Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Cookbook'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Society Announcements
    • Announcements
    • Member News
    • Welcome Our New Members!
  • Society Support and Documentation Center
    • Member Agreement
    • Society Policies, Guidelines & Documents
  • The Kitchen
    • Beverages & Libations
    • Cookbooks & References
    • Cooking
    • Kitchen Consumer
    • Culinary Classifieds
    • Pastry & Baking
    • Ready to Eat
    • RecipeGullet
  • Culinary Culture
    • Food Media & Arts
    • Food Traditions & Culture
    • Restaurant Life
  • Regional Cuisine
    • United States
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • India, China, Japan, & Asia/Pacific
    • Middle East & Africa
    • Latin America
  • The Fridge
    • Q&A Fridge
    • Society Features
    • eG Spotlight Fridge

Product Groups

  • Donation Levels
  • Feature Add-Ons

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


LinkedIn Profile


Location

Found 955 results

  1. Slate article Marvelous article on the history leading up to today and describing some of the ways in which Gourmet Magazine has evolved. What a great read! And the cookbook is something I will definitely look at with an eye toward purchasing!
  2. Mallet

    Coco

    I just stumbled upon Coco at Chapters yesterday and couldn't resist picking it up. The premise is that 10 of the world's most famous chefs (Ferran Adrià, Alain Ducasse, Alice Waters, René Redzepi, Jacky Yu, Yoshihiro Murata, Fergus Henderson, Shannon Bennett, Mario Batali, and Gordon Ramsay) each select 10 chefs who they think are making important contributions to modern gastronomy. For each of the resulting 100 chefs, there is a short blurb by the "Master" who chose them about what aspect of their cooking is exciting, a brief bio, pictures, and a sample menu + recipes. The final result is a really cool snapshot of what is going on in some of the most exciting restaurants in the world today. Has anybody else seen/bought this book? Have you cooked from it yet? Here's an eGullet friendly link Coco
  3. david goodfellow

    Yes Chef.

    I returned a couple of cookery books to my local library and was thrilled to bits to find "Yes Chef" on the shelves. Its contains "100 Great British Recipes from 20 Great British Chefs", including, Marcus Waring, Jason Atherton, Michael Caines, Nathan Outlaw, Glynn Purnell, Mark Hix, Anthony Demetre, Tom Kitchin, etc,etc,etc. Most of the chefs are Michelin starred and I just can't wait to tackle some of the recipes. I deem myself to be fortunate enough to have dined at quite a few of their restaurants so its a real pleasure to recreate the style of cooking. A lot of them seem to be signature dishes and most of them are very do-able to a cook of my standing. From a personal point of view, I can without hesitation recommend this book.
  4. I have just bought 4oz of fresh Perigord Truffles and have a question about whether the truffles should be warmed to release their maximum flavour or simply shaved ontop of the dish. Two weeks ago I got ahold of a Burgundy Fall truffle and was struck by the fact that when we shaved it ontop of an omelet the flavour was not nearly as strong as when we made another omelet and rolled the shaved truffles inside. With the Perigord Truffles I plan to use them to make truffled mashed potatoes. I had planned on shaving them over the individual servings at the table but now I am wondering if it would be better to fold them into the potatoes before serving them.
  5. I received this book for christmas, having made some hints before. It is a monster book in coffe table format documenting the dishes in his three star flagship resturant in Royal Hospital Road, London. This is not "Gordon cooks at home" or something similar. This is a hardcore book that presents and explain the actual dishes served at the resturant. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Recipes-Star-Chef-...99651590&sr=8-3 (Note to editor: please feel free to eGullet-ize the link and/or add link to US Amazon) It only costs GBP 20, which is amazingly low considering the production values. The first half of the book is just photos of the various dishes and comments about them from (presumably) the man himself. The second half is the actual recipes. The presentation/photos of the dishes are absolutely stunning. Many of the dishes looks like work of art, especially in the pastry/desserts section. The recipes (at least some of them) actually looks doable, surprisingly enough. Only a very foolish or very experienced amateur cook would attempt to recreate an entire menu in a home kitchen, but borrowing a single dish (especially a main course) is definitely doable if you have reasonable experience and some time to devote. The recipes are very well written and some though has definitely gone into making them possible to execute in a home kitchen (no sous vide machinery...). My usual approach when attempting fine dining cooking is to simplify, like pair the protein and sauce in one dish with the (simpler) starch from somewhere else and/or remove some of the garnishes. This would work well with this book. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in fine dining. Either just as a documentation of dishes from one of the worlds top resturants or to actually try to cook from. Yesterdays Financial Times had an article where one of their writers tried to execute an entire three course menu from the book. To summarize, the main course was on the table three hours late, but the results were stunning. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/2d21f2b0-ba6b-11...?nclick_check=1 Note: I haven't yet tried any of the recipes (but I'm definitely eyeing that foie gras filled pidgeon breast roulade with confited pigeon legs...) and I like fine dining cook books, mostly for inspiration, sometimes for actual cooking.
  6. RobertCollins

