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  1. Anyone picked up a copy yet? I've never been to the steakhouse--altho' flipping through the book, that's something I must correct when I head to the UK in '012--but this is a nice book. Obviously beef centric, altho' there are also recipes for other beasts--chicken, lamb, veal, goose, pork and shellfish. What's nice is that for a meat-centred book, the steak and burger recipes are less recipes and more detailed breakdowns of the technique. Indeed, the book as a whole has a lot of recipes (for cocktails as well as savoury dishes and puddings) but there's also a lot of room given to relevant tec
  2. I have just bought 4oz of fresh Perigord Truffles and have a question about whether the truffles should be warmed to release their maximum flavour or simply shaved ontop of the dish. Two weeks ago I got ahold of a Burgundy Fall truffle and was struck by the fact that when we shaved it ontop of an omelet the flavour was not nearly as strong as when we made another omelet and rolled the shaved truffles inside. With the Perigord Truffles I plan to use them to make truffled mashed potatoes. I had planned on shaving them over the individual servings at the table but now I am wondering if it would
  3. We've been eagerly anticipating the arrival of Modernist Cuisine at Home since it was announced... copies started arriving today, so it's time to start cooking. My mom's in town for the weekend and wants to try the Apple Cream Pie: it's pretty straightforward, but I do have a question about the Granny Smith apple juice. Lacking a juicer, I have to make the juice the hard way; should I be doing this cold, or can I use one of the juicing techniques that heats the apples?
  4. [Moderator note: The original Cooking with "Modernist Cuisine" topic became too large for our servers to handle efficiently, so we've divided it up; the preceding part of this discussion is here: Cooking with "Modernist Cuisine" (Part 3)] Well, I was in the "didnt know" camp as I have sadly not cooked as many recipes as I would have liked from the book. After reading your post and seeing your pics I decided to give it a whirl and was definitely not disappointed, it was as good as any BBQ Ive ever had (and I live in central texas now, we have pretty good bbq here) Embarrassingly I think the
  5. Hi, I ordered this book and its companion: The Advanced Professional Pastry Chef, both by Bo Friberg, and was wondering if anyone has experience with the books? I've bought them because I wanted to gain a better understanding and more comprehensive knowledge about pastry (especially the dessert side) and thought that this would be a good starting point. Please share your thoughts about the books and any advice on desserts! With kind regards, Koen
  6. I am looking for cookbooks that feature recipes and cuisine from the Northern region of Italy. ( My ancestors originate from Torino. ) I am looking for 'light' or healthier versions of traditional northern Italian recipes. Any recommendations?
  7. Do people own/have any good recommendations for cookbooks which have been self-published (or at least from small independent publishers)? Not that I think that there is anything inherently better about indie/self-publishing, but knowing people who have self-published (but not cookbooks) I know the problems of promotion and getting your work out there. So I though having such a wide ranging and knowledgeable community as eGullet (sycophantic I know!) collect and recommend some independent cookbooks would be useful for everyone!
  8. Janice Wong is the chef and owner of 2am Dessert Bar in Singapore, one of the few dessert restaurants in the world. This is her first book, and involves on her plated desserts. Visually it's great, the packaging and photos are stunning. I haven't tried any recipes, but after reading some they seem consistent. My main complaint is that this book has few dishes (about 30), it has about 120 pages, and a good amount are occupied by full 2 pages photos. So overall this book is on the pricey side (about 55 US$ plus shipping), but I'm happy to have bought it. As far as I know you can buy it only thro
  9. I just stumbled upon Coco at Chapters yesterday and couldn't resist picking it up. The premise is that 10 of the world's most famous chefs (Ferran Adrià, Alain Ducasse, Alice Waters, René Redzepi, Jacky Yu, Yoshihiro Murata, Fergus Henderson, Shannon Bennett, Mario Batali, and Gordon Ramsay) each select 10 chefs who they think are making important contributions to modern gastronomy. For each of the resulting 100 chefs, there is a short blurb by the "Master" who chose them about what aspect of their cooking is exciting, a brief bio, pictures, and a sample menu + recipes. The final result is a
  10. Not only would I buy an egullet cookbook, I would contribute to it being made!! Did anyone ever think of having our own egullet cookbook? Maybe a ring folder type that can be added to on a yearly basis...I wish there was such a one.
  11. With all the new cookbooks I'm sure we've received for the holidays, has anyone started throwing out/giving away/selling their books to make room? What criteria do you have for keeping or throwing away your books? I'm already beginning to look in askance at some books that were gifts, and I only have one small shelf of cookbooks. It seems obvious that you'd get rid of books you never use, but has anyone ever thrown away a copy because they've used it too much?
