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Found 988 results

  1. I was reading Italian Food by Elizabeth David when I came across a recipe where you first fry onions in oil, then add the lentils, fry some more, add water and cook until the lentils are done. That made me wonder if such a practice exists in Indian cooking. Does it? Any advantages of doing this? Suman
  2. Welcome Monika, Are you from a Marwari family? What is the Indian grocery situation like in Finland-are you able to get all the essentials or is it difficult to find things, like....besan for instance?
  3. There's probably an obvious answer to this, but here goes. In Indian restaurants which do buffets, I've noticed their quantity cooked pappadums are always perfectly flat. Sometimes whole, sometimes cut in half, but still flat and very easy to stack or lean against each other. How is this accomplished? Whenever I do mine, it's either fried or cut in half with each half placed in a toaster, all the while keeping an eye on them in order to rotate the halves before they scorch. But they always come out wavy and not at all flat and stackable this way. Doesn't bother me in the least, but it would be easier to transport flat ones. Pat
  4. Hello Everyone, I got inspired by a can of blackeyed peas in my cupboard and a bunch of dill sitting in my fridge. Here is what I came up with. This recipe isn't officially written or tested, but its simple so it should work out fine. It turned out delicious. Gujarati-Style Blackeyed Peas with Dill (Lobhia aur Suwa) 3 tablespoons ghee or oil or a mixture 3/4 teaspoon mustard seeds 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds 1/8 teaspoon fenugreek seeds 1 medium onion, finely chopped (about 1 cup) 1 large garlic clove, minced 1 cup peeled and diced fresh tomato 1 teaspoon Gujarati or Marathi-style garam masala, divided 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/4 teaspoon red chili powder 1/4 teaspoon turmeric 1 teaspoon sugar (optional) 1 (15.5 ounce) can blackeyed peas, with liquid 3/4 cup coarsely choppped fresh dill Water as needed Salt to taste In a medium saucepan heat the ghee or oil over medium-high heat. When hot toss in the mustard seeds. As soon as they begin to splutter and pop add the cumin and fenugreek seeds. Cook until the cumin darkens a few shades. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until it begins to turn golden, about 8 minutes. Add the garlic and stir for 1 minute more. Add the tomato to the pan and cook, stirring, until it begins to turn to pulpy sauce, about 3 minutes. Toss in half of the garam masala and all of the paprika, red chili powder, turmeric and the sugar if using. Stir once or twice. Now stir in the blackeyed peas with their liquid and the dill. Add enough water until you get the consistency you want, up to 1 1/2 cups. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and simmer, covered, for about 10 minutes. Stir in salt to taste, the remaining garam masala and 2-3 tablespoons more chopped dill before serving. I ate it with plain basmati rice and a raita, but if you make it on the drier side it would go great with rotli. Try this and let me know what you think. If you don't have Gujarati or Marathi-style garam masala, the regular kind will work fine. Though I would avoid a pure Moghul garam masala, it is too cardamomy for this. You can make an approximate version by adding a little fennel seeds, ajwain, sesame seed, dried red chili and a star anise to your regular garam masala recipe.
  5. Does anyone out there have an Indian recipes to share on Okra? A friend recently send me a huge box of it from her garden and I'm tired of using them as thickeners for my Gumbo.
  6. The heartwarming festival of Janamashtmi is around the corner. This festival celebrates the birth of Lord Krishna. I am planning a prayer service at home and would like to follow it with a meal. What would you all suggest? What is typical..? I hope our newest member who cooked at the ISCKON temple will help me out here.
  7. This topic might drop a clue as to why I haven't been doing much posting of late I'd like to make sure my baby doesn't get addicted to Kellogg-MickeyD industrial food, and in order to do that I thought I should start early... by avoiding the Gerber in favor of more interesting international flavors. So - what is fed to infants and toddlers in various parts of India? When is a good time to introduce the baby to various spices? Any old (Indian) wives tales about what to watch out for? For that matter, what do infants and toddlers get fed in other parts of the world?
