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Found 955 results

  1. The cooking with Modernist Cuisine at Home topic seems to have mostly run its course as many of us have had the book for quite a while. One thing I like a lot about the book is that it presents ideas for variations along with the recipes and presents many variations of ways of achieving similar results. So my motivation for this topic is to have a place to talk about our experiments in modifying the recipes - successful or not. You see I have difficulty following instructions... To start, is serendipity with this post in the sous vide thread asking about using bag juice that came out right as I finished up an experiment with the red wine glaze. The experiment was motivated by a mistake where I made SV short ribs at too high a temperature a while back. The meat was not very good but juice was wonderful. So instead of frying up a bunch of ground beef, I took a half kilo of relatively lean stewing beef and bunged it in the SV at 88 C for an hour. At the end of that time the meat was dry and the bag full of meat juice. The juice was very clear and light in colour with little in the way of 'gunk'. I added it to the wine and veg, started reducing, then strained the veg out and reduced the rest of the way. I skipped pressure cooking the knucklebones (I'm not sure why the recipe has you reduce the wine, then add water to pressure cook the bones, why not cook the bones in the wine then reduce?) To cut to the chase, I was quite happy with the result. I don't agree with the 'fat is flavour' mantra and the only fat in this was the little that rendered out of the meat in the SV. I might try adding a little gelatin for mouth feel and to make the glaze with less reduction. ... and the dog was happy with the dried out meat for his tea-time.
  2. Shel_B

    Cooking with Sherry

    I've just recetly started to use sherry in my cooking, and thus far it's been to add flavor to soup, stock, and sauces, and to deglaze pans. I know there are different styles of sherry, and certainly a wide range of prices and, perhaps, even quality. However, for the described purposes, does the style, price, and quality make much, if any, difference. Rightg now I'm using a bottle of Amontillado that I picked up at TJ's for about $7.00 or so, and it seems to be OK. Any comments would be very welcome. Thanks!
  3. Does anyone know of cookbooks that cover the cooking of the Indian diaspora? I'm researching some stories on Indian cookbooks, and I thought this would be an interesting angle. The few such cookbooks I've seen are fascinating - familiar Indian recipes, but with differences in ingredients and influences that reflect the histories of these communities. I guess many of these cookbooks are conscious attempts to commemorate these communities, so they all filled with anecdotes and nostalgia that make them really interesting, and often moving, reading. I know the classic South African Indian 'bible' - Zuleikha Mayat's 'Indian Delights'. I have some South African Indian relatives myself, the wives of my Gujarati cousins who now live in India, and make some interesting recipes which they tell me they brought with them from SA. For example, they take kandh - yam with a weirdly blue-purple coloured flesh - and cook it and slice it thinly and use these slices to sandwich a mixture of grated coconut and coriander leaves and some other spices. It looks bizarre: purple sandwiches with a white-green filling, but tastes great. I've just picked up another really interesting book: Recipes of the Jaffna Tamils, edited by Nesa Eliezer and printed by Orient Longman. Since Jaffna is just a strait's distance from Tamil Nadu one wouldn't expect the food to be that different, and much of it is standard Tamil stuff. But there are interesting variations, like a whole section on recipes using the products of the palmyra palm. Also, and I realise this might sound political, but its not meant to be, Tamil Brahmin cuisine and culture seems to have less of a hold in Sri Lanka as it does in India. So while the image of Tamil food in India is dominated by vegetarian Brahmin cooking (at least till the recent rise of 'Chettiar' cooking), the recipes in this book reflect the non-vegetarian cooking that is very much a part of Non-Brahmin Tamil life. A recipe for rasam flavoured with chicken bones for example sounds really surprising to someone used to the common vegetarian only version. Are there other such cookbooks for the desi communities in Trinidad, Mauritius, Fiji and where else? A friend who was coming from Guyana promised to get me a Guyanese-Indian cookbook, though unfortunately he cancelled his trip at the last minute. (But this link has some interesting recipes: http://guyana.gwebworks.com/recipes/recipe...pes_alpha.shtml ) Any names, comments, recipes, suggestions from people with experience of desi diasporic cooking would be welcome. Vikram
  4. I am interested in knowing if any of you bakers out there have any or all of the following books by Ms. Beranbaum: The Cake Bible The Bread Bible The Pie and Pastry Bible I have read conflicting reviews of these books. A lot of people say the recipes are overly complicated and that if you are the tiniest bit off in your measuring, the end result will be a flop. Others think the books are the holy grail. As I am considering getting these books, I would appreciate your input. I am not a professional baker but I have a many years of baking experience. Thank you.
  5. jmridd

