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  1. Has anyone else picked up a copy of Lesley Téllez's new cookbook, Eat Mexico? I've long wanted to take a culinary tour of Mexico City, but I still haven't made it down there; this book is doing nothing to calm that desire! There are quite a few ingredients in it that I am going to have a hard time getting my hands on, but I thought I'd give some of the recipes a try anyway. Is anyone else cooking from it yet?
  2. I am attempting a recipe from Peter Greweling's book "Chocolates & Confections." It's the Salt & Pepper Bars. In the recipe you first lay down a layer of salted caramel in your frame, then spray with cocoa butter before laying down the second layer. I don't have an airbrush or any equipment really. Can anyone shed light onto how this is done - I've searched the book and online, but haven't found any sources to help. I get that it's supposed to help with moisture retention, but am not sure how to "spray with cocoa butter." Thanks for any tips!
  3. The team over at Modernist Cuisine announced today that their next project will be an in-depth exploration of bread. I personally am very excited about this, I had been hoping their next project would be in the baking and pastry realm. Additionally, Francisco Migoya will be head chef and Peter Reinhart will assignments editor for this project which is expected to be a multi-volume affair.
  4. I'm wondering what you recommend as the best books about France chocolate cakes or great chocolate? Thank
  5. In the near future, a friend and I would like to do a Mexican themed dinner party. Any tips for internationally available Mexican cookbooks? I'd like something as "authentic" as possible (whatever that may mean ;-) – I should be able to get various dried chiles and other ingredients at the two Mexican supermarkets here in Vienna. Is Authentic Mexican (20th Anniversary Ed) by Rick Bayless any good? His name does crop here quite often, but judgements regarding authenticity seem to be mixed ...
  6. Good day eG peoples! I am going to purchase a copy of Larousse Gastronomique (English, because I cannot speak French as well as most French toddlers), and I am wondering which version you think is better and why? Let your opinions fly freely...hold nothing back!
  7. I have been searching and searching for Jean-Pierre Wybauw's book: Chocolates 2: Ganache: Great Ganache Experience. I can't find a copy anywhere. Does anyone know if it is even still in print? I believe it was only published in 2010. It is (to my understanding) one of the definitive books of ganache formulation and recipe creation. I have his 4th book ,but this one eludes me. Any thoughts on where I might find a copy? My local library doesn't have it and brick and morter book stores are few and far between these days.
  8. I'm making the citron cream recipe in Migoya's Elements of Desserts (p318/9?). It says to cook the anglaise to 85 degrees, place on an ice bath then whip the anglaise. I've done that but it doesn't seem to whip (let alone to a medium peak). This is a new technique I've not tried before so I'm at a loss. Anyone have any ideas?
  9. This unfortunately titled book changed my life. I always enjoyed cooking and idealized Julia Child & Jacque Pepin. But I was a typical home cook. I would see a recipe and try to duplicate it little understanding about what I was doing. Cooking the Nouvelle Cuisine in America talked about a philosophy of cooking. It showed me that there is more depth to cooking. A history. A philosophy. The recipes are very approachable and you can make them on a budget from grocery store ingredients. I read it as a grad student in Oregon, in the late 80's I had access to lots of fresh ingredients. And some very nice wines, cheap! I was suppose to be studying physics but I end up learning more about wine & cooking.
  10. Here is the discussion thread. Here is the Amazon link. My first recipe was Mushroom Mapo Tofu p. 132 I was blown away by how good this tasted. Very spicy! Very authentic. I didn't miss the meat at all. I told Mr. Smokey I'd add ground pork next time and he said it didn't need it. Mr. Smokey refused pork? Ha! Definitely a keeper and maybe a regular rotation spot. If I had anything negative to say, it would be the dish wasn't very filling. The recipe is suppose to serve four but the two of us finished it off, no problem, and Mister wasn't full afterwards. A soup, or an appetizer could be paired with the dish to make a heartier meal. Note: I did receive a complimentary copy of the book to review, but all opinions of the book and recipes are mine.
  11. I know several people around these parts have picked up a copy of J. Kenji López-Alt's The Food Lab, so I figured it was time to start cooking from it. Chopped Greek Salad (p. 836) This is an excellent rendition of Greek Salad, with great proportions of the various ingredients, and just the right amount of dressing. There's nothing Earth-shattering here, but it gets me off on a good foot with this cookbook.
  12. A friend gifted me a book written by someone I know of but only loosely. The acquaintance is a former missionary who has lived in Oaxaca for 15 years and co-authored this book with Susana Trilling (famous Oaxacan cooking instructor). The book is self published and really surprised me with its quality. The whole thesis is saving the indigenous foods of the area and combatting GMO infiltration of the area. Those of you who know the area might know of one of my hero restaurants - the like-minded Itanoni in Oaxaca City - surely they all travel in the same circles. Recipes are average fare - not fancy - clearly recipes from regular local folk, but very authentic, not fusion. They start with basic fresh masa, run you through all sorts of things including molé and salads and end up with stuff like yucca and egg tacos. The chapters include: Wild Greens (purslane, amaranth, etc), Beans & Squash, Salsa, Nopal and Maguey, Food and Fiesta, Medicinal uses. About 300 pages in all (so figure 150 in English and 150 in Spanish). This book is not available through Amazon. It is bilingual. I highly recommend it. Side note: Quite frankly these guys are goofs. They don't know how important and well produced this book is and aren't marketing it worth crap. Go buy it. Tell them I sent you. And enjoy this book. HERE
  13. I know I'm way late to the party, but does anyone have a copy of Los Postres De El Bulli that they would be willing to sell or knowledge of where to find one? Thanks!