  8. Jigg Karla's Daawat has a recipe for Mustard chutney marinated grilled bataer (quail). One of the ingredients is Kashundi (bengali bottle mustard). Can one our Bengali or otherwise knowledgable friends elaborate?? Thanks
  9. I've been wanting to experiment with a mango curry dish for a while, and tonight I did. I'm not sure how it turned out. Out of all my cookbooks, the only recipe I found was supposed to be a Sri Lankan sour curry. The basic ingredients were green mangoes, onions, coconut milk (I made it fresh), and Sri Lankan roasted curry powder (I made it myself). I thought I had picked up some green mangoes at the grocer but they were actually Haitian mangoes which were ripe and sweet. To compensate for this I soaked the mangoes in some water with amchoor and lemon juice hoping it would kill the sweetness. I also added a little amchoor while I was cooking. The end result was interesting, and I'm not sure if I liked it. Although the onions weren't overpowering I could definitely taste them a little in there and I don't know if it's an acquired taste or I just screwed up the dish. Any thoughts? I'm sure there are a zillion ways to use mangos, but what is a good mango curry supposed to taste like? I found one of Madhur Jaffrey's on a website that used ripe mangoes and jaggery with no onions...That sounds a little too fruity for a main dish for my taste. How are mango curries typically eaten? With what accompaniments/rice/breads? -Richie
  10. Although it's not blue, and you can't clean windows with it, Monica Bhide makes a compelling argument about how Basil is like Windex. However, you must have a copies of "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" cued up on your VCR or DVD player to read this article! After returning from the video store, read on... (P.S. - We're kidding. Read on anyway...) * * * Be sure to frequently check The Daily Gullet home page daily for new articles, hot topics, site announcements, and more.
  11. I am going to cook an Indian meal friday. Not sure what dishes, but I shall cook from two books, both by our experts from egullet. I have ordered books by Monica Bhide and Suvir Saran. They arrive later today and what inspires me shall be prepared for mom, girl friend and non-indian friends. What wines would be safe ones for me to buy? Any ideas? Or am I too naive to think I can buy wines in advance of having a menu planned? Guidelines for pairing wine with Indian food??
  12. Perusing the international cookbooks at my local Barnes & Noble today and what did I spy but the new cookbook by our own Suvir Saran, "Indian Home Cooking"! So of course I picked up a copy. It appears to be chock full of excellent and very approachable recipes, as well as Suvir's terrific notes and comments regarding his remembrances of each dish. Although I couldn't resist bringing it home from the B&N, I did check to see if it's available on Amazon through the eGullet link. It is, of course, and ten bucks cheaper. Congratulations, Suvir. Well done. I know you're proud and you should be.
  13. Hi, I want to cook a version of mushroom sukke that my sister-in-law makes. I need to use triphala for it. The only way I've seen it being used is in its whole form. They boil it in water and use the water to flavour the dish or use it in tadka. I want to know if I could roast it up and powder it - I have a limited stock, so can't afford to waste it on experimentation. That's also the reason I'd rather not use them whole and then discard them if I can help it. I know this has been discussed elsewhere and remember Episure mentioning roasting and grinding it. I wonder if the flavour is more potent when you grind it? Can you grind it finely to a powder? Will the ground spice lend a bitter taste to the dish or a produce a tingling sensation in the mouth, the kind you get when you suck on a szechuan peppercorn? And you're right Episure - this spice deserves more recognition than it gets. I absolutely love its aroma and the flavour it lends to the dish. Any advice greatly appreciated. Thanks, Suman
  14. I picked up an Indian Cookbook from the library yesterday - Easy Indian Cooking by Suneeta Vaswani. I couldn't follow any recipe exactly last night because I don't have the full complement of Indian spices, but I did make a chicken dish with yogurt, curry powder, hot peppers, onion and garlic. Although it was very tasty, I would like to be more authentic. So today I went to two international markets in my town to look for ingredients. I couldn't find mustard seeds or poppy seeds or fenugreek. I bought some coriander seeds, and basmati rice from Thailand. I did see lots of curry powder. Do the average Indians make everything from scratch, or do they use curry powder? What basic spices should I get? The book recommends whole seeds rather than already ground. Can you recommend any mail order companies?
  15. I've been entrusted to make seekh kebabs this weekend. Trouble is, I can never get the ground lamb to stick to the flat skewers when turning over. Instead, they fall off the skewer. I'd rather not use egg as a binder. Any suggestions? Roy
  16. Have a duck in our freezer, that seems to call to me, "Eat me, Eat me"... Have googled "recipes indian duck"...About a bazillion hits on Bombay Duck, which of course, is fish... A couple recipes for "Duck Vindaloo"...While almost any of gods creatures would indeed be enhanced by preparation Vindaloo style, I can't seem to find much else. Is waterfowl not popular in India?, or am I just not looking in the right places?
