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Found 955 results

  1. I'm been interested in Latin American cooking lately. This has been prompted by watching Rick Bayless and enjoying a variety of really good food from the street food scene. I want to pick up several solid cookbooks and maybe some good books about ingredients. I'm more interested in traditional recipes/cooking methods. I'm a pretty good cook but I am new to cooking this type of food at home. I like to have books that include the following: *Cooking meats like al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, etc. *Soups and stews *Different types moles, salsas and other sauces *Empanadas *Pupusas *Tamales - love to learn the different types *Alfajores Thanks!
  2. swissmiss

    Cookbooks

    Thank you for your fascinating answers so far. I am also amazed by the photos on your website. Do you use/read cookbooks? If yes, which ones do you favor and why?
  3. What do you guys do when you buy a new book? Read through for ideas? Make one or two recipes? Cook your way through it (in any meaning of the phrase)? Just to add to the discussion, I have... ten, including a gem from the feminist '70s called "The Political Palate".
  4. hillvalley

    Her First Cookbook

    My sister just discovered cooking last week. So far she has made stir fry and tried her own tomato sauce, which she burned. She has announced to our family that I am allowed to buy her one cookbook for Channukah and that is it. My question is, which book should it be? I am looking for a basic cookbook and am leaning towards Joy of Cooking. She needs a book that has the basics, like how to cook a potato, but has room to expand, should she feel so inclined. Thoughts, suggestions?
  5. currypuff

    Vegan baking books

    I'd like to cut back on dairy... but one of my big problems is cutting butter and milk/cream out of my diet, ESPECIALLY baked goods. Does anyone have suggestions for baking books that have reasonably tasty recipes using moderately easy to find and not overly expensive ingredients? I don't want to have to go out and buy a whole whack of fancy ingredients over and above what I stock in my regular pantry for baking. I've looked on amazon and there do seem to be a few good ones.... Also, does anyone have a coconut macaroon recipe that doesn't involve egg whites?
  6. Raw Tuscan Kale Salad with Chiles and Pecorino p.63 I found myself a few minutes from the Farmer's Market that was sure to have Tuscan Kale so I decided to take the plunge. The kale ($1.50) was lovely. The recipe calls for the dressing to be made separately in a bowl but I made it directly in the large bowl I was going to toss the kale in so as not to lose any bits and to even further simplify things. I did not have pecorino so I did sub a nutty asiago. After letting it rest the requisite initial 5 minutes I sampled directly from the bowl. Verdict: really good - I could have put a serious dent in the huge bowl but I wanted to give it some more resting time. An hour later I sampled again and realized that the cold had muted the flavors. After letting it come to room temp, it was even better for its rest. The recipe calls for the salad to be served with toasted bread crumbs, preferably from whole wheat or rye. I had no bread in the house, so taking a cue from her raw brussels sprouts variation I toasted a few walnuts, smashed them with my handy kitchen brick, and tossed them over for an experiment. They were mildly interesting but I preferred the simpler form. I might try it next time with the bread crumbs, or using pecorino versus the asiago, but I really like it as is.
  7. With all the new cookbooks I'm sure we've received for the holidays, has anyone started throwing out/giving away/selling their books to make room? What criteria do you have for keeping or throwing away your books? I'm already beginning to look in askance at some books that were gifts, and I only have one small shelf of cookbooks. It seems obvious that you'd get rid of books you never use, but has anyone ever thrown away a copy because they've used it too much?
  8. ChrisTaylor

