Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Confections'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Society Announcements
    • Announcements
    • Member News
    • Welcome Our New Members!
  • Society Support and Documentation Center
    • Member Agreement
    • Society Policies, Guidelines & Documents
  • The Kitchen
    • Beverages & Libations
    • Cookbooks & References
    • Cooking
    • Kitchen Consumer
    • Culinary Classifieds
    • Pastry & Baking
    • Ready to Eat
    • RecipeGullet
  • Culinary Culture
    • Food Media & Arts
    • Food Traditions & Culture
    • Restaurant Life
  • Regional Cuisine
    • United States
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • India, China, Japan, & Asia/Pacific
    • Middle East & Africa
    • Latin America
  • The Fridge
    • Q&A Fridge
    • Society Features
    • eG Spotlight Fridge

Product Groups

  • Donation Levels
  • Feature Add-Ons

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


LinkedIn Profile


Location

  1. So Valronha's Blonde Chocolate seems to be a huge hit, but it is pretty expensive and it's very sweet. I wonder if this can be made from "scratch" with cocoa butter, toasted milk powder and sugar (but a bit less). I've found some recipes for plain white chocolate online and it looks simple, but is it really? Has anyone made their own white chocolate? Would love to hear about it if you have and whether you'd do it again (oh, and whether it saved you any money!). Thanks!
  2. Host's note: this is a continuation of the ever-popular Confections! topic; the previous segment is here: Confections! What did we make? (2012 – 2014) Here's something I did yesterday, peanut butter chocolate bars.
  3. In the April issue of the Oprah magazine Gayle King mentions getting some merveilleux, a pastry she had never heard of before. Neither had I, so Bing to the rescue I had hoped, but all I really found out was its a meringue and whipped cream concoction. Has anyone heard of this? Any links for recipes? Is it as wonderful tasting as it sounds?
  4. I just received from the US the book Bachour. It brings plated desserts to a imaginable level with plenty of different recipes and ideas to use and modify. I think it's a great debut for the author and for one who wants to practice or learn gastronomic plated desserts.
  5. Has anybody made the orange raspberry bon bon from Notter's book "The Art of the Chocolatier: From Classic Confections to Sensational Showpieces"? It is described as a smooth raspberry coulis, atop a dark ganache, infused with fresh orange juice, encased in a dark chocolate shell. What did you think of it? I'm very curious about the texture and taste of the raspberry coulis. Unfortunately the book shows a picture on the finished piece (no step-by-step photos or a cut-away photo).
  6. Has anyone seen this book yet? If so, do you have any comments about it you can share? The Praline
  7. A mistake was made with my Albert Uster order this week and I received it twice. Since it's shipped from CA, doesn't go bad, and I'll use it eventually, I'm not going to mess with trying to return the second delivery. But now I have a huge amount of inventory so I thought I'd see if anyone here was looking for Felchlin by the bag. Each bag is 2kg (4# 7oz) in the following varieties and prices: Maracaibo Creole 49%, $48 Sao Palme 60%, $30 Arriba 72%, $46 As for shipping, I can fit 2 bags in a medium flat rate box for $14 or 3 bags in a large box for $19 to go anywhere in the USA. If you'd like some, PM me with your selection, email, and shipping address. I'll invoice you via Square and you can pay securely online with a credit card. Thanks for reading!
  8. I want to put a soft marshmallow fluff into a bonbon. I’ve made this recipe lots of times for my s’mores macarons and it’s great but the recipe says it will only keep 2 weeks in the fridge (but it is actually fine much longer—at least no one in my family has died yet ). https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.chowhound.com/recipes/homemade-marshmallow-creme-30296/amp Does anyone know of a soft marshmallow cream recipe I can pipe into a bonbon and leave at room temp for a couple of weeks? I know the commercial stuff will separate long before it goes bad (don’t ask ).
  9. THE BOOKS ARE SOLD I have Volumes 1 ,2 and 4 of Jean-Pierre Wybauw's Great Chocolate books are for sale. The books are in great shape! There is some tape on the corner of the front of volume 1 that I used to keep it together after a drop. Volume 1 is also autographed by the author (See pics below). I'm asking $150 for the lot OBO. Let me know if interested or if you have questions
  10. Does anyone know of a natural alternative to using potassium sorbate as a marshmallow preservative??? Would citric acid or sorbitol suffice???