  12. I returned a couple of cookery books to my local library and was thrilled to bits to find "Yes Chef" on the shelves. Its contains "100 Great British Recipes from 20 Great British Chefs", including, Marcus Waring, Jason Atherton, Michael Caines, Nathan Outlaw, Glynn Purnell, Mark Hix, Anthony Demetre, Tom Kitchin, etc,etc,etc. Most of the chefs are Michelin starred and I just can't wait to tackle some of the recipes. I deem myself to be fortunate enough to have dined at quite a few of their restaurants so its a real pleasure to recreate the style of cooking. A lot of them seem to be signature d
  13. The Country Cooking of Ireland was named Cookbook of the Year by The James Beard Foundation. I have not heard of this book and have found no mention of it on this site. I was wondering who has it and your thoughts about it. Dan
  14. I would like to begin Vietnamese cooking- I would like titles of good cookbooks, etc.
  15. Pardon me if there's already a thread, but I haven't seen one in all my searching and I'm really interested in this book. I happened to pick it up at the library on Saturday and I've been looking through it with various feelings since. I think most of it is wonder. I've never seen anything I'd rather eat more of than what's in this book. There are some particular selections which look especially incredible right now: The acorn squash sformato; the sweet pea flan; the goat cheese truffles; the asparagus vinaigrette; the duck liver ravioli; the pumpkin lune; the spaghetti with sweet 100 tomatoes
  16. Well here I am stuck at home with a virus, not to mention snow and getting ready for company Thursday night and Super Bowl prep. My dad's birthday is Friday and I can't get out to look for something. I was thinking a really nice grilling book. He grills a lot and has both a gas grill and an Egg and he's pretty good. So nothing too basic. BUT he's not the most adventuresome eater, so nothing too exotic, either. Can anyone recommend something that I could order and have sent? Thanks so much!
  17. Hi folks, i was looking to get my wife a couple of pastry books for her birthday and have my eye on the following pair: The Fundamental Techniques of Classic Pastry Arts and Paris Patisseries: History, Shops, Recipes (English not out till Feb 2010 but the French very recently published) Does anyone have these books and what do you think of them? She says she's a beginner and she's been getting into baking cupcakes and cookies recently but is looking to take it to the next level. Of course I would benefit greatly too from her growing interest and am very eager to be her official taster. Any
  18. What do you guys do when you buy a new book? Read through for ideas? Make one or two recipes? Cook your way through it (in any meaning of the phrase)? Just to add to the discussion, I have... ten, including a gem from the feminist '70s called "The Political Palate".
  19. So I figured I'd 'fess up. I tend to get an inspired to buy cookbooks from different sources. Sometimes amazon, sometimes people's reccomendation, and yes the egullet forums. Recently two times I purchased a cookbook that I already had. (of course I do have several hundred). So I was wondering if I"m the only one, or has this happened to anyone else?
  20. I'd like a copy of Apicius. I'd like an English translation and I'd prefer--really prefer--it to have no substitutes for ingredients. Or, if it does include substitutes, to also mention what the original ingredient was. I've looked at a couple of online versions and found it doesn't tell you what the original item was. What's the best and most reliable hardcopy translation?
  21. So, I've got a boatload of cookbooks. Some I cook from, some I cook with, some I read, some I don't. What cookbooks do you have that you won't be using as recipe guides, but that you like to read and/or look at the pictures? I'll start with a newer addition to my collection: NOMA Time and Place in Nordic Cuisine. It's a stunning book, but I think I might have trouble finding many of the ingredients being used.
  22. Some context to get us started. We have Society member Nathan Myhrvold's epic Modernist Cuisine, which may well change the terrain of cooking as we know it. It's being self-published and costs more than a flight to Paris. (Mine's on order.) We have Society member Dorie Greenspan's Around My French Table. The genius behind several baking books reports that she still can't use weight in her recipes, just US volume. Four of the Amazon top ten cookbooks are diet books, one is about something called "cake pops," and Rocco DiSpirito sits in the top spot telling us to Now Eat This -- "this" being
  23. Good Meat by Deborah Krasner caught my eye this morning and so I looked thru it. It looks great and has my interest but before I shell out $40, I thought I'd see if anybody has an opinion.
  24. Hello all- Is anyone aware of an online nutrition calculator that home cooks can use? I would like to enter all of my ingredients and get the nutrition information for the dish I am cooking. More importantly, I would like to be able to play with the amounts of ingredients in order to serve a healthier dish. For example, cutting the butter in 1/2 for sauteing onions may make a minimal change in taste, but a substantial change in calories. It could mean the difference between someone being able to have a serving of something they really miss or not. Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
  25. Raw Tuscan Kale Salad with Chiles and Pecorino p.63 I found myself a few minutes from the Farmer's Market that was sure to have Tuscan Kale so I decided to take the plunge. The kale ($1.50) was lovely. The recipe calls for the dressing to be made separately in a bowl but I made it directly in the large bowl I was going to toss the kale in so as not to lose any bits and to even further simplify things. I did not have pecorino so I did sub a nutty asiago. After letting it rest the requisite initial 5 minutes I sampled directly from the bowl. Verdict: really good - I could have put a serious de
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