    Apicius

    I'd like a copy of Apicius. I'd like an English translation and I'd prefer--really prefer--it to have no substitutes for ingredients. Or, if it does include substitutes, to also mention what the original ingredient was. I've looked at a couple of online versions and found it doesn't tell you what the original item was. What's the best and most reliable hardcopy translation?
  9. I'm interested in collecting books that feature good recipes for home style dishes from around the world. I have a fairly extensive collection, ranging from fairly broad Eastern European and South American books to region-specific titles such as The Illustrated Cape Malay Cookbook and Catalan Cuisine. I'm missing some, tho', and I'm looking for recommendations to fill the gaps. I'd like recommendations for ... Nordic (I have Noma, of course, but I'm after the sort of food normal people cook at home and traditional dishes) Hawaii and other Pacific islands Caribbean (all I can find at the moment are the Levi Roots books--and I'm not sure if a series of books by a very rich musician with a side line in hot sauce is what I'm after) African (I have a few African books, actually, mostly South African, and most of them are shit) Polish Indigenous Australian Irish (looking at the Coleman Andrews one at the moment--thoughts?) US--beyond New Orleans/Cajun/Creole (already have a couple of good books on that), ideally including something about the Texan/Mexican border area Mongolian Arab (think Saudi Arabia/Kuwait/Yemen as opposed to Lebanon/Syria/Israel) Croat/Serb/Bosnian Belgian Dutch Chinese Islamic Macanese
  10. I want to try out some desserts or sweets prepared in Lebanese style. Please suggest some desserts.
  11. Pweaver1984

    Cuisine Spontanee

    Just wondering if anyone has this book? I have his Girardet book published in 2002, which I really like. Is it a lot different? Translation good? Worth having?
  12. Starkman

    Cooking with aluminum . . . bad?

    Hello all, I was wondering what the updated information out there is about cooking with (uncoated) aluminum. There was the theory that aluminum has been found to cause or increase alzheimer's disease. It's also been said that aluminum is toxic to the body (too much of it, at least). If you do cook with aluminum, do you use coated or straight aluminum? Thanks, Starkman
  13. So I figured I'd 'fess up. I tend to get an inspired to buy cookbooks from different sources. Sometimes amazon, sometimes people's reccomendation, and yes the egullet forums. Recently two times I purchased a cookbook that I already had. (of course I do have several hundred). So I was wondering if I"m the only one, or has this happened to anyone else?
  14. My copy of eGullet Society board member Paula Wolfert's Mediterranean Clay Pot Cooking arrived a few days ago. I know many members have been waiting for it as long as I have, especially those who helped Paula with her recipe testing. And it looks like it's more than worth the wait. A helpful clay pot primer on types of clay pots and how to season them starts off the book. Chapters follow on First Courses Soups Fish and Shellfish Chicken, Duck and Other Poultry Meats Pasta and Grains Vegetables and Beans Savory Pies and Breads Egg and Dairy dishes Desserts Has anyone else seen the book yet? What do you think?
  15. Supposedly coming out this year. Anyone know anything?
  16. jessicahowles

    Cooking without additives

    Hi guys, I read about some bakers (most notably Japanese ones) who don't use additives in their baking. I have heard of cases where baking soda, baking powder, gelatin and artificial flavorings are avoided. Just want to know what you guys think about it and whether it is something which is commonly practiced by other pastry chefs.
  17. Having read the thread with the Q&A session with Sam Mason, I got to wondering about what subjects in the baking and pastry arts is most lacking when it comes to books. ( and also about who I would like to see a book from ) In recent months I have read about the following PC's plans to write books, hopefully to be out sooner than later: Pichet Ong ( formerly of Spice Market in NYC ) Patrick Coston ( now Exec PC at the Ritz Carlton Las Vegas ) Kate Zuckerman ( PAD Top 10 winner, PC at Chanterelle in NYC ) Johnny Iuzzini ( Jean Georges PC ) Sherry Yard ( PC at Spago - a 2nd book for her ) I am looking forward to Coston's book, as I am a fan of his style, beginning from when he was in LV for the 1st time, at Picasso in the Bellagio. As far as subjects, I would love to see an AFFORDABLE book(s) on chocolate and sugar showpieces. ( The only ones I see recently cost more than $100 ). Also would like to see more books on Entrements ( for professionals that is - books on cakes for home cooks are easy to come by ). As far as for books by people, a book by Jean-Philippe Maury of the Bellagio ( on any subject ) would be a must have for me. My biggest problem ( besides having a list of books that cost $1,500 total ) is that I am very weary of buying a book that I can't browse through ( like from JB Prince or CHIPS BOOK ). I own many books but only go to a few for inspirations, so buying a book " blind" that could basically contain stuff that may be of very little use to me, plus cost so much, is very undaunting to me. So, who or what would you like to see written by or about? Jason
  18. mamster