  11. Does anyone know of a source for a vegan confectioner's glaze suitable for sugar/chocolate panning (for sealing the candies from the Evils of the Outside World)? I have a couple of friends who are vegan or vegetarian, and I'd like to avoid being a total jerk if I can help it ("Look at these tasty treats I made THAT YOU CAN'T EAT!! MWAHAHA!!"). I need small quantities, as this is just for occasional home use.
  12. Is anyone here familiar with Pomati chocolate machines? Kerekes has this tabletop model http://www.bakedeco.com/detail.asp?id=32951 only 5kg but could be a good step up from hand tempering as I grow my company. They also have larger floor models. Alternately, if there is anyone near Seattle, Portland OR, or Vancouver BC who would be willing to show me your chocolate kitchen and tempering machine, I'd love to come for a visit!
  13. My 7 year old daughter was diagnosed with Fructose Malabsorption Disorder in August, after six years of terrible digestive trouble. Now she's doing very much better on a low-fructose diet, but she misses all her favorite treats. She can tolerate glucose/dextrose, aspartame (nutrasweet), saccharin, and up to a tablespoon of sucrose (cane sugar) per day max -- in practice we try to give her almost none. We've been bumping along without sweet things, but when I asked her what she wanted for Christmas, tears welled up in her eyes and she said "I want to be able to eat candy again." I'm not made of stone. My heart just broke. I want to help her out as much as I can, which means learning how to make candy with dextrose/glucose/corn syrup and as little cane sugar as possible. I have made candy occasionally in the past, and I'm a reasonably good and adventurous cook -- I make my own salami, that sort of thing -- so I feel like this is something I can tackle if I have good resources. Which resources, though? I know that dextrose/glucose, while still a natural sugar, has very different structural and chemical properties than sucrose/cane sugar, but I don't know HOW they're different. Is hard candy out of the question? What about fudge, or caramels? What are the hard and soft ball stage temperatures?? Does glucose even HAVE a soft or hard ball stage? Are there resources, either online or in print, where I can learn more about this? Would I look at regular candymaking, or some molecular gastronomy whatnot, or. . .?
  14. Im surprised no one has mentioned these Japanese Do It Yourself Snack Kits, from Kracie brand They are called Poppin Cookin' or Happy Kitchen. They are little snacks you make yourself like Waffles, Fast Food Happy Meal (w/Cola), Cakes, Ramen Noodles, Curry Rice etc Some, even involve Spherification... You can buy them on eBay, Amazon, JList etc. Here are a few videos, Happy Meal Waffles Ramen Cake Sushi W/Spherification aspects
  15. Hello All! I am new to the eGullet community, here to pose my first question: I really enjoy the look of handmade plaques to decorate dipped chocolates (I have posted an example picture below, but for reference Thomas Haas and Theo Chocolates use such decorations). Yes, they are time consuming and probably not worth the effort on a grand scale, but for small batch production I think they are a beautiful detail. I have been cutting the little squares by hand, which takes a dreadfully long time. I am considering a caramel cutter – one like a rolling pin with a bunch of cutting disks attached. Has anyone tried this? Do you have a certain time-saving technique that you like to use? I’d love to glean from your wisdom, if you have some to share. My apologies if this topic has been discussed elsewhere already. I tried searching the forums, but it did not yield the results I was looking for.
  16. I am a newer member of eG Forums and would like to thank the organizers and members for this amazing web-site. It's very educational and enjoyable! I've been making caramels at home for about a year, and have been running into problems with delayed crystallization. I have been using Recchiuti's Fleur de Sel recipe from his 'Chocolate Obsession' book which uses the dry technique for making caramels. My caramels start graining up about a week out, despite being enrobed in chocolate and stored in a sealed container to hopefully limit moisture attraction. I'm wondering if there isn't enough 'doctoring agent' in this recipe? Here is my current recipe: 5 drops Lemon Juice 298 g Sugar 1/2 Vanilla Bean 232 g (1 cup) whipping cream 38 g light corn syrup 14 g 82% Butter 1/2 tsp fleur de sel +/- toasted cashews Are there any general guidelines for the ratio of corn syrup to sugar? If I do increase the corn syrup and decrease the sugar by equal amounts, will this affect the texture of the caramels. Could the cashews be contributing to the crystallization too? Thanks in advance for your suggestions. Burny
  17. Here's a question for you confection gurus. I'm aware that at high altitudes, the temperature at which water boils is reduced (for example, at 3,000 meters, where I live, water boils at 89.8 C.) Does sugar behave the same way: to wit, do I have to calculate a much lower temperature than I'm used to for firm-ball syrup? If so, do I use the same ratios I'd use to compute water boiling time to figure out what my new temperature is? I ask because my syrups have been cracking out well below the temperatures I'm used to using, but if I'm overshooting by tens of degrees I wouldn't be surprised by that.... Otherwise, I'm not sure what's causing it - my instruments are all spotless and without the kind of flaws that would normally cause this kind of behaviour, and neither the sugar I use (98% sucrose from the San Carlos mills in Guayas) nor the water (distilled) has changed. Thanks in advance. (edited to fix a non-sequitur)
  18. I was browsing through some confectionery books on Amazon and was excited to see a new book coming out with Peter Greweling - Chocolates and Confections at Home with the Culinary Institute of America. http://www.amazon.ca/Chocolates-Confections-Culinary-Institute-America/dp/0470189576/ref=sr_1_17?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1256174107&sr=1-17 Finally something to put on my wish list!
