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  1. I just got this book yesterday and I must say, I'm quite intrigued by some (if not most) of the recipes. Does anybody here have this book, and if so, have you used it? I'm tentatively looking for that one book to cook myself all the way through (like the French Laundry, Alinea, etc blogs). From what I've read so far, I can get pretty much everything needed at local Asian markets. I'd be curious to hear from others that might have used this book already, as sometimes books read nicer than they actually work in the end... The book is thinner than I expected, but it's really a gorgeous publication with very good and appetizing photos. Lots of technique photos too with step by step instructions. While I really don't care for the "cooking" show Iron Chef at all, I must say that I'm very impressed by this book so far, and it at least appears that Morimoto was very involved in it's creation. Lots of personal little anecdotes just add to the fun of reading. Oliver PS: I did a search here and could not find a thread about this book, if there is one I'm sorry for starting a new one.
  2. Anthony Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook: Stategies, Recipes, and Techniques of Classic Bistro Cooking.
  3. Elie Nassar (aka our own FoodMan) follows Walsh from Paris, France to Paris, Texas in pursuit of authentic food and the real history of "the ugly duckling of American regional cuisines." * * * Be sure to check The Daily Gullet home page daily for new articles (most every weekday), hot topics, site announcements, and more.
  4. I'm currently reading Julia Child's memoirs, and plan to start on the new Gael Greene book after that. And then, there's nothing on the agenda, and I'm getting worried about that. What is new out there that I may be missing? What's Michael Ruhlman working on? How about Ruth Reichl? (Yes, I've read Garlic & Sapphires. Loved it.) Amanda Hesser? others?
  5. Hi , I'm always somewhat hesitant to prepare schezuan dishes since the recipes I seem to find rarely lead me to results that replicate what I get at a good restaurant. However, both me and my husband are very fond of schezuan cooking and would love to prepare our favorite food at home. Does anyone know of a good book that might be able to help me get started? thanks in advance, w@w
  6. Hi all, I was wondering if I could enlist you for some help. I returned to Montreal 2 years ago after a long absence and I 'm really loving the food and restaurants here-- o.k. maybe not so much the mexican or some of the take out chinese, but who's counting? I digress. So what I was wondering was if I could get some cookbook reccomendations for quebecios chefs. They can be in french, that's no problem. And since I happily cook meat for others, but I am not a huge fan of meat/ poultry and am alergic to seafood, I'm looking for books that are not too heavy on animal protein. I'm not looking for a vegetarian cookbook, but am trying to avoid books that are 75% meat and seafood recipes (this is what I encountered with Daniel Vezina's books). Right now I don't have too much to rely on other than a la Distasio, which I watch pretty regularily. Seems like a lot of her guests are celebrities, and not chefs though. Having recieved her book as an xmas gift, I will say that it's a good reference book for timing oven roasted vegetables and has some quick ideas for busy cooks, but I don't find myself running to it to try something different. I should also mention that I am not really a fan of Jamie Oliverish books either, which maybe part of my problem with distasio. I like recipes that are dead on (as in Alain Ducasse dead on). I hate books that don't give specific quanties or use vague terms like add x ingredient to taste. (I know quite well what my taste is and I buy books in order to NOT make things to my taste). Thanks in advance, chantal
  7. I've been wanting this book for awhile, but I thought I'd ask if anyone has had any experiences (good or bad) with these recipes. The desserts look extraordinary, and I'm looking for book with desserts for special occassions.
  8. Thomas Keller's Bouchon just arrived in the mail after 4 weeks delay from Jessica's Biscuits. I'll be cooking from it over the next couple of weeks. Anyone out there care to trade notes on successes and failures? Leek and Potato soup tonight.
  9. I'm asked about this all the time. I mean ALL the time by English and French speakers. (As if I'm reading Julia Childs or something. ) I have no idea what to recommend. I understand that English is lingua franca here, but I also need some French language books. Help!
  10. Due to a miscalculation of my own cooking ability I was left with a kilo of masa harina and some fresh yeast after the weekends Mexican cooking. So I combined the two. I made a fairly straight forward hearth cake mix then cooked in very slowly on on side until the bottom was brown and very crisp, while the top was soft, but cooked though. This was then filled with some bean chile that I made. Thus: OK, it was very good and with a bit of refinement it could be even better, but my question is, is this type of yeast cooking done in the Mexican kitchen (if so recipes or descriptions) or have I invented the fluffy taco?
  11. Inspired by the current recipe preferences thread, I got to thinking about recipe style guides. All of the newspapers I know of have style guides, and I can't imagine that they don't exist for recipes as well. If you have experience with these, can you share some insights about them? What guidelines are you given? Do they differ from magazine to magazine, publisher to publisher? Do they crimp your style, or keep you on the straight and narrow?
