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Found 988 results

  1. Monica Bhide

    Railway food

    Travel by Indian rail? What did you enjoy at the stations or on the train? Come reminisce One of my favs was omlettes on a train from Delhi to Chandigarh....
  2. Suvir Saran

    Curry Powder

    If you are an Indian restaurant owner, chef or employee, could you please take some time and share with us what you know about the usage of store bought curry powder in your restaurants kitchen. Would you mind sharing with us what recipes you use it in. What role it plays in your kitchen. And where these recipes using curry powder come from. Thanks all!
  3. Monica Bhide

    Making Yogurt at home

    I love making yogurt at home. My method is very simple. Boil the milk - let it cool to the "pinky test" (if your pinky can stay in it for a full 20 seconds without your yelling bloody murder, then its ready). Add prepared yogurt ( about a spoon or so depending on the quantity of milk). Mix well. Pour milk into a bowl you can cover. Set overnight in a warm place (oven with pilot light on, or wrap the container in a towel). DOnt touch it for the rest of the night. in the morning you will have --> BTW_ this one is made with the low carb milk. It is the thickest best yogurt I have ever made. So what is your yogurt making secret???
  4. Hi. I was lucky enough to be asked to review Monica's Spice is Right Cookbook for the magazine internationalwoman.net and I found it very easy to follow, even for a novice like me! I grew up eating Indian food but it's not available where I live now, so this was a new thing for me to try but all the dishes turned out authentic. My question for Monica is....when are you bringing out your next book?
  5. vivin

    Burra Kabab

    My favorite mutton dish is Burra Kabab. Proabably because my dad used to like it so much. He is a red meat kind of guy. I do not have a good recipe for this though. And I would not even know which parts work best. Any ideas? Have a lot of people had this dish? Seems kind of scarce around here and scarcer still is a good rendition of this classic dish from north western province in Pakistan. Another related mutton dish is mutton roasted on hot stones (marble ??) that is, I think, native of the Sindh province. Lightly seasoned. Very very good. vivin.
  6. BBhasin

    Reds with Indian Cuisine

    While the fruity and flowery whites with their sweetness like the Gwerts, reislings, fume blancs, the chennins etc are much touted with spicy cuisine I would be very grateful to all the knowlegeble wine folks out there,who are also familiar with Indian cuisine, to steer me towards some reds that my guests might enjoy. Thank you
  7. Does anyone know of cookbooks that cover the cooking of the Indian diaspora? I'm researching some stories on Indian cookbooks, and I thought this would be an interesting angle. The few such cookbooks I've seen are fascinating - familiar Indian recipes, but with differences in ingredients and influences that reflect the histories of these communities. I guess many of these cookbooks are conscious attempts to commemorate these communities, so they all filled with anecdotes and nostalgia that make them really interesting, and often moving, reading. I know the classic South African Indian 'bible' - Zuleikha Mayat's 'Indian Delights'. I have some South African Indian relatives myself, the wives of my Gujarati cousins who now live in India, and make some interesting recipes which they tell me they brought with them from SA. For example, they take kandh - yam with a weirdly blue-purple coloured flesh - and cook it and slice it thinly and use these slices to sandwich a mixture of grated coconut and coriander leaves and some other spices. It looks bizarre: purple sandwiches with a white-green filling, but tastes great. I've just picked up another really interesting book: Recipes of the Jaffna Tamils, edited by Nesa Eliezer and printed by Orient Longman. Since Jaffna is just a strait's distance from Tamil Nadu one wouldn't expect the food to be that different, and much of it is standard Tamil stuff. But there are interesting variations, like a whole section on recipes using the products of the palmyra palm. Also, and I realise this might sound political, but its not meant to be, Tamil Brahmin cuisine and culture seems to have less of a hold in Sri Lanka as it does in India. So while the image of Tamil food in India is dominated by vegetarian Brahmin cooking (at least till the recent rise of 'Chettiar' cooking), the recipes in this book reflect the non-vegetarian cooking that is very much a part of Non-Brahmin Tamil life. A recipe for rasam flavoured with chicken bones for example sounds really surprising to someone used to the common vegetarian only version. Are there other such cookbooks for the desi communities in Trinidad, Mauritius, Fiji and where else? A friend who was coming from Guyana promised to get me a Guyanese-Indian cookbook, though unfortunately he cancelled his trip at the last minute. (But this link has some interesting recipes: http://guyana.gwebworks.com/recipes/recipe...pes_alpha.shtml ) Any names, comments, recipes, suggestions from people with experience of desi diasporic cooking would be welcome. Vikram
  8. Do you mostly make it at home? How many items would you have at any given meal made at home for your daily meal? Go out to restaurants? Any particular items you like to eat more often? If you own an Indian restaurant, can you share with us what your meal pattern is? If you are non-Indian, could you tell us how often you prepare an Indian meal or even inspired by India meal? Do you have or know kids that follow a similar pattern to yours in regards to Indian food? What Indian foods do these kids find most appealing to them? Have they grown up outside of India and eating Indian food?
  9. jackal10