    Ebooks

    Quick thought: A lot of textbooks these days are going digital; the publishers offer a copy to download from their website at a lower cost. Do you think the same could or would or will happen with cookbooks? I think it would be wonderful if they did... just think about the database of recipes you could search through instantly on your computer...
  6. It's All American Food I just ordered this from Amazon. Looks like an older book, out of print. Is anyone familiar with it? Here is some of the book on GOOGLE Book Search I enjoy Rosengarten's "goofy prose" (to quote a review) and wish Taste were on again Anyway, for $5 how bad can it be? ETA: links/clarification
  7. Raw Tuscan Kale Salad with Chiles and Pecorino p.63 I found myself a few minutes from the Farmer's Market that was sure to have Tuscan Kale so I decided to take the plunge. The kale ($1.50) was lovely. The recipe calls for the dressing to be made separately in a bowl but I made it directly in the large bowl I was going to toss the kale in so as not to lose any bits and to even further simplify things. I did not have pecorino so I did sub a nutty asiago. After letting it rest the requisite initial 5 minutes I sampled directly from the bowl. Verdict: really good - I could have put a serious dent in the huge bowl but I wanted to give it some more resting time. An hour later I sampled again and realized that the cold had muted the flavors. After letting it come to room temp, it was even better for its rest. The recipe calls for the salad to be served with toasted bread crumbs, preferably from whole wheat or rye. I had no bread in the house, so taking a cue from her raw brussels sprouts variation I toasted a few walnuts, smashed them with my handy kitchen brick, and tossed them over for an experiment. They were mildly interesting but I preferred the simpler form. I might try it next time with the bread crumbs, or using pecorino versus the asiago, but I really like it as is.
  8. It's $100.00 with an 8" knife included...although I can't see what brand knife it is. Just wondering if anyone has taken this class and what you thought of it. Feedback? Classes offered
  9. Forget about which Food TV personality you are! This, I think, takes the (colored with saffron and stuffed with honey and dried figs) cake for cooking-related quizzes. I give you: Which Medieval or Renaissance Cookbook Are You? Me, I'm Platina's De Honesta Voluptate. Well, at least it's in Latin...
  10. Does anyone know the status of Trotter's new books that were suppose to come out last fall? I believe one was called: "Lessons in Wine Service" and the other was a wholesale re-write of his original cookbook.
  11. The Country Cooking of Ireland was named Cookbook of the Year by The James Beard Foundation. I have not heard of this book and have found no mention of it on this site. I was wondering who has it and your thoughts about it. Dan
  12. stagis

    Cooking with Boy Scouts

    So - I recently resigned as Scoutmaster due to health problems and assumed my new post as Assistant Scoutmaster in Charge of Eating. Boy Scouts are 11-17 years old and their tastes are um, different than adults. My statement to them is that they can cook anything they eat at home over a fire. This includes, but is not limited to, open fires, charcoal, backpack stoves and Dutch ovens. They'll also use, on occasion, solar cookers, cardboard-box ovens (ask me some time) and other various weird implements. My first lecture was "40 Ways to Die From Eating". I went over, basically, health and safety. "Though shalt not put chicken in your pack the Thursday before an outing" "Though shalt not eat anything unless it's clean" etc., etc. "If you eat this, you'll go to the hospital, then probably die." "If you eat this, you'll sit on the crapper until you die." "If you put this in a fire, it'll explode and you'll die before anyone can get to you." This is all basically tongue-in-cheek, but I was trying to impress on them the importance of cleanliness. I even made up a song: Salmonella, salmonella, can we all sing Salmonella? (sung to the melody of Cinderella) Anyway - I know that there's a zillion recipes out there on backpack sites, dutch oven sites, etc. But I feel it incumbent upon myself to at least check with the Gulleteers to see what ideas they can come up with. The idea here is that during the winter, we'll stay cold and can pack pretty-much any food we want. Weight is an issue as is water usage. The boys are told that their pack should weigh no more than 1/3 their body weight (which allows yours truly a 200-pound pack...just kidding). Water, at 8 pounds a gallon, is usually limited to 2 quarts. We don't allow water filters (to pull water from a stream) just because I don't want the boys to get into a 'gear race'. When you delve into this area of cooking, things change: We're talking ingredients like Parmalat (sterilized milk), powdered whole eggs, dehydrated fried ground beef, etc. Techniques also: I've got a widget called a Bakepacker that's basically a grid I put into my backpack pot. Using a (I'm lazy) prepackaged muffin/cake recipe, I add dried milk if milk is called for, pack along a couple of packets of olive oil that I swiped from the local sandwich shop, put it in an oven roasting bag (the plastic kind), add water, the oil, smoosh it until it's mixed, then put into the Bakepacker to steam for 25 minutes. Simply grand on a cold winter morning. Tamales can be steamed in an open fire by wrapping them in a wet paper towel and putting in the coals. Awesome onion recipe (though boys don't like onions): Carve out some of the onion, drop a beef bouillion cube and a large pat of butter into the resulting hole, wrap in foil and put in the coals. Did you know a Porterhouse looks great when stuck onto a stick and held over a bed of coals? Or that you can boil Poptarts (leave them in the foil pouch, please). If paid enough money, I'll share the recipe for omelet-in-a-Baggie. Clean-up is an issue - boys don't clean, and with limited water, they have the perfect excuse. So, Gulletanians: Any good ideas? What do boys like? What should I try myself? (hint, hint). Shameless plug: Boy Scouts sell Trail's End popcorn as a fundraiser. It's the best microwave popcorn on the market, but stay away from the bagged stuff. Thanks.......
  13. After reading your piece (as reprinted in Best Food Writing 2002) "The Reviewer and the Recipe," I was struck that I view cookbooks in much the same way that you seem to; that is, I use them for inspiration rather than for the actual recipes. So I'm wondering if you have a suggestion for an Italian cookbook that someone (like me) with the same approach to cookbooks might enjoy. And more generally, aside from the books you mentioned in your "Annual Food Book Review" newsletter, what are some of your favorites (current or "classic")? And why? Thanks.
  14. Starkman

