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Found 988 results

  1. using the following as the standard criteria: for regional chinese: grand sichuan on 9th bet 50/51st for thai: the original wondee siam on 9th bet 52/53rd & pam real on 49th nr 9th av which 1-2 indian restaurants should be listed?
  2. I recently went to Chowpatty in Iselin, NJ. The menu has a whole section of "Gujarati Vegetable," with no descriptions. Actually nothing on the menu has descriptions. I am wondering what the most common Gujarati dishes are so that I know what to order next time. I did some internet searches and am not able to translate any of the dishes, maybe it is how they spell them. Vegetables (Gujarati): Undhiya Tuvar Ringan Ringan Bataka Tindora Bataka Bhinda Auro Kaju Karela Parvar Na Raviya Kankola
  3. Reefpimp

    Currying favor

    Some of you may know that I work as a cook on a cruise ship. It's been an interesting job, made more so recently when I was transferred a month ago to the Special Orders crew and told that I would be making meals for our guests with special dietary requests. My biggest challenge came this week when we had a group of 30 passengers who were all Jain. My word, what a difficult challenge this was for me!! The dietary restrictions alone made getting any sort of flavor into their meals quite diffcult--strict vegetarian, no onions, no garlic, no ginger, no potatoes--nothing that grows beneath the ground. Add to that, that I'm not all that familiar with the food of the Subcontinent, and one has a ready recipe for disaster. Then I remembered eGullet!! And what a resource your little corner of the Internet has turned out to be. I bought a couple of cookbooks (Lord Krishna's Cuisine; The Dance of Spices) but mostly I just opened this page and worked my way through posts in this sub-forum with a notebook handy and every day have been able to put together a multi-course meal complete with raitas and pickles. My crowning achievment came yesterday when two tables sent back for second helpings of my pumpkin "Rogan Josh"-style main course. Waitstaff have been asked what part of India I am from ("The part that's in Minnesota," quipped one waitress.)--who would have thought?!? I couldn't have done it without you good people. Thank you very much.
  4. Welcome Monika, Are you from a Marwari family? What is the Indian grocery situation like in Finland-are you able to get all the essentials or is it difficult to find things, like....besan for instance?
  5. So I just acquired Lord Krishna's Cuisine and, while it's pretty neat and has an amazing collection of sweets, it also doesn't use onions and garlic. Instead it tends to use asafoetida, which makes me feel pretty sick when I smell it, so I want to rehabilitate those recipes, and re-substitute onion and garlic for it. Anyone have any ideas about that?
  6. Simon Majumdar

    Where's the Heart

    As vegetarian food in India is so wonderful, the place of meat often gets forgotten. In fact people assume you are a vegatarian unless you say that you are "non-veg" This often covers up the wonderful meat dishes that you can find in so many regions. One thing i have not been able to track down with any great success is a use of offal I love offal in all its forms. I think it is disengenuous to kill an animal and not try and eat all of it. I love the kidneys, the spleen, the hearts etc but my own cuisine seems lacking. Am I missing something? I have had a wonderful brain curry in Delhi, but that was it. Where in india do they specialise in offal and how do they prepare it. Any clues? S
  7. Suvir Saran

    Matar Paneer ( Indian Cheese )

    Matar Paneer ( Indian Cheese ) 10 c whole milk 1/2 c buttermilk / yogurt (more maybe needed, so keep some extra In a large heavy bottomed pan, bring the milk to a boil over medium heat. Stir often to ensure that the milk is not sticking to the bottom of the pan. When milk starts to boil, lower heat and add the buttermilk and stir until the milk starts to separate into curds. Remove from heat as soon as this happens. You can even add a few ice cubes to the curd-whey mix. The heat will make the protein tougher. Hence the need to expose the cheese to as little heat as possible. If the curds are not forming, add a little more buttermilk and cook for a couple of minutes more. And do the above as soon as the curds form. Pour the curds-whey mix into a collander lined with several layers of cheese cloth or even a layer of muslin, draining onto a dish that will collect the whey. Collect the sides of the cheesecloth or muslin and tie them up together and twist gently to help drain the whey from the curds. Place the bundled curds on a tray and press this bundle with a heavy pan/container or obejct. Make sure this heavy weight covers the bundle fully. To make cheese for dessert recipes or for koftas or even a bhujia, weight it down for no more than a half hour. For recipes where cheese cubes are used, weight the bundle down for an hour or more. This will make the cheese form a firm mass that can be cut into neat cubes. Note: I use buttermilk as it makes for cheese that has very little sour flavor. People use lemon or vinegar, these curdle the milk quickly but leave a strong aftertaste. This aftertaste is not nice when making desserts with cheese. Try and use the cheese the same day as you make it. The more time it is kept the dryer it becomes and the harder it will be. When making soft cheese for desserts. Weight it down for a shorter time as I write above. You can leave more moisture in, if you know you will not use it till the next day. The cheese will get dryer in refrigeration. For the firm cheese, you can make the firm cube and store it overnight in chilled water. But you cannot put the cheese in water until a firm cake, with all the whey drained is formed. So, first make your cheese cube, and if you are not using it the same day, immerse it in a container of water, seal with a cover and cut only when ready to use into smaller cubes. Keywords: Side, Indian ( RG886 )
  8. Suvir Saran