  17. I buy my fish from chinese market in New Jersey and I have seen lots of packaging which they keep outside marked with Indian or Bangladeshi cargo mark. They have live Eel kept at the counter and it is in the Air Biman cargo boxes, similalrly I have bought Pomfret there with Bombay cargo markings. Also seen shrimps with Orissa packging in that shop as well as in Costco. So lot of fish does come from India it seems.
  18. I've recently began eating East Indian cuisine and wondered if anyone can suggest a good inexpensive restaurant. I've tried a few in Vancouver and would prefer not to travel further. I know Surrey has a lot of very good restaurants but my eating companions are hard-core Vancouverites. There are lots along the Main and 49th corridor, as well as Marine Drive and 60-ish. What places have eGulliteers tried?
  19. I am doing some research and could really use some assistance. Are you on a lowcarb diet or on Atkins -- are you preparing any any Indian dishes.. PM me if you are upto doing a short interview with me i am also looking for boards on Atkins in India and any other related materials.. would love your help
  20. Hi All, I am working with BBHasin on a class for eGCI teaching Indian breads. ANy favorites that you would like to learn about?
  21. I'd posted this question in an earlier discussion, but it got buried somewhere, so here it is again: What unusual things do you bring back from India? I've brought varak, copper vessels, the traditional butter-churner (mathani, even though I don't use it - mainly for decoration purposes), dried rose petals, bamboo shoots in brine, raw mangoes in brine.... Still on my list/wish list: Hyderabad ka potli masala, brass vessels, the black claypot my grandma used to make her famous fish curry in, surahi (a bit far-fetched I know), bharanis. Suman
  22. I am thinking of organizing a tasting of Indian wines paired with Indian food here.. what do folks think? This is a new distributor who is gaining a lot of credibility in the market place for Indian wines.. is there an interest?
  23. Hi folks, Before I delve into the details of this little-known cuisine, I'd like to introduce myself. I feel really lucky to have come across this wonderful forum where everyone is passionate about the same thing as me - Indian food. My name is Suman Varadaraj and I live in Dublin, Ireland. I used to be the Indian Food Guide at About.com - the best part of my job was helping all those who wrote in with their queries to discover the wonderful world of Indian food. I've lived in Ghaziabad in U.P. (Have you heard of it Suvir?), Bombay, Mangalore, Bangalore and Dubai. It might come as a big surprise , but I am, of course Konkani. We're a small community and yet it's amazing to see the variations in the cooking styles, depending on where we come from. - My parents are from Mangalore, which is a coastal town down south in the state of Karnataka, famous for its wonderful seafood. We love our fish and our food is 'bold' in the sense that it makes liberal use of garlic. - My husband comes from Bangalore and their food is more 'saathvik' - it leans towards the famous Udupi-style of cooking. They use very little garlic, if any and their food is purely vegetarian. They also tend to add a little jaggery to their side dishes. - My maternal grandma's family was amongst the many Konkani families in Northern Kerala, they have some distinctive dishes not known to other Konkanis. In general though Konkani food can be described as thus: Ghashis: Coconut, chillies and tamarind ground with or without any additional ingredient and made into a sauce for fish, beans or even chicken. The baghaar or tadka also differs. Sukke: Dry vegetable dish, again using coconut, chillies and tamarind with ingredients such as roasted or raw coriander, urad dal etc. Upkari: A stir-fry of vegetables - in Mangalore they generally prefer it with a baghaar of mustard and red chillies , in Bangalore it's usually mustard, green chillies, curry leaves and grated coconut Thalasani: Again, a stir -fry of vegetables, but with garlic and chillies. Thoy/Kholombo: The former being Konkani-style toor dal, the latter being our version of the sambhar. I could go on and on, but at the outset I hadn't even intended to write so much. I'd love to know if any of you have ever come across Konkani food or have tried to make it at home. Thanks for making me feel welcome on this forum. Suman
  24. There are chains of Chinese, Japanese, Mexican, Italian, Jamaican restaurants( to name a few ethnic ones.) and whether you are a fan or not, the fact is that chain restaurants do a fair bit to promote that Country's cuisine. This ultimately benefits stand alone operators too as more diners become exposed to the cuisine. Why hasn't any Indian restaurant come to the fore? My guess is that the cuisine has to be doctored a little bit to give it broader appeal. Any thoughts?
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