    Asparagus with Indian spices

    Asparagus with Indian spices Serves 2 as Appetizer. This is an entry for Monica's competition. I have not tested it myself, asparagus not yet being in season here. 1 lb Fresh Asparagus 2 T Olive or groundnut oil 2 T FIncely shreded coconut 1 tsp salt 1 tsp Light curry powder of your favourite spice mixture 1. Prepare the asparagus: break off the tough part of the base of the sticks, and if fancy peel from below the bud area 2. Toss with the oil 3. Roast in a hot oven for 10 minutes 4. In a hot pan put the salt and the ground spices, heat until the aroma is released. 5. Mix in the grated coconut 6. Plate the asparagus and either strew the coconut mix over, or leave on the side of the plate, or put a soft poached egg on the plate, and top with the spice mixture ( RG983 )
  10. Simon Majumdar

    Can a dish become "Indian"

    As most people know, the Chicken Tikka Masala is a creation not of Indian Kitchens but of Indian chefs in Birmingham, England, trying to prepare a dish that was palatable to the tastes of UK punters. It is, at worst, oily and an extraordinary bright red colour. However, in a recent conversation with a chef at one of the top hotels in Delhi, I was told that the dish is now on just about every restaurant menu in India also. It has been refined, developed and made with natural local ingredients. His version is Chicken Tikka ( made with a wonderful sounding corriander and garlic past marinade and then tandoored ) with a rich butter, tomato and fenugreek leaf sauce. My question is this. Can a dish created by Indian chefs who are working in the Indian Diaspora and which is taken on by hose chefs still working in India, be called an Indian dish? S
  11. Hema's is great but the service (lack thereof) amd wait is really a drag-Have taken friends to Hema's, Viceroy, Ghandi and Tippen. Looking for another place for variety sake. Prefer nonvegetarian. Heard that Bhabi's on Oakley is really good. Anyone been? Thanks.
  12. Monica Bhide

    Indian Salads

    Hi all, we are having a huge dinner tomorrow night and I am stuck in a rut about what sort of salad to serve. The dinner menu has all sorts of fish, chicken and vegetarian recipes, all Indian. I normally do two salads, one with yogurt ( a raita of sorts) and one with onions (with vinegar and red food color )... I would like to do something different tomorrow night. Any suggestions? Maybe somehting with potatoe croutons and toasted sesame seeds Okay, I need to feed.. will be back in a few
  13. Hello, I’ve eaten food from British Indian restaurants and takeaways, and it has a special taste that isn’t found in American restaurant curries. Do you know what that is? Is there something in the base sauce that is special? Chicken broth? I’ve heard that oil is skimmed off the curries and added back to the base sauce? Is that true? Is monosodium glutamate added? If the oil in the pan catches on fire -- does that add that special flavor? Is the base sauce left out to ferment? Is there something else I haven’t thought of? Something complex -- something simple? A special herb or spice? I’d appreciate any thoughts you have, any clues. I’ve tried many cookbooks -- Kris Dhillon, Pat Chapman, and on and on. They are close, but not quite there. I want to recreate some of those great meals at home! Thanks, -Mary
  14. Suvir Saran

    Graduation Party Weekend

    Any ideas what one should expect at the Graduation weekend in an Indian household? Are there things Indian do differently from others in the US? Are there things that are similar? Does such an event even matter in an Indian household? Are their parties that happen? Guests that sleep over? Special foods that are cooked? What gifts does one take the family? What should one expect?
  15. Monica Bhide

