Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Condiments'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Society Announcements
    • Announcements
    • Member News
    • Welcome Our New Members!
  • Society Support and Documentation Center
    • Member Agreement
    • Society Policies, Guidelines & Documents
  • The Kitchen
    • Beverages & Libations
    • Cookbooks & References
    • Cooking
    • Kitchen Consumer
    • Culinary Classifieds
    • Pastry & Baking
    • Ready to Eat
    • RecipeGullet
  • Culinary Culture
    • Food Media & Arts
    • Food Traditions & Culture
    • Restaurant Life
  • Regional Cuisine
    • United States
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • India, China, Japan, & Asia/Pacific
    • Middle East & Africa
    • Latin America
  • The Fridge

Product Groups

  • Donation Levels
  • Feature Add-Ons

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


LinkedIn Profile


Location

Found 568 results

  1. They are mostly in CA (no surprise, I guess) but many other states seem to have a few. http://www.jambajuice.com/what/index.html I'm curious what others think of them; I've never seen anyone mention them on eGullet. In my opinion, these are the perfect food for after a hike-fluid, carbs, and cold. My previous favorite post-hike snacks have been Scharffenberger bittersweet chocolate & ice water; a homemade chocolate chip-oatmeal cookie; an It's-It; or an In-n-Out chocolate milkshake. I actually like these better than any of my previous chocolate treats!!! I'm slowly but surely finding all of the nearest locations to each of our local parks. My favorite flavor is Orange-a-Peel,but I also like the cranberry one, Razzamataz, and the two w/ passion fruit in them. The mango one isn't too bad, either. I get the Femme boost.
  2. I was in my local wine store today and decided to pick up some Scotch. I was in two or three minds about what to get until someone went in the back and pressed the above bottle into my hand. It appears to be a house blend from the well known London spirits merchants, though their Web site gives no hint this even exists. It tastes its age, costs all of $30 and it's bloody good. Has anyone else come across this before? Perhaps it's a U.S.-only bottling?
  3. article from the Scotsman UK Seems he is quite innovative .. from his taking on the British school meals to smoking bans ....More to the cheeky lad than originally met the eye it seems .... and other notables have paid attention to him in a variety of ways. Quite a "loverly" article, if I do say so myself!
  4. I have been invited to a Cinco de Mayo party and asked to bring an appetizer for 6. I don't think it has to be Mexican, but I would like to bring something either Mexican or Southwestern in flavor or spirit (or at least South of the border). I don't want to bring salsas or guacamole or anything so predictable. Most of the interesting things I can think of need last minute attention, like fritters or gorditas etc. I like the idea of a shrimp seviche, but it looks messy to eat standing up. Any ideas on presenting a seviche for a cocktail-type party are welcome. I would like something that could be served room temperature and be prepared in advance. It doesn't have to be "authentic," just taste great and suitably impress . Also, I don't have time to experiment. I would like something you have made before. Too much to ask?
  5. I finally dived into the wonderful world of making homemade ketchup. Everything was going fine until I hit "spices" on the label. I've been eating tubfuls of this stuff for decades and I've never been able to detect any particular spice notes. Any ideas?
  6. Never do I buy ANYTHING because it is endorsed by someone famous (at least not consciously), but my friend got Jamie Oliver's T-fal stuff and I liked the hefty weight. I haven't used them so I'm not sure how they perform. What are your thoughts? I've always gotten my cookware from resturant supply houses because I refused to spend the money for a name. I used another friends All-Clad Copper Core sauteuse and I was amazed at how well it performed. I guess for 350 bucks it better!!. Jamie/T-fal is very reasonably priced and it's my 40th B'day on Monday so my DW wants to buy me a set.
  7. Made lamb curry the other night, using Jaz's recipe. After seeing the price of Major Grey's chutney, I decided to make my own : bought about $8 worth of mangos, some golden raisins and spices. I made over a quart for about $10. And it was really , really easy and tasted great! Anyone else make chutney regularly, and if so, what kinds?
  8. My dad called and wants a recipe for eggless mayo -- I am not sure how to make it. I found some stuff on google with soy milk.. does not look appetizing at all. He can use regular milk if needed .. just does not want to use eggs.... any suggestions.. Also if this has already been covered here somewhere please just send me the link.. I tried a search but could not find anything thanks
