software is necessary. So I'm interested in hearing what are the staples of the Indian pantry. wet ingredients, dry ingredients, canned stuff, whatnot. So far on the list: Spices peppercorns fenugreek cumin kalonji cloves cinnamon Other dry: basmati rice chick peas wet onion garlic ginger I know I can gather a list like this by making a bunch of indian dishes and seeing what spices they need, but I'm looking to get a ready to go pantry so that when I get ready to cook I already have some of the shopping done. Many thanks, Ben
  16. A new restuarant recently opened in vancouver with a Sri Lankan family making hoppers. Are these a staple item in Sri Lankan homes? This restaurant gives you three on a plate, one with a soft poached egg in the middle, along with a choice of curry, shredded coconut and chutney. I've never seen these before. Any background information would be great. Stephen Vancouver
  17. I had lunch today at the Indian Supper club in the worldgate center in reston. They have the lunch time buffet for $9. I have been to a lot of indian buffets and i can definetly say that this was the worst indian buffet I've ever eaten. The rice was greasy (i'm assuming alot of ghee), the quality of rice used was poor, the selection of condiments and dishes was limited. What was there was bland and poor. I will not go back to this place. What a waste of time and money.
  18. The terminology appears to vary from country to country, and region to region, but I'm wondering if anyone knows what the words "SEEK" and "SISH" means, and where they come from -- as well as what they apply to. I was introduced to these kind of kebabs at Abdul's Takeaway in Manchester, England. There, the seek kebab was made of minced lamb -- and it tends to be the same here in the US, except they tend to substitute beef due to local preferences. Their sish kebab was chunks of lamb, marinated. I just heard someone refer to a ground chicken kebab as "Chicken Seek Kebab" and I wondered, does seek mean lamb? Or does it just mean ground? And what does sish mean? Would really appreciate some enlighted comments on this one... Thanks! Edit: Okay, I snooped around a bit, and have found that "Sish" is a generic term for anything that's skewered, possibly of Turkish origin. Wikipedia lists "Seek" as Pakistani in origin, but it doesn't say anything about the word's original meaning. So I guess what I'm asking is, does seek mean minced, or lamb, or something else?
  19. Is there any stores in Buenos Aires where to get those unusual Indian and Central Asian spices? thanks
  20. I wonder if any of you have had a similar experience.Often when i make a paste of onions in a blender,it gets very bitter.The first time this happened,i did not even realise it and proceeded to fry it in oil,add the usual masalas etc and made a gravy.But when we ate it,the gravy was positively bitter.After that,everytime i made the onion paste,i would first taste it raw and throw out the whole lot if it were bitter.All this was very wasteful,not to mention irritating.After that i started either grating the onions,or chopping them very fine and than proceeding to fry in oil,but when i needed a really smooth gravy,i had to put the whole thing in a blender after it was done or use my stick blender.The cleaning was painful,because the paste would be oily after having been roasted in oil.All in all very cumbersome! Of late ,this does not happen,and also if i process the onions in a food processor as opposed to a blender,it seems to help too. Wanted to know if any of you folks had encountered the same problem and if you have any solution for it. thanks
  21. Hema's is great but the service (lack thereof) amd wait is really a drag-Have taken friends to Hema's, Viceroy, Ghandi and Tippen. Looking for another place for variety sake. Prefer nonvegetarian. Heard that Bhabi's on Oakley is really good. Anyone been? Thanks.
  22. mostly brought up on vegetarian Indian food, I would like to know the wonderful uses of the two spices. I did find out from internet searches that kabab chini is all spice but have not much clue how to use them in Indian cooking p.s. I am a converted non-veggie so feel free to encompass meats in your suggestions
  23. So, I finally got my paws on a copy of Dastarkhwan-e-Awadh. There's a nice recipe for this extravagant masala "available in. . . a few selected shops in old Lucknow" in the glossary. It calls for both jarakush and baobeer. Anybody know anything about these critters? Also, many of the recipes finish with a combo of keora and mitha ittr. Can anybody tell me anything about mitha ittr? (Other than it's a sweet perfume? )
  24. using the following as the standard criteria: for regional chinese: grand sichuan on 9th bet 50/51st for thai: the original wondee siam on 9th bet 52/53rd & pam real on 49th nr 9th av which 1-2 indian restaurants should be listed?
  25. I've heard this rumor a couple of times recently that there's a really good Indian Restaurant in the upstairs of Natl. Wholesale Liquidators on 17. Does anybody know anything about this? Is there any juice to it, or are people severly misguided
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