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  1. I used my homemade toffee in a cookie recipe hoping that the toffee will add a crunch to the cookie... it didn't turn out well as the toffee melted and didn't keep its hardened crunch form. How can I prevent my toffee from melting in my cookie recipe?
  2. Any idea what is the best book for me? I am starting to love cooking, I just got great recipe of sauces from this book "Restaurant Style Barbecue Sauce Recipes" all I need is the proper technique for grilling. Thanks
  3. we're all used to the Wednesday/Sunday food sections of newspapers far and wide, national and local. I see corrections in the local or regional columns when called for, but there's never a way to critique the ones published on a national scale because the content is behind a paywall. I get the WSJ, but don't want to pay additional (I should get access to it all on line for free-the newspaper is not cheap) for their online edition. Very frustrating to try a recipe and have major problems with it and not be able to point out some serious issues. Specifically, the WSJ published a recipe from Dee Retalli, a pastry chef in London who's recipe is in the cookbook 'Rustic' by Jorge Fernandez and Rich Wells. I have made this cake 3 times. First time was a total runover disaster, which I should have foreseen. This cakes calls for a 10" springform or if you don't have that, a 10" cast iron skillet. I went for the latter because that is what I had. Almond mixtures tend to really smoke when they run over, just so you know. Tried again later with a deeper than normal 9 " springform. Happened again. Think it has to do with the 2 teaspoons of baking powder and quick activation in a 350º oven. Invested in a 10" springform for '3rd times a charm' try. I was successful, but not because I followed the directions, rather I became a little obsessed with making this work. Checked my oven, followed with the recipe and eyed it warily. It came up to the brim...and stayed. 45 minutes later it was supposed to be done but while it was beautiful, it was a bowl of jello in the center. It was also browning at an alarming rate- the almond flour again? So I placed a sheet of tinfoil over it (beautiful top crust) and turned the oven down to 325º and carefully watched and tested for almost another hour. That's a big time difference. I found the recipe on cooked.com - credited to the above authors and cookbook albeit in Euro style measures and temps. All seems the same, so what are the odds that the recipe was misprinted twice from 2 different media? All I can think of is somewhere down the line (in the cookbook itself?) the cook time and temp were off. The time on both reads 45 min. The recipe took at least 1hr and 45 minutes. methinks someone left out the hour... The temp. thing is a little more obvious. Celcius to farenheight 350ºF does not equal 180ºC, more like 176ºC. Over almost 2 hours, I think that could make the difference between cooked and burnt? Sooo, I turned it down when I saw how fast it was browning to 325. The cake stays in form while you pour the honey over it, then orange water, then 2(!!!) cups of sliced toasted almonds. I put 1 cup and there is no way another cup would have stayed on that cake. I cup settled up to almost an inch on a 10" cake... Has anyone else tried this recipe or have the cookbook? It's a wonderful cake if you correct the time and temp., But I'd be really curious to see if anyone followed it exactly as written with success?
  4. With Modernist Cuisine I waited a couple of years and ended up with a copy from the 6th printing run the advantage of this was that all errors picked up in the erratta had been corrected in the print copy. I am looking to get modernist bread soon and wondered if someone had purchased it recently to check or if someone knew of hand if they have printed any additional corrected runs
  5. I dont believe that any English translation of Carêmes works exist. An incomplete version was published in 1842 (I think) but even the that version seems lackluster for the few recipes it does cover. I think it's time the world looks to its past, but I don't speak great French and it's a huge task to undertake. I hopefully plan on publishing this work and anyone who helps me will get a very fair cut, and if we decide not to publish it, I'll put it out on the internet for free. I'm working in Google docs so we can collaborate. I'm first cataloging the index to cross reference the pre-existing incomplete English version to give us a reference of what yet needs to be done, and from there we will go down the list of recipies and Translate them one by one. Simple google translate goes only so far, as it is 1700s French culinary terms and phrases being used. I'd like to preserve as much of Carêmes beautiful and flowery language as possible. Who's with me?
  6. Good day eG peoples! I am going to purchase a copy of Larousse Gastronomique (English, because I cannot speak French as well as most French toddlers), and I am wondering which version you think is better and why? Let your opinions fly freely...hold nothing back!