  9. Jamie Oliver restaurant snubs Clinton Even being a former president of the United States isn't enough to guarantee a table at Jamie Oliver's landmark London restaurant Fifteen, it appears. Bill Clinton was reportedly turned away from the television chef's restaurant because it was full and staff refused to bump other patrons with a booking. Fifteen, which is staffed by rookie chefs recruited and trained by Oliver in the television program Jamie's Kitchen, is so popular diners have to book three months in advance. The former US president wanted to visit the restaurant during a recent visit to London and a staff member rang Fifteen on a Thursday, seeking a booking for the following Saturday night. "It was impossible because that's the restaurant's busiest night," an unnamed staff member told British newspaper The Daily Mirror. "It would have meant cancelling a booking of other guests who made reservations weeks ago and that just wouldn't be fair. "If we're full we're full, and there's nothing that can be done about it - even if it is for the former president of the United States." Fifteen is booked out at night until 2004. A spokesman for Oliver confirmed that Clinton had been turned away. "Jamie was sorry the restaurant was unable to accommodate Mr Clinton, but his attitude was c'est la vie," he said. "Mr Clinton is of course more than welcome to come back at any time but he will have to give the restaurant a bit more notice." http://news.ninemsn.com.au/Entertainment/s...story_51809.asp
  10. Hello, I am curious about what experience others may have using mustard seed oil. In Canada, by law mustard seed oil must be sold with the label "for external use only". I have spoken to members of the East Indian community in Winnipeg (who describe themselves in that way to differentiate themselves from First Canadians who call themselves Indians) and I have been told that they use it with no ill effects. I realize that this oil has been used for a millenia, but in modern times, has use of it been discouraged in any other communities? Thanks! Rick
  11. I know you do not need to refrigerate the full bone but I have a quarter pound of slices and it feels weird to leave it out. Is it ok to keep it in the fridge? Thanks.
  12. Can anybody recommend any good books for chutney/relish making? Preferably something that's available in the UK - but open to looking elsewhere. Many Thanks Darryl.
  13. As many of you know, I'm a big supporter of the Las Vegas dining scene. Earlier this year I wrote a lengthy report on my experiences at the "Vegas Uncork'd" events sponsored by Bon Appetit Magazine. In October, the James Beard Foundation is coming to Las Vegas to host the "Taste America" events. It's an exciting opportunity for Las Vegas to be the host city of such an impressive culinary event--and another feather in the cap of the city's chefs and restaurant community. You can check out the calendar of events at; http://www.jbftasteamerica.com/home I'm looking forward to it and I'll be doing a full photo report for everyone. If you happen to be coming to Las Vegas for the events, let me know.
  14. The sequence of posts that began at No. 71 in johnnyd's foodblog got me to thinking: Condiments are the culinary equivalent of kudzu. Or maybe they breed like rabbits. In any case, give 'em enough room and time, and eventually, they take over all the available shelf space in your pantry. I figure the process works something like this: You're about to make a dish that requires a certain type of condiment sauce, oil, or vinegar. You go out to the store to buy a bottle. Of course, the recipe doesn't require the entire bottle, so what's left goes on your shelf. Some time later, you're out shopping when something new or unusual catches your eye on a shelf somewhere. You think to yourself, "Hmmm, I'd like to try this and see what it tastes like." Into your cart and onto your shelf it goes, there to await its star turn. On your birthday, or on Christmahaunkwanzaakah, someone--a friend, relative, or co-worker--buys you a bottle of an exotic __________, knowing that you are particularly fond of sauces of this type. You thank the giver profusely and sock it away, making a mental note to be sure (never) to invite him over for dinner (sometime in the future). Before you know it, you're like me (and H.J. Heinz)--you have 57 varieties of oils and sauces of varying kinds, including multiple varieties of vinegars, mustards, salsas, marinades, oils and hot sauces, and maybe even more than one variety of ketchup (in addition to Heinz, I have a bottle of La Niña Spicy Ketchup I bought three weeks ago), scattered throughout your pantry and fridge. I'm only presenting my census data in the aggregate: 14 hot sauces, including 5 habanero sauces, one Louisiana-type, one cayenne sauce, two Huy Fong sauces (sriracha and chili garlic) and two varieties of Tabasco (but not the original--I need to restock it) 7 oils, including the basic cooking oils (canola, soybean) and the buttery-flavored canola oil for popping popcorn 6 vinegars, including 3 rice vinegars 5 types of mustard, one mixed with mayo 3 soy sauces, counting teriyaki as a soy sauce 3 marinades 2 sweet chili sauces -- one American, one Asian 2 bottled salad dressings, one left by a guest who brought a tossed salad to a dinner 2 pancake syrups, one "lite" 2 barbecue sauces 2 steak sauces (Heinz 57 and A1) 2 varieties of ketchup 1 jar of salsa 1 jar of mayonnaise (Hellman's, natch) 1 jar of hoisin sauce 1 bottle of fish sauce 1 bottle of Worcestershire sauce 1 chutney Angostura bitters Top this, why don'tcha? I'm sure some of you can.