    Cooking with aluminum . . . bad?

    Hello all, I was wondering what the updated information out there is about cooking with (uncoated) aluminum. There was the theory that aluminum has been found to cause or increase alzheimer's disease. It's also been said that aluminum is toxic to the body (too much of it, at least). If you do cook with aluminum, do you use coated or straight aluminum? Thanks, Starkman
  15. I'm interested in collecting books that feature good recipes for home style dishes from around the world. I have a fairly extensive collection, ranging from fairly broad Eastern European and South American books to region-specific titles such as The Illustrated Cape Malay Cookbook and Catalan Cuisine. I'm missing some, tho', and I'm looking for recommendations to fill the gaps. I'd like recommendations for ... Nordic (I have Noma, of course, but I'm after the sort of food normal people cook at home and traditional dishes) Hawaii and other Pacific islands Caribbean (all I can find at the moment are the Levi Roots books--and I'm not sure if a series of books by a very rich musician with a side line in hot sauce is what I'm after) African (I have a few African books, actually, mostly South African, and most of them are shit) Polish Indigenous Australian Irish (looking at the Coleman Andrews one at the moment--thoughts?) US--beyond New Orleans/Cajun/Creole (already have a couple of good books on that), ideally including something about the Texan/Mexican border area Mongolian Arab (think Saudi Arabia/Kuwait/Yemen as opposed to Lebanon/Syria/Israel) Croat/Serb/Bosnian Belgian Dutch Chinese Islamic Macanese
  16. I have just bought 4oz of fresh Perigord Truffles and have a question about whether the truffles should be warmed to release their maximum flavour or simply shaved ontop of the dish. Two weeks ago I got ahold of a Burgundy Fall truffle and was struck by the fact that when we shaved it ontop of an omelet the flavour was not nearly as strong as when we made another omelet and rolled the shaved truffles inside. With the Perigord Truffles I plan to use them to make truffled mashed potatoes. I had planned on shaving them over the individual servings at the table but now I am wondering if it would be better to fold them into the potatoes before serving them.
  17. Has anyone used Walter's latest baking book and do you have an opinion on whether it is worth adding to an already extensive baking collection? Particularly interested in the yeasted bread sections--danish, etc. Thanks.
  18. A recent college graduate on a shoestring budget, my sister recently received a crock pot from our dear mum. I would like to supplement that gift with a decent crock pot cookbook. Are there any out there that are particularly user-friendly for a (very) unkitchen-friendly, lazy, and thrifty cook? Your help is appreciated.
  19. I just received a copy of Pichet Ong's Sweet Spot and see some interesting new ideas and formulas that I will have to try out. Last night I made the dragon devil's food cupcakes and they are amazing! Next time I will use less tea and more burbon in the ganache, otherwise, spot on. Does anyone else have this book? What are your thoughts? Dan
  20. Just picked up a copy of this neat new book at CostCo for $18, not expecting too much, but I must say, it's a really nice book! Nice production value, great photos, layout, organization. Hardcover, not too big, not too small. Short primers about each meat they cover, beef, pork, lamb, veal. Including a drawing of the animal indicating what's from where. No poultry and the veal chapter is the shortest with 12 recipes, but I'm still glad to see veal covered at all in a mass market book (published under the Williams-Sonoma brand), as I have to go to a specialty butcher to even buy veal. Maybe this is going to change? Sure would be nice. Each recipe has a little introduction, most have a "handwritten" note from a butcher explaining something. Clean layout, if there are things like pork and bbq sauce, each part has a headline in the ingredient list, the explanations are well done from what I read so far and easy to follow. Some really nice recipes as well! Recipes range from bbq over roasting to stews and pan fried, a nice mix of things. Now, if you have a bunch of meat books (ahem, like me) you probably don't need this (but might want it anyway, LOL), but it would certainly make a great gift or book for somebody expanding on what they do with meat. And all the bits and pieces of meat info thrown in are certainly worth reading, I always find something new in those things, even though I owm just about any book that has the title meat in it Check it out, lists at 29.95 but cheaper online or at CostCo right now, at least at ours here in Concord. Worth the money.
  21. OliverB