    Buttermilk

    Tell me how you use it? Drink it? Add it to cooked rice? Cook with it?
  16. Have a duck in our freezer, that seems to call to me, "Eat me, Eat me"... Have googled "recipes indian duck"...About a bazillion hits on Bombay Duck, which of course, is fish... A couple recipes for "Duck Vindaloo"...While almost any of gods creatures would indeed be enhanced by preparation Vindaloo style, I can't seem to find much else. Is waterfowl not popular in India?, or am I just not looking in the right places?
  17. cubgirl

    DAHL

    I am new around here but would like a good recipe for Dahl, if someone could help me please. Thanks
  18. For Christmas, I'm planning on buying my father a decent selection of Indian spices. He loves to cook Indian, but his spices are stale, to say the least. What spices would be considered essentials? Also - are there any that are nice to have but not absolutely necessary?
  19. chromedome

    Identify this sweet?

    Several months ago I was in the little Punjabi store near my sister-in-law's house. In their shopping cart of clearance items I found several bags of pebbly-looking things covered in sesame seeds. Unfortunately for me the grandmother was working the counter that day, and all she could convey to me was that they were a sweet. They are about the size of a hazelnut; they are covered on the outside with sesame seeds; they have a firm but not hard consistency; they taste of cardamom. What are they? I'm sure I'll want to buy some more some day, and I'd like to know what to ask for.
  20. I read in the 'India Abroad', a few years ago, about National Curry Day being celebrated in the U.K. To mark the occasion an Indian restaurant prepared the world's largest vegetble curry. An Indian beer producer came up with a spiced up beer ( which was not very popular) they called it ' Madras in a glass'. Another company, not to be out done prepared a vindaloo using beer ( which sounds very interesting to me) and re-christned it Vindalager. Then on a recent visit to New Delhi ,I was confronted with huge banners and other advertising heralding ' National Samosa Week'. If you bought a pepsi from a participating eatery you would be treated to a free samosa. What is the forum's reaction to an International Curry Day ? The Day would be launched by the Indian PM in conjuction with an Indian celebrity Chef. It would be sponsered by Indian companies. There would be contests ranging from inovative origional reiepes with an Indian flavor to essay contests Why I Love Indian food. Prizes would range from complimentary airtickets to India, courtsy Air India to Gift certificates at local Indian restaurants. Suvir and Monica will conduct special gourmet tours to India, exploring regional cuisines. Indian restaurants worldwide will offer 'Buy one Get one Free' How was my dream??
  21. Nayantara Majumdar

    Laccha Paratha

    Hello everyone, Am quite new to this forum. Has anyone tried making laccha paratha successfullly? I do not seem to get the layers and it's so disappointing. I dust the surface with oil and flour before cutting a radius, folding it like a cone, flattening it and then rolling out. In the dough I add oil too. I am originally from Kolkata, where we get the most amazing layered parathas. Any suggestions???? Thanks Nayantara
  22. Hi, I want to cook a version of mushroom sukke that my sister-in-law makes. I need to use triphala for it. The only way I've seen it being used is in its whole form. They boil it in water and use the water to flavour the dish or use it in tadka. I want to know if I could roast it up and powder it - I have a limited stock, so can't afford to waste it on experimentation. That's also the reason I'd rather not use them whole and then discard them if I can help it. I know this has been discussed elsewhere and remember Episure mentioning roasting and grinding it. I wonder if the flavour is more potent when you grind it? Can you grind it finely to a powder? Will the ground spice lend a bitter taste to the dish or a produce a tingling sensation in the mouth, the kind you get when you suck on a szechuan peppercorn? And you're right Episure - this spice deserves more recognition than it gets. I absolutely love its aroma and the flavour it lends to the dish. Any advice greatly appreciated. Thanks, Suman
  23. Suvir Saran

    Lunch

    Where does one go to eat a good Indian meal at lunch time. What does one order? How does it affect the workday? Any different from the many other options one has?
  24. Suvir Saran

    Mirchi Kaa Saalan

    I ate Mirchi Kaa Saalan (chilies in a curry sauce) today. Do you know it? Make it? Is it made at a restaurant near you?
  25. Gul_Dekar

    Indian Milk Sweets

    Hi my friend mentioned that her relatives often go back to India and buy these Indian milk sweets which are diamond in shape and come in various flavours like pistachio and so on. I was wondering if anyone has any idea what they are called and if possible where I could find a recipe to make my own? Are they difficult to make? I live in Malaysia and apparently they don't sell them here so I was just really curious about them. Would REALLY REALLY be grateful for any help!
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