  19. hey friends everyone getting excited for the holidays? first halloween...not too exciting, but a chance to do some scary desserts, then thanksgiving (pumpkin? cranberry? raisins and cinnamon? gosh...we could have so much fun!) then christmas, and we all are getting a bit crazy and worried about the christmas rush (or is that just me?) before i can enjoy the holidays though, i have the task of creating a classic chocolate truffle. known as a french truffle maybe? (just what i've heard) my dad is hosting a "vintage" party for some out-of-state biz clients and thought chocolate dipped dried fruit and ginger and some of those rustic, super creamy, cocoa covered balls of ganache would be perfect. problem is, i don't ever make handrolled truffles. i do molded chocolates (more fluid ganache) and some hand cut and dipped chocolates, make ganache, slab, cure and cut, which obviously are a bit firmer. so i didnt know if anyone had any tips, tricks or recipe and ratio ideas for this type of chocolate treat? i use the e.guittard rouge cocoa powder, and thought that maybe if i slab ganache and cut, THEN roll, they would be more equally sized? and then hand roll them around in some tempered (or untempered?!) chocolate, then that goes directly into a pan of cocoa powder, roll around and shake off excess in mesh strainer? should that be tempered or untempered chocolate you think? and i want more than just chocolatey goodness in this truffle...always thought these guys had an alcohol spike in them? whiskey? brandy? maybe that apple calvados? (anyone used this?) or pear williams? but nothing that would make someone spit it out...just enough to go...huh...what's that? mmm....lovely *trust me, i have had one of those alcohol spit them out type chocolates...and i LOVE alcohol* (wait, that came out wrong...) anyway, just hoping for a memorable chocolate, something with flavor, and firm enough to roll and hold shape (not sure for ratios on this), but soft enough to almost literally melt in your mouth.....thoughts? also, side note, dad wanted to know if these were rolled in cocoa powder, could we "glue" a tiny chocolate decoration to the top? or would the chocolate not stick to the cocoa powder surface? (he wanted to personalize with chocolate biz logo, i have it on some transfers for him that i made) thanks you guys!
  20. I often get requests for my chocolates from Europe and even a few from the U.S. Lately I have a request for a nice ongoing bulk order to Europe- to a tea house. I have no idea how to even begin the logistics. Does anyone do this? Is anyone willing to offer tips, refer me to places,or make suggestions?
  21. After the success of the 2009 eGullet Confectionery Workshop arranged by Kerry Beal, I've taken on the challenge to organize the 2nd of these events tentatively scheduled for April 16 - 18, 2010 to be held in Gaithersburg, Maryland outside of Washington, DC. Click here for the terms under which this event is listed in eG Forums. This topic will be used to track interest from all who would like to participate, "register" those of us who will be in attendance, and collaborate on developing the agenda. First: The location. I've gained commitment to use the facilities of my culinary alma mater, L'Academie de Cuisine (LAC), in Gaithersburg, MD. We will have use of one kitchen and the adjoining "classroom" for the two days of Saturday April 17 and Sunday April 18. Immediately next door, to LAC is Albert Uster Imports (AUI), a large chocolate importer and pastry supply house. I've spoken with the Corporate Pastry Chef, Anil Rohira, who is a world class pastry chef, chocolatier, and sugar artist. Anil has tentatively agreed to host us for about 1/2 day on Friday April 16 for a demonstration and discussion on a topic as yet to-be-determined. I believe we can reasonably accommodate between 20 - 25 people at this event. It is open to all, regardless of skill level or experience. It is my hope that like the 2009 event, we will have a broad range of skills represented so that those more experienced can teach/mentor others, and that we will all learn something from each other. COST As with all things, we need to pay for facilities, supplies, breakfast/lunch, etc. Tentatively, I have set a price point of $150 per participant which at the moment seems like it will cover all we need. For now this is only an ESTIMATE, but I think it's a reasonable one. As we get closer toward the end of the year, I'll being collecting names of those who would like to attend. Several hotels are near the school and I'll look to setup a group rate once I have the dates finalized with LAC. I would like to invite you to begin the conversation with a discussion of WHAT would you like to DO during this weekend? What items would you like to see on our agenda? Speak up! Let's have some fun! HOST'S NOTE: This is an member-organized event, not an official eGullet Society event. Please see here for the terms under which this event is listed in eG Forums.