    Morimoto

    I just got this book yesterday and I must say, I'm quite intrigued by some (if not most) of the recipes. Does anybody here have this book, and if so, have you used it? I'm tentatively looking for that one book to cook myself all the way through (like the French Laundry, Alinea, etc blogs). From what I've read so far, I can get pretty much everything needed at local Asian markets. I'd be curious to hear from others that might have used this book already, as sometimes books read nicer than they actually work in the end... The book is thinner than I expected, but it's really a gorgeous publication with very good and appetizing photos. Lots of technique photos too with step by step instructions. While I really don't care for the "cooking" show Iron Chef at all, I must say that I'm very impressed by this book so far, and it at least appears that Morimoto was very involved in it's creation. Lots of personal little anecdotes just add to the fun of reading. Oliver PS: I did a search here and could not find a thread about this book, if there is one I'm sorry for starting a new one.
  22. can someone recommend one please? in english
  23. My copy of eGullet Society board member Paula Wolfert's Mediterranean Clay Pot Cooking arrived a few days ago. I know many members have been waiting for it as long as I have, especially those who helped Paula with her recipe testing. And it looks like it's more than worth the wait. A helpful clay pot primer on types of clay pots and how to season them starts off the book. Chapters follow on First Courses Soups Fish and Shellfish Chicken, Duck and Other Poultry Meats Pasta and Grains Vegetables and Beans Savory Pies and Breads Egg and Dairy dishes Desserts Has anyone else seen the book yet? What do you think?
  24. tehmeena

    Cookies Homemade

    This Recipe that I am going to share, its by my mom. We used to have these cookies since Childhood. To me its a very traditional Recipe. any flavors you want to add, all depending upon your taste. I used Chocolate, Vanilla and Raspberry for that. Same recipe goes for all cookies with distinct use of essences and food colors. Well here we go, it makes about 20 to 30 cookies, enough for your family while having tea/coffee. I love its crunchy texture outside and softy material of a classic cookie from inside. So for making a cookie you gonna have: COOKIES HOMEMADE: You will need: 1/2 cup unsalted Butter/clarified Butter 1 cup Sugar 2 Eggs 1 tsp Baking Powder Milk 1/4 cup(Use Milk as required, dough should be soft, add it if you feel stickiness) 2 1/2 cup Flour Vanilla Essence(or any flavor you like to have in cookies) Steps to Follow Beat Butter and Sugar. Add Sieved Flour & Baking Powder. Add flavor , Essence, Eggs, make a dough. Add some warm milk if you feel to have in your Dough. Make a soft dough. Then cutout soft cookies and Bake. This Recipe works for simple Vanilla Cookie. I filled my cookies with small pieces of Dark Chocolate. If you need some amendments or more flavors, add Cocoa Powder or Raspberry Essence with Red Food Color as I did.
  25. localherbavore

    D'Maore Knife Sharpening Book

    My chef posted on CIA's allumni site to see if anyone had an extra copy, but I will try here as well. It should look like a spiral-bound stack of papers, but I am looking for a copy of this. After several discussions of knife shapening techniques and philosophies I am intrigued to read this. If anyone can help, thank you in advance.
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