  12. Having read the thread with the Q&A session with Sam Mason, I got to wondering about what subjects in the baking and pastry arts is most lacking when it comes to books. ( and also about who I would like to see a book from ) In recent months I have read about the following PC's plans to write books, hopefully to be out sooner than later: Pichet Ong ( formerly of Spice Market in NYC ) Patrick Coston ( now Exec PC at the Ritz Carlton Las Vegas ) Kate Zuckerman ( PAD Top 10 winner, PC at Chanterelle in NYC ) Johnny Iuzzini ( Jean Georges PC ) Sherry Yard ( PC at Spago - a 2nd book for her ) I am looking forward to Coston's book, as I am a fan of his style, beginning from when he was in LV for the 1st time, at Picasso in the Bellagio. As far as subjects, I would love to see an AFFORDABLE book(s) on chocolate and sugar showpieces. ( The only ones I see recently cost more than $100 ). Also would like to see more books on Entrements ( for professionals that is - books on cakes for home cooks are easy to come by ). As far as for books by people, a book by Jean-Philippe Maury of the Bellagio ( on any subject ) would be a must have for me. My biggest problem ( besides having a list of books that cost $1,500 total ) is that I am very weary of buying a book that I can't browse through ( like from JB Prince or CHIPS BOOK ). I own many books but only go to a few for inspirations, so buying a book " blind" that could basically contain stuff that may be of very little use to me, plus cost so much, is very undaunting to me. So, who or what would you like to see written by or about? Jason
  13. Hi Sara -- thanks for joining us this week and giving us your insights into your career and food world. I've been anticipating your Spotlight for a very long time. In terms of the outside sources by which you draw inspiration, what are some of your favorite cookbooks on your shelves? And which do you find yourself turning to most often? What has the most sentimental value to you?
  14. Do any of you have the following Susan Purdy books: "Have Your Cake And Eat it Too," "Let Them Eat Cake," and "Perfect Cake" (used to be "Piece Of Cake.")? I'm thinking of ordering them, but would like your feedback. Thanks.
  15. I guess Suneeta has been working on her cookbook for upwards of 20 years. It is out now. I've done a bunch of recipes from it, and I know many of them from her cooking classes here in Houston. The book is excellent. I love the way the book is laid out, it is designed to make following the recipes fast and easy. There are three columns for each recipe, the left column has the measures listed in English units, the center column lists the ingredients, and the right column has the measures listed in metric units. The cooking instructions are excellent. The headnotes consist of information on the dish and tips for the dish. This is a cookbook by a teacher who knows how to put a recipe together. Here's the beauty of the book, by way of example. How many times have you seen a cookbook recipe that calls for, say, "1 onion chopped"? What size onion would that be, exactly? Here in Texas an onion can be pretty bid. In Europe, they aren't as big. What Suneeta has done is demystify the list of ingredients by using measures of cups, teaspoons, and tablespoons, or, metric weights. This is awesome! It makes the recipes foolproof. And it gives you a baseline for later changing the recipe up to suit personal tastes. I own 5 Indian cookbooks, and I have read quite a few more. But this is the one that I will default to. This book should be in every cook's collection. It is that good. I would recommend starting with the following: Chicken in Cashew Saffron Gravy North Indian Lamb Curry on Bread Whole Baked Masala Cauliflower Bell Peppers with Roasted Chickpea Flour Dhokla (a fast and easy recipe using cream of wheat that produces beautiful results) Split Yellow Peas with Tamarind Chutney Gena's Kababs (flavored with green onions, ginger, cilantro, crisp fried onions)
  16. I posted a similar request in the cooking section and thought I'd ask here as well. I'm looking for the ultimate, most complete, comprehensive and authentic cookbook for Indian cuisine to add to my library. What do you recommend? Thanks for your comments.
  17. I've noticed some really good deals via Amazon, Jessica Books, etc. I've been ordering things thru my friend in Seattle and he brings them to me so I can save on shipping and handling fees. I've not had it sent to my Vancouver address because I believe there are hidden costs. Has anyone ordered anything from the states? What were you charged as far as duty, taxes, etc? If I'm only saving a couple of dollars thru my friend, then I'll not trouble him and have it sent directly to me. BTW, books in Vancouver are so much more expensive...even if you have a Chapters card!