  7. I have seen referenced in several places on the internet, including Wikipedia, a stat about escoffier recommending 40 minutes for scrambled eggs in a Bain Marie. I cant find where this number is from. On Wikipedia it refers to the book I currently own, the "Escoffier le guide culinaire" with forward by Heston Blumenthal by h. L. Cracknell...specificly page 157 for the 40 minute cooking time of scrambled eggs but it's not in my book on that page! Even tho there is the recipe for scrambled eggs on that page... I've seen the 1903 first edition online.. And it's not in there either.... Where is this number from?? Id like to know in case there is some even more complete book or something out there that I'm missing. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you.
  8. Solid intermediate cook, here. Not especially intimidated by elaborate preps. But I'm new to SV, and would like a recommendation for a cookbook for guidance and exploration. I was thinking of Tom Keller's Under Pressure, but I'm wondering if the preps he includes may not be the most generally useful. What do you all like, and why? Thanks!
  9. I need a book on the application of rotavapor machine. I've searched something on web but i can't find something strictly professional for the kitchen please help me. To improve the research.
  10. Can anyone suggest me some good books related to Gastronomy, food history, culture, recipes based on different cultures. Also recommend the best food magazine subscriptions.
  11. Thanks to @blue_dolphin, I was forced to buy this cookbook and it was delivered today. No matter how hard I try, I just don't super enjoy cookbooks on my Kindle. Anyway, I'll most likely be alone on this thread due to low okra likability lol, but I'm an only child and I'm used to being alone 😁 First on the list will be the Kimchi Okra from page 100--as suggested by @blue_dolphin. I'll be back on this thread soon
  12. Has anyone come across a digital version of Practical Professional Cookery (revised 3rd edition) H.L. Cracknell & R.J. Kaufmann. I am using this as the textbook for my culinary arts students and a digital version would come in very handy for creating notes and handouts.
  13. After batting about .500 with my previous approach to macarons, I came across Pierre Herme's base recipe online. After two flawless batches of macarons, I've been re-energized to continue to work at mastering them. Specifically, I want to try more of his recipes. My conundrum is that he has, as far as I can tell, two macaron cookbooks and I don't know which one I should get. I can't tell if one is just an updated version of the other or a reissue or what the differences really are. I was hoping somebody had some insight. I have searched online and haven't seen both books referenced in the same context or contrasted at all. This one appears to be older. And this one appears to be the newer of the two. Any insight would be helpful. Thanks,
  14. Update!! --- the sale is still going on at Amazon as of Sunday (11/24) at 11:15am EST ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Did anyone note the sale price on Modernist Cuisine today (maybe yesterday)? Amazon and Target dropped the set of tomes to $379!!! This price looks like it will change after today...so get it ASAP!!! https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/0982761007?pf_rd_p=183f5289-9dc0-416f-942e-e8f213ef368b&pf_rd_r=SRFCHFB5EFTGAA8AZHJX -or- https://www.target.com/p/modernist-cuisine-by-nathan-myhrvold-chris-young-maxime-bilet-hardcover/-/A-77279948
  15. "You cannot run away from weakness; you must some time fight it out or perish; and if that be so, why not now, and where you stand?" Maybe a bit dramatic, but I've been thinking critically, lately, about my development as a cook. I'll note here an amateur, though enthusiastic, cook. I've come to the conclusion that my weakness now is a lack of creativity with respect to vegetables, both as sides and mains. And sides generally. I've become so immersed in cooking the perfect, moist, flavourful chicken breast; mastering a med-rare rib eye, or cedar smoking a fillet of salmon so it's flakey but not overcooked; etc.--not to mention my latest experiments with cooking sous vide--that vegetables/sides have become kind of an afterthought. Carelessly steamed or sautéed and tossed on the plate next to the "true prize". I know there's lots to learn. Any recommendations for books/resources that might help me both with ideas and technique for improving this area? Thanks!
