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Found 976 results

  1. White Butter

    Hi, I have a friend who tells me there is something called white butter. I have tried googling it, but can't find anything about it. What is it and is there a western equivalent. Thanks
  2. Coconuts

    Howdy! I have some general coconut questions concerning picking out and opening a coconut. Does Indian food usually/aways use brown coconuts, or sometimes green or does it not matter? Is there any way to tell before you buy it if the coconut is rotten, or do you just have to open it and taste the water? I look for uncracked heavy coconuts that you can hear the swishing of the water inside, but this has been fallible. Julei Sahni says cracking a coconut using the back of a knife or cleaver is dangerous. She recommends piercing the eyes, baking it for half an hour, wrapping it in a towel, whacking it and then whacking it some more. I've tried it both ways and much prefer whacking it with the back of a knife to baking it. Why is this unsafe? What body part of mine am I endangering? Should I be wearing goggles? A gauntlet? Chain mail? Buying life insurance?
  3. Im taking my old man down to watch a spurs match in the new year and he likes a curry so i thought i see what London has to offer in terms of Indian food. Whats your favourite place? I hear Benares is closed for a bit because of that fire but im going in the new year so it should be open again should you want to include there. last indian i had in London was awful no doubt about that, london better provide this time.
  4. Apna Bazaar located in 2812 Audubon Village Drive in Audubon, Pa (610-635-1550) Is a JAM PACKED, Clean well stocked new Indian Pakistani grocery store in the burbs. It has so so much for a suburban market, many many frigerator and freezer sections PACKED with many different selections. Fresh Veg, big spice aisle, housewares etc. Check it out.
  5. Turmeric

    This is my first post on eGullet, so first I'll say Hello. I've recently discovered the delights of homestyle Indian food. I'm completely overwhelmed! There are so many regions and new ingredients and recipes and variations. And even the same food goes by different names and different spellings. It isn't easy! I hope you'll bear with me, because I'm sure to have many questions. But I truly want to learn -- so please let me know if I say something dumb. It wouldn't be the first time! My first question is about turmeric. Even in the same shop, there are bags of it that are rather yellow, ranging to gold, dark gold, and almost orange. Does the colour reflect the taste? If so, which is considered best? Or does one choose on some other basis? In the past I've occasionally bought some that tasted somewhat more bitter than usual. Is there a way to avoid that?
  6. Planning a trip to Chicago and looking for food that is unavailable here. Top of my list is Indian not of the buffet line variety. I am hopeful! Thanks for your input.
  7. Best Indian Markets in Texas

    We have a great eGullet forum on India and Indian Cuisine, with an incredible amount of information on cookbooks, favorite dishes, and styles of cooking from various regions, and much more. Suvir Suran did a great job as forum host before opening Amma in Manhattan to great acclaim. Now Monica Behide is the new forum host, and she welcomes all of us from Texas to visit. So it would be helpful to know more about all the Indian markets in Texas, especially DFW-Denton, Houston-Galveston, Austin and San Antonio. What are the favorite Indian markets in your area? Any special products or ingredients they carry that you have had a hard time finding in other places? How's quality, and how's the service?
  8. Lamb Curry--Cook-Off 4

    Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index. For our third Cook-Off, we've chosen Indian lamb curry. Yes, it's true: that's a huge category for a cook-off, and saying "Indian" is about as stupidly broad as saying "American." However, like gumbo, there are some basic elements to most of the many, many permutations of this dish, and several cook-off participants wanted to start cooking Indian at home with several options. So, instead of choosing a specific lamb curry, I thought that having a conversation about those different permutations (like the gumbo okra/roux discussion, say) would be interesting and fun. I also wanted to avoid too particular ingredients that some of our cook-off pals can't get in certain places. A few things that we can discuss, photograph, and share include: -- the spice mixture: If you've never toasted your own spices, then you have a world of aromatic wonder ahead. I'm sure many people can share their ingredients, ratios, and toasting tips for curry powders that will blow away the garbage in your grocery's "spice" aisle. We can also have the ground vs. whole debate, if there are takers! -- the paste: many curry dishes involve frying a blended paste of onion, garlic, and/or ginger, along with the spices, in oil or ghee (clarified butter). I found that learning how to cook that paste -- which requires the same sort of patience demanded by roux -- was the key to making a deep, rich curry. -- accompaniments: rice dishes or bread (I have a pretty good naan recipe that I'd be glad to try out again). Here are a couple of related eGullet threads: lamb kangari a lamb and goat thread If anyone finds more, post 'em! So: find yourself a leg of lamb to bone, sharpen your knives, and get ready to update your spice drawer!
  9. THE BEST: Indian

    I love Indian food, and I've lived in NYC all my life, but I still haven't really found a truly extraordinary Indian restaurant in the city. I'm finally going to check out Chola tonight, which I'm very excited about, but I'd still love to hear everyone else's thoughts and recommendations. I am ready to begin questing for a favorite. Plus, I couldn't find a thread that really gathered together a list of everyone's favorite Indian restaurants yet. So, let us remedy that gap in our collective knowledge: What do you think is the best Indian restaurant in NYC? And why?
  10. Porotta bread