  14. I must start by saying that I have huge respect for what Alex and Aki are doing. I adore their previous book and one of the first things I read in the morning is their website's mailing. In anticipation of Maximum Flavor (MF), I went back to the very beginning of their blog and read or skimmed through years of writing, witnessing how Ideas in Food have contributed to some of the big developments that characterize modern cuisine today. I live in Europe, where MF is not sold yet. I bought it through pre-order on Amazon, had it shipped to a US address and had a friend bring from there. Perhaps my expectations were too high, perhaps I have developed into a more sophisticated and knowledgeable cook over the last few years but this book was a major disappointment. The words that come to mind are: simple (selection of recipes), US focused (ingredients hard to find in Europe, brands, recipes) and unappetizing (photography, colors). This is not so say that this book is bad, but it is not a book for me any more. It is a book for a relatively average American home cook, how has somehow heard of Aki and Alex, and is willing to improve their pancake, burger and cake making. I have cooked successfully enough of complex dishes in full from Alinea, Eleven Madisson Park, Momofuku, Modernist Cuisine etc and I was craving something that would help me come up with complex and unusual flavors, that Alex and Aki can do so well (very noticeable in the first years of their blog), or even the big brother for their previous book, with more flavor enhancing techniques and brilliant recipes. In the entire book, there are perhaps two or max three things new to me, such as sugar syrup roasting nuts, the konbu beans combination and I cannot think of the third one. Also, I find a lot of ideas lacking originality - microwave sponge cakes or rough puff pastry are not exactly what I hoped to find there. I would sent the book it back but shipping costs from EU to US may outweigh the refund I can get - will look into it though. I understand this book may have a significant (US) mass appeal and be commercially attractive for the authors, I somehow feel that their brand has been diluted for me. I will never again buy a piece of their writing without having it seen first and making sure that it is what I expect it to be. [Host Note: Amazon Society-friendly link to Maximum Flavor by Aki Komozawa and Alexander Talbot]
  15. Every year I like to grab a baking cookbook or two for the house baker/my wife. What are some of the best options out there for 2013? Any eagerly anticipated gems arriving for the end-of-year blitz?
  16. I could not find much through search - I am looking for Fusion books recommendations. I quite like Fire: A World of Flavour by Christine Manfield and am looking to expand my horizons, especially in the Japanese meets West type of cooking. Thanks Bojana
  17. I thought I'd learn some more precision and improve my method of cooking vegetables, so I recently got this book. The recipes aren't complicated. Following the recipes is the tricky thing; I'm a throw-in-a-bit-of-this-and-a-bit-of-that-and-see-what-happens kind of cook. I'll write what I think of the book when I've tried a few more of the recipes. For now, here's the first one I made: Pommes rôties au laurier - roast potatoes with bay The first step in this recipe is to slit the potatoes (I used Exquisas) and slip some slivers of bay inside the incisions. Then you roast them in a mixture of stock and olive oil. Here they are ready to go in the oven: The unusual thing about these roast potatoes is that they're half-way submerged in liquid at the start of cooking. The plan is for the stock to boil off and the potatoes then to roast in the oil; you don't parboil the potatoes first. It's really more of a braise. After 40mins in the heat: The potatoes are very tender after 40mins bubbling away in their bath. They taste - and you'll hardly credit it - of bay, so can make friends with any dish that likes bay. The flavour is pronounced, but perhaps not as much as you would expect with that many leaves getting involved. They are also attractive to look at. On the other hand I had to pour the stock off for the final part of cooking as it didn't evaporate as intended. I will try the recipe again with larger potatoes and a shallower dish - the size and shape of the vessel and the vegetables are left to the imagination by the recipe. That meant pouring off the oil too, which probably affected the texture at the end. There was also a bizarrely large quantity of oil specified so I only used about a fifth of it. The potatoes taste rather one-dimensional; I would perhaps prefer them with some garlic slices stuffed inside as well. We ate them with a green salad and flageolet beans, with a French Domaine Vocoret Chablis in the glass.