    Good Meat by Deborah Krasner

    Good Meat by Deborah Krasner caught my eye this morning and so I looked thru it. It looks great and has my interest but before I shell out $40, I thought I'd see if anybody has an opinion.
  7. Sur La Table has entered the cookbook market, but instead of following Williams Sonoma's example of single subject books, they've come out with Things Cooks Love, (which is also the name of their new branded line of cooking gadgets -- I think it makes a better brand name than cookbook title, but maybe that's just me.) It's not surprising that much of the book seems to be dedicated to equipment. Not having seen the book itself, I can't say how useful it is, but it could be a good reference for the new cook. Likewise the "Global Kitchen" section, which is designed to give "comprehensive looks at the implements of global cuisines, detailed lists of essentials you’ll want in the pantry for a culinary tour, plus delicious recipes to put it all together." Regardless of the execution, it doesn't sound like something I'd get for myself, but I can see it being a nice gift if it's done well. Has anyone seen this?
  8. I am interested in knowing if any of you bakers out there have any or all of the following books by Ms. Beranbaum: The Cake Bible The Bread Bible The Pie and Pastry Bible I have read conflicting reviews of these books. A lot of people say the recipes are overly complicated and that if you are the tiniest bit off in your measuring, the end result will be a flop. Others think the books are the holy grail. As I am considering getting these books, I would appreciate your input. I am not a professional baker but I have a many years of baking experience. Thank you.
  9. stereoboard

    Est Est Est

    Hi ive been searching for Est Est Est by Donovan Cooke, its gone out of print but does anyone know where I can get a hold of a copy, same goes for Noma's first book in English, also just out of print. Would love your assistance
  10. easyguru

    Indian Cookbooks

    A common request is to suggest a Indian cookbook. This compilation of links has most of the discussion which has happened on this topic. http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=41944 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=38550 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=40426 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=40158 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=35639 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=29928 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=34831 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=13852 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=28196 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=23402 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=9910 http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=11649
  11. I am looking for cookbooks that feature recipes and cuisine from the Northern region of Italy. ( My ancestors originate from Torino. ) I am looking for 'light' or healthier versions of traditional northern Italian recipes. Any recommendations?
  12. I am trying to track down a somewhat old cookbook. it was put out by the sunmaid fruit company. its titled something along the lines of "sunmaid little raisin cookbook" but i'm not sure. What i am sure of is it has the best carrot cake recipe in it. I am in trouble for misplacing it in the move. My girlfriend loves that cake and book but more so the cake. She says its the only good carrot cake. So my fellow egulleters if anybody knows the book I am talking about or has it or even just the recipe for the carrot cake i would appreciate it if someone could help.
  13. Hi all, Does anyone have actual experience with preparing recipes out of Prudhomme's books? I have been pondering about buying his books Louisiana Tastes and Louisiana Kitchen but am afraid 90% of the recipes would call for buying his merchandise before proceeding in the style of "4 teaspoons of Chef Paul Prudhomme's Poultry Magic" or "buy crab boil - it should be available everywhere", which because I'm from overseas, neither are available in NZ. Do the 2 books advise methods to make spice mixtures from scratch? That will make things a lot easier for us overseas readers. Thanks
  14. I'm been interested in Latin American cooking lately. This has been prompted by watching Rick Bayless and enjoying a variety of really good food from the street food scene. I want to pick up several solid cookbooks and maybe some good books about ingredients. I'm more interested in traditional recipes/cooking methods. I'm a pretty good cook but I am new to cooking this type of food at home. I like to have books that include the following: *Cooking meats like al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, etc. *Soups and stews *Different types moles, salsas and other sauces *Empanadas *Pupusas *Tamales - love to learn the different types *Alfajores Thanks!
  15. Cookwithlove

    Alain Passard Book

    Could anyone keep me abreast of Alain Passard's latest development , whether he publish any latest book on his new love, "Vegetable"? merci
  16. wannabechef

    Pakistani Cookbooks?