    Regional Cooking

    Kashmiri Cuisine Kashmir is in the north west of India. It is mantled in the venerated Himalayas. When Indians think of beauty, Kashmir is one of the first thoughts. The food in Kashmir is a mixture of Indian, Iranian & middle eastern styles. This fusion gave rise to the traditional "Wazawan" style of cooking which is cooked in a lot of spices. The aroma that arises from the food is highly sensuous and very woody and symbolizes the true essence of Kashmir. The population comprises mainly of Moslems or "Brahmins" or "Kashmiri pundits" who also eat meats but surprisingly do not include onions & garlic in their food. Yogurt is an essential ingredient, used extensively in Kashmiri food. Saffron from Kashmir is a scarce commodity but a prized spice. The descendants of cooks from Samarkhand, the Wazas, are the master chefs of Kashmir. Their ancestors came to India with Timur in the 15th century. The ultimate formal banquet in Kashmir is the royal Wazawan. Composed of thirty-six courses, easily fifteen and thirty can be preparations of meat, cooked overnight by the master chef, Vasta Waza, and his assistants. Communal eating is a tradition and upto 4 people share food from one plate called the Trami. Meal begin with a ritual washing of hands in basins called Tash-t-Nari. Then the Tramis arrive, heaped with rice,and laced with the many courses that follow. Condiments (Chutneys and Yogurt) are served separately in earthenware. New Tramis keep coming with new dishes as the meal progresses. To Kashmiri Pundits, eating is a sacred tradition. Some dishes are a must in most any dinner. Rogan Josh, Gushtaaba, Aab Gosht and Rista are a few of them. Most all meals end with Gushtaaba.
  9. Monica Bhide

    Indian Salads

    Hi all, we are having a huge dinner tomorrow night and I am stuck in a rut about what sort of salad to serve. The dinner menu has all sorts of fish, chicken and vegetarian recipes, all Indian. I normally do two salads, one with yogurt ( a raita of sorts) and one with onions (with vinegar and red food color )... I would like to do something different tomorrow night. Any suggestions? Maybe somehting with potatoe croutons and toasted sesame seeds Okay, I need to feed.. will be back in a few
  10. mongo_jones

    indian rums

    forgive me if this has been discussed before. rum is huge in india, especially with people in the armed forces (as we call the military). perhaps the biggest indian favorite: old monk
  11. Numerous have been the occasions when our patrons have explained their absence during the summer months with ,' its too hot for Indian food'. What do you think ? I have some views on this but would like to hear from all you wonderful people out there. Thanks
  12. Suvir Saran

    Indian Food

    How does the fact that Indian cooking in homes is largely vegetarian affect the restaurants serving Indian food? What effect does it have on the sales in a restaurant? Do people go to them primarily to eat meats and sate their cravings thereof? Any thoughts?
  13. helen jackson

    raita

    I have been asked by a company to come up with some yoghurt based dips that once sealed and refrigerated can have a 2 week shelf life. I immediately thought of raita. Does anyone have any interesting twists on raita that I could try out? thanks Helen
  14. I'd posted this question in an earlier discussion, but it got buried somewhere, so here it is again: What unusual things do you bring back from India? I've brought varak, copper vessels, the traditional butter-churner (mathani, even though I don't use it - mainly for decoration purposes), dried rose petals, bamboo shoots in brine, raw mangoes in brine.... Still on my list/wish list: Hyderabad ka potli masala, brass vessels, the black claypot my grandma used to make her famous fish curry in, surahi (a bit far-fetched I know), bharanis. Suman
  15. rajsuman

    Dals

    I was reading Italian Food by Elizabeth David when I came across a recipe where you first fry onions in oil, then add the lentils, fry some more, add water and cook until the lentils are done. That made me wonder if such a practice exists in Indian cooking. Does it? Any advantages of doing this? Suman
  16. Just wanted to let you all know about Angeethi it's across from Tortilla Factory and We went there today for lunch and they had shrimp, goat, chicken 4 ways, chaat bar (always) tons of free lassi and other drinks, rice pudding and gulab jamun desserts, rice 2 ways and 3 types of breads all for under $30. w/tip for 2! It was a fine way to break a diet IMHO! Happy holidays to y'all and you really need to get over here especially on a Saturday they have made-to-order omelets and other goodies too
  17. I drive through Newark Avenue often and notice all of the Indian restaurants and stores. I have not gone to any of them in years, and need some help. Are there any standouts? Thanks, Joana
  18. Monica Bhide