    Another installment in my continuing exploration of Indian foods - I bought some frozen porotta from my Indian grocer. The directions say microwave on high @ 2 minutes on the first side, 1 minute on the second (after defrosting). This makes a hard, crunchy, flaky bread. Is this what it's supposed to be like? I only really know about naan, which is soft. Is this texture correct, or do I need to not nuke it quite so much? (Edited to correct punctuation)
  11. Welcome to the India: Cooking and Baking forum! This forum has a number of great resources for members, whether you're a novice or an expert. One of those resources is our online culinary academy, the eGullet Culinary Institute. Please take some time to look through the topics presented here and feel free to attend the course that interests you. Beginners Guide to Regional Indian Cooking Course and Q&A A Sampling of North Indian Breads Course and Q&A A Sampling of South Indian Breads Course and Q&A
  12. Fish

    A native of India has opened a small greengrocers close to my house. He is about to start carrying fish. He had a small sign up today, and darned if I can remember what they were except king fish, sardines, and anchovies. I gather he's actually importing them from India. What kinds of fish are commonly eaten in India?
  13. Indian Dessert

    I looked back over several years in this sub-Forum and found little about desserts. I am looking for a recipe for a wonderful dessert noodle pudding. The noodles are the size of angel hair and I recall sugar and milk being the other two main ingredients. We had a house fire in 1995 and I lost all my notes, this pudding being in it. Thanks.
  14. I am in London for a day. I would like to have authentic Indian without being ripped-off please can i get your suggestions.
  15. I just went to an Indian party and eat the best lamb patties ever with a great mint sauce , I am dying to make them myself any good recipes??? the patties were spicy and the sauce had yogurt I think ...Thanks
  16. So I've been living here in unincorporated Auburn (half way between Auburn and Fed-Way) and have not found a decent Indian restaurant yet! (Not that I've been trying very hard lately since my finicky toddler dislikes Indian food.) I really miss Taste of India up in the U-District. Anyone have any good suggestions for this area of WA? TIA!
  17. Goraka

    On a whim I bought some goraka because I have a weakness for buying things I don't know how to use. So what is the best way to use it? I understand it is a souring ingredient and particularly useful with fish but other then basic recipes, I haven't been able to find much other info. Can it be used as a substitute for tamarind?
  18. This is a really unique cuisine that I don't think many people know about, from the community that I come from. There is only 1 recipe book, used amongst members of my community ('South African Indian Delights'), and most recipes are taught in families. You haven't eaten it if you haven't been to someone's home. I've often wondered about starting a blog with some of the recipes, because the food really is exceptional. Does anyone here have any experience with it? Our food takes its inspiration from Indian food, but is very different - it has a lot of Portuguese, African, Dutch and even Middle Eastern influence. For example, our samosas are much smaller and lighter, usually bite-sized, and made of a very light pastry. They usually contain minced beef or chicken that is far plainer but more fragrant - using lots of coriander. We have an amazing thing called popta which are little balls of fried dough, again with minced beef (and egg) inside, but the way they're made kind of creates a pocket so that the filling doesn't touch the dough - there's a little gap of air around them. Our curries aren't as rich as Indian curries, our food is usually drier and more rice-based, and the spices much more delicate. The puri is like golden pillows, to die for, and actually all our breads are really amazing. Our naan is not a flatbread but a bread roll, kind of like challah, but with a different slightly different flavour. I'm sorry for being so eager about this, but it really is an undiscovered cuisine. I want people t know about it - it's so good - and I wish I had gone home for 6 months to learn to cook from my grandmother before she died (she was the best). I should perhaps do that with my other relatives, and then share what I learn with you all
  19. Mustard Oil

    I want to try a recipe which requires mustard oil. I went to a couple of Indian/Bangladeshi supermarkets in Brick Lane, London. They had 5l cans of 'Blended Edible' mustard oil, which I would never use all of. All the smaller bottles had 'External use only' printed on them. The shop assistant I asked said there was no difference and that they were labelled differently for import tax purposes. Is this true? Can I use the 'External Only' version for cooking?
  20. Barfi

    Hi, Has anyone made the Indian dessert Barfi? If so and it was successful could you let me have the recipe? Cheers! Richard
  21. Looking for a suggestion for good Indian near the strand, pre theatre next week. All suggestions appreciated. I was thinking red fort, but think it will be too far a walk.
  22. Kashmiri Tea

    Browing the adjacent store at Shalimar Restaurant in Salisbury, Md., I found a jar of Kashmiri tea with instructions on the side (I didn't have enough post-dinner cash to buy it). It said to boil the tea leaves with three glasses of water down to one, then adding more water and reboiling until it was the right shade of pink. Then there were further steps with milk, cardamom, pistachios, etc. My question is, how or why does it turn pink? The leaves looked green like other green tea.
  23. Diwali party

    Dear Friends Need help!! Planning a snacks party on Diwali. Please give suggestions for the menu and the recipes!!!!...
  24. I picked up a couple of packages of Shan brand spice mixes for a friend to experiment with. The instructions call for so-many "glasses" of water. How many ounces might that be? Is there some standard? Thanks, BB
  25. Madras Chicken Curry

    I love curry but can't eat it almost everyday as I used to because I live in Europe now. I sometimes get a takeaway from an Indian restaurant but at 20 euro per person, it's not something I can do often! The ready made spice packets sold at tokos are very milky and lacks the complicity and depth of the real thing. The Knorr packets are even worst (not at all spicy, apples, sweet etc.). I'd really appreciate it if someone could give me an authentic recipe for Madras chicken curry (post here or PM me). Thank you!
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