  18. Hi everyone, I just had to re-sign up since it's been awhile I wanted to let you all know the awesome news that I will be releasing a book at the end of the year about my time learning the charcuterie and butchery of Spain. It's called Charcutería: The Soul of Spain, and will have a foreword by James Beard award-winning chef José Andrés. The book is going to have a bunch of traditional techniques and recipes for Spanish charcuterie and pork butchery, as well as recipes and other little tricks I picked up working with the folks in the Extremaduran countryside. My photog and I just got back from visiting Spain for the photoshoot and the guys up in Asturias did a little video about it. Here's the link to the video: http://www.whereisasturias.com/?p=6602 And a link to our FB page (Lots more photos... please like!): https://www.facebook.com/charcuteriaspain?ref=ts&fref=ts Please feel free to write me if you have any requests or questions for the book--really trying to make something that my fellow meatheads and sausage nerds can get into. Ciao, jeff PS: As a little offering to my hopefully-new eGullet pals here's a sexy photo from the Jamón slicing shoot. Tatoos and meat...
  19. I'm considering buying Florence Lin's Complete Book of Chinese Noodles, Dumplings and Breads. It's out of print but it's possible to get hold of it but it's expensive. I've seen some brief reviews on this site and basically, most of them rate it quite well if not highly. I would like to hear what people who've got this book think of it? Have they tried making noodles from the recipes provided? Have they made any of the noodle soups/dishes and how did they turn out? And also, how to you rate the dumplings and bread recipes? It's a shame that they don't do a re-print. Thanks in advance.
  20. 165, 124. That's a lotta cookbooks, but I know it's nowhere near the true figure. C'mon, guys. Fess up. [Moderator note: The original Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? topic became too large for our servers to handle efficiently, so we've divided it up; the preceding part of this discussion is here: Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 4)]
  21. Thomas Keller has a new cookbook, Ad Hoc at Home, arriving in stores in time for the winter gift season. The amazon page doesn't include a "Look Inside!" feature, so there's not a lot of information there, but the book is focused on US home cooking, comfort foods in particular, as served at the Yountville restaurant of the same name. Definitely worth checking out. Does anyone have any advance peeks to share?
  22. I have never posted on this board and have no relationship to the cookbook that I am about to shill. I was recently at Kitchen Arts and Letters where they were featuring a quarterly cookbook named Canal House Cooking. It is self published by Christopher Hirsheimer and Melissa Hamilton (Gabriella of Prune's sister),two Saveur expats. The first book is just wonderful, simple and has lovely recipes, although lacking in deserts. It reminds me a bit of Suzanne Goin with less labor. After reading the first book, I immediately subscribed for the frest of the year. It's not expensive either.
  23. Hello All, Just saw this new book pop up on Amazon.ca "Pierre Hermé’s Pop Up Fétiches" and am curious if anyone has any details. I've never seens a pop up cooking book....but I hope it does contain some newer recipes.
  24. So I've been very kindly given a copy of the original 1938 French edition of Larousse Gastronomique, except that it seems to have been updated in 1947/48 which I can't find documented anywhere. I'd be interested to know more about the original and slightly updated version(s) if anyone has a true 1938 copy. While browsing through mine, we were perplexed to discover a colour plate with an image of a table of cheese and wine where the wine bottles bore labels "1947" and "1945". Furthermore, on the back of the Vins plate is a table of vintages up to 1947 (opposite page 1069). 16 of the plates plates have black text and a serif font, while 20 have blue sans serif text. The page with the above years showing is a blue sans serif plate for Fromages (after page 498). None of the imprint pages in the book show any later dates than 1938. The very last page with any text says: The book is dark green with an embossed image of chickens on spits in front of golden flames. The title is in gold with the G of GASTRONOMIQUE being larger than the following letters. I've seen an image on the web of a similar cover but with the G the same size as the other letters -- that example seems to have been a later cover for the same edition of the book. The dust jacket spine is in three parts: centre panel is white and yellow text on red; top panel is a woman in apron standing at a stove; bottom panel is a chef with toque adding wine to a saucepan. Any enlightening info about minor revisions/versions of the first edition?
  25. I have copies of MasterCook 2,3,4, and 5. I have used them off and on, but never really focused energy on entering all of my recipes into it. I mostly just type things in WordPerfect then print them out and keep them in a binder. I am pretty familiar with entering recipes, formatting the pages, getting the nutritional values, and setting up shopping lists. What I am not certain about, and cannot seem to find info on is how to lay out pages for submission to a publisher or agent. I don't have a contract or anything, I am just looking to submit cold. I know the general guidelines for submitting fiction and TV scripts to publishers, I used to write for television & my husband is a published fiction author, but I haven't seen details for cookbooks anywhere. I am assuming that it's the usual 1" margins, double-spaced, Times New Roman only. Here are some of my questions: If I want to submit my photos (printed with my printer on 8½ x 11 paper) with the project do they get inserted in the manuscript in the spots where they would appear in the finished book, or as a group in the back? Do photos get a title sheet in front of them, or can they have a description printed on the same page? If I want to write my recipes with the ingredients list in both US and metric weights, is it ok to type that out in two columns? (think RLB's Cake Bible) Do sidebars get typed out in the same format (margins) as everything else? Do I place them after or before the recipe they relate to? Do any publishers accept digital submissions using any of the cookbook software on the market? Any input would be appreciated, thanks!
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