  15. Okay, here is what we had: Moutarde Violette (recette Charentaise) Nice mellow mustard that would be tasty with crackers and cheese. The sweetness of the wine mellows out the mustard seed really well. Moutard de Truffe (Tubissime) OMG, that is not okay! Two tastes that came together as something you would shoot at a fancy fraternity party, as a dare. Moutard au Miel (Champ's) Yummy, a discernible amount of honey created a delicious classic pairing. (While I didn't have time to bring it, the honey mustard from Les Abilles is amazing. It features a spike of horseradish that gives it another dimension). Moutard de Picard (Champ's) I felt the cider didn't add anything to the taste. The flavor was as if plain whole grain had cider vinegar dumped into the batch. Moutard au Vin Charentais Nice whole grain look, but tasted of dust and cider. Verjus et Miel (Maille) Nothing special, tasted of your basic brown mustard. Horshradish (Maille) I LOVE horseradish and assumed I would love this mustard. Unfortunately this mustard tasted nothing of the bite or tang of horseradish and instead offered only little pickled nuggets of the root. Forte de Dijon (Monoprix) The strongest of the Dijons. A bit too powerful for most applications. Unless of course you want to clear your sinuses instantly. French's ballpark Oh French's, this instantly takes me back to pulling those nasty encrusted udders at Fenway. How can I say anything bad about something so charged with good memories. French's Dijon So either this one had gone bad, or just IS really bad. Tastes of flour and flowers, with hints of cardboard thrown in. The texture was pasty to boot. Moutarde de Dijon (Champ's) Classic Dijon taste without being overwhelming like the one from Monoprix. Moutarde de Meaux (Pommery) Big bits of whole grain but with a smooth taste that develops in the mouth. Hints of Champagne left a nice finish that felt as though it would cut through a fatty steak really well. For me the best of the lot were the Champ's au Miel and Dijon, both of which represented the best of their respective genres. My other favorite was the moutarde de Meaux which was both original and delicious. The French's Dijon and the moutarde de Truffe should be labeled as "not meant for consumption". The French's ballpark gets high scores for nostalgia. Here is a link to the labels and the pretzels: Mustard Gallery
  16. Guss's pickles in the Lower East Side (the place with the barrels on the sidewalk) is fighting United Pickle for the rights to the Guss's name. New York Times
  17. As has been widely reported in the Vancouver media James Barber passed away at his home in Vancouver Island a few days ago. I wanted to pay tribute to the man as he is one of the giants on the food scene in Vancouver and as often happens to those who live a long life their accomplishments can tend to fade from memory. There is so much more to James then Money's Mushrooms or the Urban Peasant. I won't pretend to give a bio on his life as I have not been acquainted with his professional career for that long but I first became aware of his talent when I moved to Vancouver in the mid 80's. At the time he was writing the restaurant column for the Georgia Straight (for which he won national awards) and his weekly offerings were nothing short of brilliant as he combined a lovely turn of phrase with hands down the most informed food knowledge of the era. It was a pleasure to discover little out of the way ethnic restaurants that were described in loving detail and with obvious knowledge of the cuisines. This was in stark contrast to the pompous and mainstream food reporting of the time. What has struck me most about James as I've crossed his path over the years in some Asian market, charity auction or restaurant is his pure and unadulterated love of all things food and wine. He really was the foodie's foodie. He would talk to anyone who approached him with a question about food or restaurants with unbridled enthusiasm and an absolute lack of ego (so refreshing and rare). I ran into him one day on the street a few years back and he hauled me over to his car to show me this brand new gadget he had found at Lee Valley. It was one of the very first Micro Plane graters. He pulled out a lemon and started zesting away with real excitement at his find. His success in later years (at a time when most of us would have been in a rest home) with his Urban Peasant tv show, his columns in Van Mag, a new cookbook (along with his tireless support of many good causes) is a nice cap to a well lived life. My condolences to his wife (and fellow food and wine expert) Christina Burridge .