  22. I have established this topic to being the planning for the 2nd (hopefully) annual eG Candy & Confectionery Conference. The first event organized by KerryBeal et. al. was a great success and now it is time to start thinking about next year. THIS EVENT HAS BEEN ORGANIZED THROUGH EG FORUMS BY MEMBERS BUT IS NOT SPONSORED BY THE EGULLET SOCIETY FOR CULINARY ARTS AND LETTERS OR EG FORUMS. YOUR PARTICIPATION IN ANY EVENT OR ACTIVITY ARRANGED ON OR DISCUSSED IN EG FORUMS IS AT YOUR SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE RISK. BY USING AND PARTICIPATING IN THE FORUMS YOU AGREE AND UNDERSTAND (1) THAT IN CONNECTION WITH YOUR PARTICIPATION IN ANY EVENT OR ACTIVITY, YOU MAY BE EXPOSED TO A VARIETY OF HAZARDS AND RISKS ARISING FROM THOSE ACTIVITIES AND EVENTS; (2) TO THE FULLEST EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW, YOU AGREE TO WAIVE, DISCHARGE CLAIMS, RELEASE, INDEMNIFY AND HOLD HARMLESS THE SOCIETY, ITS AFFILIATES, OFFICERS, DIRECTORS, AGENTS, AND OTHER PARTNERS AND EMPLOYEES, FROM ANY AND ALL LIABILITY ON ACCOUNT OF, OR IN ANY WAY RESULTING FROM INJURIES AND DAMAGES IN ANY WAY CONNECTED WITH ANY SUCH EVENTS OR ACTIVITIES. YOU AGREE AND UNDERSTAND THAT THESE TERMS WILL BE BINDING UPON YOU AND YOUR HEIRS, EXECUTORS, AGENTS, ADMINISTRATORS AND ASSIGNS, AS WELL AS ANY GUESTS AND MINORS ACCOMPANYING YOU AT THE EVENTS.
  23. I have been making macarons for a few years now, and have been making LOTS of macarons lately for my new baking business, and what occurred tonight is a first for me. When baking off my trays tonight, I'm getting meringue cookies (no glossy hard top, no foot) instead of macaron shells. I baked off several dozen earlier today with no problems, so I don't think it's an issue of the weather -- but it's been dry. The texture of the (freshly made) batter was as usual, as was my oven temp. The formula is one I've used many times before, with success. I weigh my ingredients carefully. What the heck did I do wrong, and how can I prevent it from happening again?!
  24. Is anyone attending the March 22 class at the French Pastry School (Chicago) being taught by JP Wybauw. I'm going and would enjoy meeting up with fellow eGullet contributors. HOST'S NOTE: Click here for the terms under which this is listed on the eG Forums.
  25. I've been using the Cacao Noel brand of chocolate for about a year and really like working with the semisweet and bittersweet chocolate for molding, as well as for dipping pieces into. Today I'm working on a customer's order for white chocolate shells on her wedding cake, and am having trouble with the white chocolate. It's like working with chocolate chips! No matter whether I temper by hand or in my machine, the chocolate is so thick (viscous?) that it won't melt and become fluid. I've added cocoa butter to the batch I'm hand tempering, which has helped temendously. Has anyone else had this problem with Noel white chocolate? I don't want to invest any more money in Noel white chocolate if it's a known issue. Or - have I just gotten a fluke box that may not have been stored properly? The best before date is 07/2010. Thanks!
×
×
  • Create New...