    Hi, I'm interested in learning how to cook Pakistani/Indian food. I want a book that has relatively simple recipes and is for a beginner of this type of cuisine. The reason I say Pakistani and not Indian, is that I feel that I enjoy food in Pakistani restaurants generally more than Indian. I know they are similar in many ways, and even have many of the same dishes and ingredients, but I generally found the Pakistani versions to be spicer and generally more flavorful. I also would like to learn some good meat dishes and kebabs, and I know a lot of Indian books are more veg-centric. Does anyone have any suggestions? Thanks - WBC
  17. So, if I were to get only one cookbook by Madhur Jaffrey, which would I get? Sincerely, Dante
  18. swissmiss

    Cookbooks

    Thank you for your fascinating answers so far. I am also amazed by the photos on your website. Do you use/read cookbooks? If yes, which ones do you favor and why?
  19. I guess Suneeta has been working on her cookbook for upwards of 20 years. It is out now. I've done a bunch of recipes from it, and I know many of them from her cooking classes here in Houston. The book is excellent. I love the way the book is laid out, it is designed to make following the recipes fast and easy. There are three columns for each recipe, the left column has the measures listed in English units, the center column lists the ingredients, and the right column has the measures listed in metric units. The cooking instructions are excellent. The headnotes consist of information on the dish and tips for the dish. This is a cookbook by a teacher who knows how to put a recipe together. Here's the beauty of the book, by way of example. How many times have you seen a cookbook recipe that calls for, say, "1 onion chopped"? What size onion would that be, exactly? Here in Texas an onion can be pretty bid. In Europe, they aren't as big. What Suneeta has done is demystify the list of ingredients by using measures of cups, teaspoons, and tablespoons, or, metric weights. This is awesome! It makes the recipes foolproof. And it gives you a baseline for later changing the recipe up to suit personal tastes. I own 5 Indian cookbooks, and I have read quite a few more. But this is the one that I will default to. This book should be in every cook's collection. It is that good. I would recommend starting with the following: Chicken in Cashew Saffron Gravy North Indian Lamb Curry on Bread Whole Baked Masala Cauliflower Bell Peppers with Roasted Chickpea Flour Dhokla (a fast and easy recipe using cream of wheat that produces beautiful results) Split Yellow Peas with Tamarind Chutney Gena's Kababs (flavored with green onions, ginger, cilantro, crisp fried onions)
  20. What do you guys do when you buy a new book? Read through for ideas? Make one or two recipes? Cook your way through it (in any meaning of the phrase)? Just to add to the discussion, I have... ten, including a gem from the feminist '70s called "The Political Palate".
  21. hillvalley

    Her First Cookbook

    My sister just discovered cooking last week. So far she has made stir fry and tried her own tomato sauce, which she burned. She has announced to our family that I am allowed to buy her one cookbook for Channukah and that is it. My question is, which book should it be? I am looking for a basic cookbook and am leaning towards Joy of Cooking. She needs a book that has the basics, like how to cook a potato, but has room to expand, should she feel so inclined. Thoughts, suggestions?
  22. Janice Wong is the chef and owner of 2am Dessert Bar in Singapore, one of the few dessert restaurants in the world. This is her first book, and involves on her plated desserts. Visually it's great, the packaging and photos are stunning. I haven't tried any recipes, but after reading some they seem consistent. My main complaint is that this book has few dishes (about 30), it has about 120 pages, and a good amount are occupied by full 2 pages photos. So overall this book is on the pricey side (about 55 US$ plus shipping), but I'm happy to have bought it. As far as I know you can buy it only through the official website: http://perfectioninimperfection.com/ and until now it went under the radar of all the press. Teo
  23. Not only would I buy an egullet cookbook, I would contribute to it being made!! Did anyone ever think of having our own egullet cookbook? Maybe a ring folder type that can be added to on a yearly basis...I wish there was such a one.
  24. currypuff

    Vegan baking books

    I'd like to cut back on dairy... but one of my big problems is cutting butter and milk/cream out of my diet, ESPECIALLY baked goods. Does anyone have suggestions for baking books that have reasonably tasty recipes using moderately easy to find and not overly expensive ingredients? I don't want to have to go out and buy a whole whack of fancy ingredients over and above what I stock in my regular pantry for baking. I've looked on amazon and there do seem to be a few good ones.... Also, does anyone have a coconut macaroon recipe that doesn't involve egg whites?
  25. maggiethecat

    Cooking With Yogurt

    I bought a yogurt maker via Amazon the other day -- a cheap Salton jobbie that's really nothing but a warm womb to keep the mixture at temperature. (Many years ago, I wrapped the mixture in a bath towel and placed it on a steam radiator, but I'm lazier now than I was as a novice cook.) I spent the twenty bucks on the machine because I was cross at the price of yog, and the process has always seemed like magic to me. So: I can make a quart of yogurt a day, no sweat. But what to do with it, beyond the crunchy breakfasts, the tandoories, the cheese (love that!) the Jacques Pepin cake? The dips, the salad dressings, etc. It's good, it's easy, it's versatile, it's cheap. Care to share how you cook with yog?
×