  18. Yesterday I had the always renewed pleasure of waiting in line for nearly half an hour at my local Poste to ship a package to a friend in Atlanta, GA. Inside: 3 jars of mustard. Weight of package: a hair over 2kg. The post office woman asked me what I was sending in my package and when I said, "De la moutarde," she looked at me and shook her head. Oh, no, that won't do. You can't send alimentary products to the U.S. People get their packages opened and pulled apart. She took out a book of rules in different countries and flipped through it until she found the U.S. Yes, indeed, I needed to declare my package to the FDA and get a waiver to send it on, which would then be affixed to my package and everything could go smoothly. This seemed utterly absurd to me! We're not talking about produce or meat or anything remotely dangerous, but jars (sterilized obviously by their maker - these are purchased jars of mustard available in stores) of ground mustard seed, vinegar, etc. So now I have my carefully packed package on the counter in my hallway. I don't want to let down my mustard-loving friend, but the idea of going through all the hoops seems silly. Does anyone else have experience sending food items through the Poste (or via some other means; because as a side remark, she told me that as my package was over 2kg it had to be send by Colissimo blablabla, some higher-up level of shipping, and would cost 37.50 € - which also kind of stinks...).
  19. Kudos to Chef Celina Tio, of The American Restaurant, for being named the James Beard Foundation's Best Chef of the Midwest.
  20. Just read that marco pierre white doesn't think that jaime oliver is a "real" chef because he hasn't earned any michelen stars. I think it's crap, but maybe I'm wrong. What does is it take to be a "chef"?
  21. Raw tomatoes are available in plenty these days.This chutney is ideal as an accompaniment for chapathis or rotis and can be prepared ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator.the ingredients needed are: raw tomatoes -1/2kg, sesame seeds- 1 1/2 tbsp, green chillies- 4 or 5, salt and curry leaves.For the seasoning:oil ,mustard seeds,turmeric powder and asafoetida. Wash and cut the tomatoes into pieces and keep aside. Roast the sesame seeds till light brown in colour and keep aside.Heat oil in a kadai and at first roast the green chillies and curry leaves and keep aside.Then add tomatoes to it and let cook till tender.When cooked allow to cool and grind all the ingredients together with a little salt.The chutney is ready Add the seasoning and serve.
  22. I am doing an eGullet food blog over here and would love some input on using mustard seeds with cauliflower. I want to keep things simple and was thinking of tossing the sliced cauliflower with olive oil, salt, and mustard seeds (black, white?)- would they need to be toasted first? I plan on a hot 425F oven. I know this is not a standard Indian prep but I thought cooks familiar with Indian preps would be the most knowledgeable about mustard.
  23. Pumpkin Preserves These things are delicious. They're made the same way Eggplant Preserves are made. We used the lighter colored flesh of white pumpkins so that the end product is not too dark. Peel and cut pumpkin into small pieces and soak overnight in a solution of water and pickling lime. Use 1 cup lime per liter of water. Make enough to cover the pumpkin pieces. Use a plate to keep them submerged. Recommended pickling lime, can be found at Kroger. Rinse the pumpkin pieces thoroughly two to three times. Squeeze every piece by hand to get rid of excess moisture. In a pot, add 1 kilo water (1 liter), 1 kilo sugar, 1 T lemon juice and 5 Cloves for every kilo of pumpkin. Bring the syrup to a simmer then add the pumpkin. Simmer for 2.5 hours. Let cool and place in jars, distribute syrup evenly among them.
  24. Following Chris Hennes's wonderful tour of Rick Bayless's "Fiesta At Rick's" - under his "Camarónes a la Diabla" post, he notes: "... though Bayless suggests Tamazula hot sauce, and I used Valentina. The hot sauce makes up a very large percentage of the final sauce, so choose... wisely". Bayless also suggests Tamazula hot sauce for the shrimp/octopus cocktail as well. I just bought a 34 oz. bottle of Valentina for 98¢ (on sale) at my local Mex market. Although they also carry Tamazula, it's only in a small size, which indicates that Valentina is much more popular. Both are made by the same company (Tamazula), and the ingredient lists are the same. Does anyone know what their difference is? And while we're at it, how do the other popular hot sauces compare, such as Cholula and Tapatío?
×
×
  • Create New...