    Cookbook

    One of the criticisms of your work has been that it's all about the drunken attitude, not enough about the food. Are you going to show your critics up by doing a cookbook aimed at the home cook?
  19. prasantrin

    learning about wine

    A friend and I found a fabulous wine shop yesterday, and she kept saying, "This one is supposed to be quite good," while we were checking out the wines. I finally asked her, "How do you know?" and she replied, "It was in my comic book." In Japan, where I am, there is a manga called "Kami no Shizuku" aka "Drops of God" and it's all about wine. Always wanting to learn more about wine (because I know nothing), I'm looking for an English version. I know it has been translated into Korean, but I have not yet found any info on an English version. Do you oenophiles think there might be a market for a comic about wine? I think there might be a bit of a snob appeal to wine in the English-speaking world that might preclude an English-version of a wine comic book, but I'm hopeful for a translation of the original. And if I can't find one, I guess it's a good reason for me to practise reading Japanese... By the way, at this wine shop a '03 (I think) bottle of Stag's Leap (I can't remember the grape) was going for Y25000 (just over US$200)...or maybe it was Y32000 (about US$270). Edited to add: if you're interested in seeing what the comic looks like, this blog is a diary of the wines mentioned in the comic. Scroll down for pics of some of the covers. (the site is in Japanese) You can also see pictures of the wines, if you're interested.
  20. Jakea222

    Hotel Cookbooks

    I have had a couple of famous 5 star resort cookbooks and am wanting to expand that collection. Example - The Waldorf Astoria - The Greenbrier Hotel and I want to know if you guys know of sites that I could find OR know of good specific books that would be on the same level of "fine" dining hotels and resorts that I should add to my new collection. Thanks
  21. Don't know if anyone out there can help me with this. About 10 years ago I was in a used book store here in scenic central Oklahoma and there were several copies of a cookbook which, as I recall, basically glorified in a rather tongue-in-cheek way the food of the 1950s. I think the cover was done in shades of pink and black. I'm trying to locate this book and can't seem to get at a title or author. This is not aided by the fact that my memory may be faulty on the look of the cover. Does anyone have a clue what this cookbook might be? Any help would be much appreciated... Thanks, Rinsewind
  22. It's All American Food I just ordered this from Amazon. Looks like an older book, out of print. Is anyone familiar with it? Here is some of the book on GOOGLE Book Search I enjoy Rosengarten's "goofy prose" (to quote a review) and wish Taste were on again Anyway, for $5 how bad can it be? ETA: links/clarification
  23. I run a food blog called Wrightfood - http://www.mattikaarts.com/blog The Wrightfood cookbook has been in the works for quite a while now. I first came up with the idea over a year ago, and have been working on it ever since. The book is far from being done - only about 50% has been written and photographed in fact, but I wanted to get peoples opinions on the food, the photographs, the pacing of the recipes and so forth. Friends have said they love it, but then they would, they are friends. I need as many people as possible to take a look, and to let me know what they think - honestly. So, here it is. The Wrightfood cookbook. The aim of the book is not to have thousands of recipes (this, as you see it here, is about 50% of what it will contain), but rather just a handful of really well documents quality recipes. Every stage in each recipe is documented with photographs, and decent descriptions. The idea is that a new cook and pick this up, and with little practice produce the food in here. No stone is left unturned, nothing is left to guesswork. The food is simple, clean, tasty and fresh. http://www.mattikaarts.com/wrightfood/press/wrightfood.pdf - here it is. You will need Adobe reader to view it. Hope you enjoy it, and let me know what you think. The cookbook website is: http://www.mattikaarts.com/wrightfood - you can find out more about me and the book there.
  24. I just bought the River Cottage Handbook on making preserves, and I'm interested in getting one or two more. Can anyone here recommend a decent book on the subject? Ideally they would discuss a natural process, with as few unsavory ingredients as possible, or they would spend a fair amount of time discussing traditional ways of making jams (as opposed to modern ways that utilize newfangled equipment).
  25. tabascomutt

    Thai cookbooks

    Does anyone out there have any good suggestions for Thai food? I just moved to Seattle and am surrounded by fantastic Thai restaurants and am wanting to try it at home.
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