  16. There doesn't seem to be anything in the threads about spice cookbooks. I just bought The Book of Spices by Frederic Rosengarten, Jr. Copyright 1969. (He has a nut book, too, different thread.) Fabulous illustrations. I also have McCormick's Spices of the World Cookbook and The Spice Cookbook by Avanelle Day and Lillie Stuckey. Anyone have opinions or recommendations?
  17. I have finally ordered a pressure cooker and would like to get some recommendations for a couple of recipe books. Does anyone have any suggestions for which ones to get? Thanks!
  18. Hey everyone. I've been thinking of picking up a couple of Japanese and Korean cookbooks but have no idea whats out there. I picked up "Every Grain of Rice" this year and cook from it at least once a week (and have done so since it was released!). I love her style and I love the ease of the recipes (although I definitely could manage more complexity). I'm planning on picking up her other books but am after some advice on Japanese cookbooks. Specifically I was looking at 'Japanese Farm Food' by Nancy Singleton Hachisu. Does anyone have any comment on this book? It looks good! As for any other Japanese and Korean cookbooks (I have Momofuku by the way and love it, if you could call the Korean) I'd be interested in something recent, well produced and a book that is also interesting to read. Thanks in advance.
  19. It must be the pre holiday cookbook release season as the new ones seem to be popping out. I have been quite interested in the food of the region and Jerusalem by Ottolenghi and Tamimi is calling . Has anyone seen a pre-release copy or ordered it?
  20. I just read a positive review of Burma - Rivers of Flavor in LA Weekly. I am a fan of her other books and am considering this one. Has anyone else purchased or have opinions?
  21. [Moderator note: The original Cooking with "Modernist Cuisine" topic became too large for our servers to handle efficiently, so we've divided it up; the preceding part of this discussion is here: Cooking with "Modernist Cuisine" (Part 3)] Well, I was in the "didnt know" camp as I have sadly not cooked as many recipes as I would have liked from the book. After reading your post and seeing your pics I decided to give it a whirl and was definitely not disappointed, it was as good as any BBQ Ive ever had (and I live in central texas now, we have pretty good bbq here) Embarrassingly I think the only things Ive really cooked from the book are the mac and cheese, the carrot soup, the pastrami, and now the bbq ribs. Any other insanely popular recipes that I have missed and need to make since I have a few days off?
  22. Has anyone seen this book? I've sort of been eyeballing it the last few weeks, and just saw today that its apparently not on pre-order anymore, but available to ship from Amazon. Looks like a nice CIA text on dessert, heres the table of contents: Ch1 The Basic Elements 1 Ch2 Pre-Desserts 105 Ch3 Plated Desserts 163 Ch4 Dessert Buffets 261 Ch5 Passed-Around Desserts 331 Ch6 Cakes (Entremets) 381 Ch7 Petits Fours (Mignardises) 449 Anyone have thoughts on this one? I'm tempted, but dont really know much about it. LINK
  23. We've been eagerly anticipating the arrival of Modernist Cuisine at Home since it was announced... copies started arriving today, so it's time to start cooking. My mom's in town for the weekend and wants to try the Apple Cream Pie: it's pretty straightforward, but I do have a question about the Granny Smith apple juice. Lacking a juicer, I have to make the juice the hard way; should I be doing this cold, or can I use one of the juicing techniques that heats the apples?
  24. Hi, I ordered this book and its companion: The Advanced Professional Pastry Chef, both by Bo Friberg, and was wondering if anyone has experience with the books? I've bought them because I wanted to gain a better understanding and more comprehensive knowledge about pastry (especially the dessert side) and thought that this would be a good starting point. Please share your thoughts about the books and any advice on desserts! With kind regards, Koen
  25. I was checking out Amazon and I discovered Peter Greweling has a new book coming out. Well, not really a totally new book but a new edition of Chocolates & Confections. http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/0470424419 I have his first two books and I have used them with great success. The first book was a great reference book for my Food Chemistry course last year, actually it was a whole lot more informative than the text I had to buy for the course. I am having a hard time deciding if I want to put the money down and pre-order this book too. Decisions Decisions. I think I am leaning towards getting it anyway. His books have been great so far. Anyone got an opinion on picking this book up if you have the other two?
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