    Janamashtmi is coming

    The heartwarming festival of Janamashtmi is around the corner. This festival celebrates the birth of Lord Krishna. I am planning a prayer service at home and would like to follow it with a meal. What would you all suggest? What is typical..? I hope our newest member who cooked at the ISCKON temple will help me out here.
  19. Haggis

    Sweet Potatoes

    Appropriate to the season, I am wondering how Indians prepare sweet potatoes and yams. This year I have been assigned to bring a sweet potato/yam dish to the Thanksgiving potluck that I will be attending on the day after Thanksgiving, and I thought I'd not make the usual candied dish with marshmallows, and make something with exotic spices. If no other suggestions appear, I will probably make mashed sweet potatoes with butter, yoghurt, ginger, green chiles, garam masala, cardamom, and cinnamon. I'll throw some thinly sliced crisp caramelized onion on top for flavor as much as garnish. Anyone have any tips on how to enhance or improve the above? Better still, what are some genuine recipes that Indians use to prepare sweet potatoes?
  20. Last night I visited Udupi Village in Montclair, being a decent expert on South Indian cuisine (I am originally from there), I can whole-heartedly say that the food is very good. I usually have only one place of reference (Jackson Diner, Queens, NY). I know the place is not called that anymore. Madras Mahal (NYC, NY) is also another place serves a decent dosa! The decor in the place was bright but not unpleasing. We ordered the Mysore Masala Dosa (excellent), Vegetable Uttapum (very good), Iddli (very moist, almost perfect). I must mention the Mango Lassi. It was excellent - the lassi in most places have a tartness from that cuts into the flavor, not so with this one, I guess they add more mango pulp, which makes it sweeter but again very good. I find that the place was not very crowed, either people in the area are not familiar with South Indian or they dont know about the place. I would suggest anyone looking for something different in Indian dining, try out this place. Also, this is not affiliated with the Udupi in Iselin.
  21. Monica Bhide

    Recipe Contest

    Best Asparagus recipe, Indian style. Inspired by all the discussion on asparagus in the India forum recently , I have decided to hold a fun contest. You will have three days to complete the contest. Only the recipes posted on the recipeGullet will be judged. Our very own eGulleter's Rajsuman and Tryska will be the judges. The winner will receive a copy of one of my favorite new books – The Potsticker Chronicles. The rules – 1. You will need to use asparagus as one of the main ingredients 2. Please post tested recipes. IF you can provide a picture even better 3. You will need to use spices listed here… using any of the Indian pantry items listed here -- Indian Pantry 4. Anyone in an “official” capacity at eGullet is eligible to enter but will not receive any prizes. Judgments 1. All judgments are final 2. Contest ends on April 15th 3. The winner will be announced on April 20th Please post your entries on this thread along with a link to recipeGullet. (Note – We may need an alternate judge if Rajsuman is unable to find asparagus!)
  22. Well, it is supposed to snow this weekend keeping people here indoors Suggestions for slow cooked recipes from your grandmothers kitchen. We are doing a dal makhani - generally I let this simmer for about 8 hours - mostly unattended and its worth it. What are you cooking up?
  23. Dianabanana

    Khichdee + rice cooker = ?

    Okay I'm about to make some khichdee, which is basically a porridge of moong dal and rice. Can I do this in the rice cooker on the congee setting? Will the moong dal clog it up and make a horrific mess? I rather suspect the answer is yes but am tempted to try it anyway.
  24. wgallois

    Special juices

    Has there ever been a discussion of Indian juice bars on the board? I have a question relating to so-called 'special juices' which are sometimes on offer in such places. In Indian-run juice bars in the Emirates these often have great names, but there is often no clue as to what kind of fruit cocktail they consist of, and I am curious as to whether there exists a set of names that Indians across the world would recognise. I know that a 'Lexus' consists of mango and avocado juice with ice cream, but what about a 'Disco', a 'Titanic', a 'www', a 'Valentine Day' or a 'Computer'? I would guess that mixes such as 'Mumtaz' and 'Wastha' are specific to this part of the world, but perhaps I am wrong? I have a lot of affection for such juice bars as I think they provide drinks which are both tasty and nutritious.
  25. So due to a variety of factors I have decided to cook Indian for the next 3 months. Pursuant to that I purchased the other day a coffee grinder for spice-related grinding. Today and tomorrow I will be stocking the pantry with whatever other hardware and software is necessary. So I'm interested in hearing what are the staples of the Indian pantry. wet ingredients, dry ingredients, canned stuff, whatnot. So far on the list: Spices peppercorns fenugreek cumin kalonji cloves cinnamon Other dry: basmati rice chick peas wet onion garlic ginger I know I can gather a list like this by making a bunch of indian dishes and seeing what spices they need, but I'm looking to get a ready to go pantry so that when I get ready to cook I already have some of the shopping done. Many thanks, Ben
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