  18. I love old cookbooks. They’re sort of like the next best thing to a time machine. There are some really interesting cultural clues in the old ones. The recipes from, say, the WWII era and the post-WWII era help those of us who weren’t around to understand what a lot of life was about. And the more adventurous old cookbooks are so cute. Despite our ideas of our americanized forebears being strictly meat-and-potatoes folk, some of the most interesting cookbooks encourage housewives to try new foods. My favorite old cookbooks (at least of those in my possession) are **Meatless Meals, 1943, geared at helping housewives deal with meat rationing. Its recipes include Sauerkraut Fritters, Succotash and Mushroom Thermidor, and Spaghetti Rarebit. **50 Dishes from Overseas, 1944. This one has dishes organized by country and by ingredient. Chapters include “Gooseberry Novelties from Brittany,” “New Zealand Beetroot Dishes,” “South African Ways with Steak,” and “Tennis Sundaes from Africa.” Every third recipe begins some sort of appeal to take the recipe seriously, like “veal tongue prepared in the Viennese way needs trying to be appreciated. It will be liked once tried.” **And the piece d’ resistance, The Housekeeper Cook Book, published in 1894 by the New England Furniture and Carpet Co. This large and decrepit book has many dozen pie recipes, at least 10 recipes for homemade root beer, a whole chapter on ginger breads, and detailed instructions for how to a) boil coffee and b) care for an invalid. It also has a three-meal menu for every day of the year. If you’re curious about what today’s menu would have been 109 years ago, here it is: Breakfast: Pancakes, maple syrup, fried potatoes, venison steak, celery. Dinner: Whitesoup [sic], baked trout, baked potatoes, stewed tomatoes, corn, blueberry pie, apples. Supper: Butter toast, dried beef, hot biscuit, honey. (Can’t wait until the 15th – breakfast is something called “California breakfast food”!) What is it about these old gems that’s so fascinating? Do you have a favorite cookbook, or recipe from an old cookbook? (edited for editing)
  19. Slate article Marvelous article on the history leading up to today and describing some of the ways in which Gourmet Magazine has evolved. What a great read! And the cookbook is something I will definitely look at with an eye toward purchasing!
  20. and where should i store an opened bottle?
  21. First a little explanation... I keep all of my recipes in Word files. These are in a plain, utilitarian format. From time to time, I will print them out and put them in a plastic sleeve in a utilitarian 3-ring binder. That is handy, because I can remove the page and pin it with a magnet to some convenient place in the kitchen while I am cooking. Now to my problem... For Christmas, the kids are requesting such a thing for a gift. I really don't want to give them something entirely as bare bones as what I have. They do want a binder with the plastic sleeves. I have said that is probably more practical that I send them a CD from time to time because I update them regularly. Nope. They want a book. I have searched the Microsoft site for templates and find none for recipes. I may have to "upgrade" my Word skills to come up with a classy template, uh... geese with blue bows and grapevines need not apply. But, where do you find attractive binders? I know there is a world out there that is into scrapbooking and maybe that is a source for something interesting. I just don't know about it. Have any of you ever done something like this? Any ideas? Thanks... Frantic Mother
  22. The Dec. 20 edition of Hanamaru Market (Japanese only) featured vacuum cooking with a rice cooker with a keep warm function. I think I'll try this method to make roast beef as one of New Year dishes (osechi) and report on the outcome. In the meantime, anyone interested is encouraged to try this method before I do. The following are rough translations of two of the recipes presented in the TV show: 1. The simplest recipe: Ingredients: 200 g chicken Salt and pepper 1. Rinse chicken with water (or with sake (Japanese rice wine) to get rid of the smell). 2. Drain and cut into manageable chunks, then season with salt and pepper. 3. Put them in a Ziploc bag, put a straw in, and seal the bag. Suck air out of the bag. Remove the straw, taking care not to let air in, and seal the bag. 4. Put 2 cups (i.e., 400 cc) of hot water of 60 to 70 degrees centigrade (140 to 158 deg. Fahrenheit) in the rice cooker and put the bag in. 5. Put the lid on, press the keep warm button to heat for 50 minutes. 2. Roast beef Ingredients for 2 servings 200 g beef Black pepper Salt 1/2 clove garlic 1. Sprinkle salt and pepper on beef. 2. Put the beef in a Ziploc bag and add garlic. 3. Suck air out with a straw. 4. Put water of 60 to 70 degrees centigrade in the rice cooker, put the bag, and press the keep warm button. 5) Leave it for 40 to 50 minutes.
  23. Monica, Any suggestions on how I should work with your book? What do you think is best way of reading it, cooking with it? Do you have favorite recipes?
  24. Forget about which Food TV personality you are! This, I think, takes the (colored with saffron and stuffed with honey and dried figs) cake for cooking-related quizzes. I give you: Which Medieval or Renaissance Cookbook Are You? Me, I'm Platina's De Honesta Voluptate. Well, at least it's in Latin...
  25. Perusing the international cookbooks at my local Barnes & Noble today and what did I spy but the new cookbook by our own Suvir Saran, "Indian Home Cooking"! So of course I picked up a copy. It appears to be chock full of excellent and very approachable recipes, as well as Suvir's terrific notes and comments regarding his remembrances of each dish. Although I couldn't resist bringing it home from the B&N, I did check to see if it's available on Amazon through the eGullet link. It is, of course, and ten bucks cheaper. Congratulations, Suvir. Well done. I know you're proud and you should be.
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