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  1. A while ago, to learn the ins and outs of Horseradish, I began making my own mustard. I have managed some really really good varieties, (one with black mustard seeds, rice-wine vinegar, horseradish and Kabocha squash) and some really god awful ones too. I recall that my grandmother used to make her own ketchup too. it wasn't all that good. has anyone made their own condiments before? care to share experiences?
  2. I mashed 10 cups of whole blackberries with two cups of sugar and added three packages of certo. I didn't cook this as I plan to freeze it. After refrigeration I checked the viscosity and it did not thicken any more. It's fine for toast and pancakes but it would be nicer to have a thicker jam without adding extra sugar and certo. Any suggestions from the experts?
  3. The fruit has been excellent this year and I find my shelves overflowing with jams and preserves. I have enough for the gifts that I usually give, so I'm trying to come up with other ways to use up my supply. I've got mango/lime, pineapple/ginger, cherry, mayhaw, pear/ginger, and peach. I don't use added pectin, so everything is of fairly soft consistency. So far I've come up with the following ideas: 1. Fill a cake or sandwich cookies 2. Mix into a plain ice cream base (will this work?) 3. Eat biscuits and jam for breakfast every morning for the rest of my life (not a bad notion) Any su
  4. With most spices I only keep the whole spice on hand: coriander, fennel, cumin, etc. But looking at my spice rack I see that I have both Colman's powdered mustard and mustard seeds. I never really gave it any thought, I just have both and use them when a recipe calls for one or the other. But is it necessary, or even desirable, to keep powdered mustard? Does it lose its potency faster than the whole seed (as with other spices)? Is it hard to grind because of the tiny, smooth spheres? Do you have both?
  5. I have been hearing about using copper vessels for making jam and jelly. Is there an advantage over conventional stainless pans? I live very close to Santa Clara del Cobre, where what seems like the entire population is engaged in either making or selling all kinds of copper products, from small decorative pieces to huge kettles for making carnitas and everything in between . So I could easily convert from my traditional cookware--stainless--to copper if there's a real advantage. Thanks for your advice/ideas.
  6. I love hot sauces...Im always curious as to what are the great ones since there are so many to choose from... Right now I have... Cholula's (w a wooden top) Tabasaco Habanero Tabasco Chipotle Heaven on SevenHeavenly Blend Emeril's Red Pepper Sauce Frank's Red Hot I like it hot but not way way way too hot you cant taste anything...what are your suggestions! Ive always wanted to try Dave's line and that call me sally stuff...what do you guys recommend that I run out and get NOW
  7. chowchow23

    Pickles

    hey everybody! i'm new here and i'm in love with pickles. i go through a jar a day and i was wondering if you guys know a simple recipe for pickling cucumbers? i'd like one without the need of dill, lime and peppers. thanks you guys
  8. We have threads in the Louisiana Forum on Tasso, Gumbo, Turducken, Andouille, and many other forms of food that are (or used to be, anyway) fairly unique to the Bayou State. Right now there is a foodblog being penned by Ronnie Suburban that has some excellent photos of the mise en place involved in cooking Gumbo. One of the pm's that I recieve here at Louisiana Central is "Where do I get great Jambalaya when I am visiting your wonderful and exotic homeland" (in truth, no one has ever phrased it quite like that, but I am still waiting ). I would like to hear where you think the best is (both
  9. I'm trying to make a Roasted Poblano and Black Bean Enchilada recipe and I don't know if the tomatillo cream sauce will be freezer-friendly. Basically I process the following ingredients in a food processor to make the cream sauce. I plan on freezing the sauce in ice-cube trays for individual servings. The sauce will then be thawed and spread on a baking dish and also used to top the enchiladas and cook in a 400 degree oven. Thanks! INGREDIENTS: -26 ounces canned tomatillos, drained -1 onion -1/2 cup cilantro leaves -1/3 cup vegetable bro
  10. Of late one of my favorite sandwich fixin's is Hellman's Mayonnaise mixed with an Indian Pickle. I'm speaking of the Indian condiment, usually lime or mango pickle. You know, the stuff that smells like Kiwi Shoe Polish, you either love it or hate it. It's always too chunky to spread on a sandwich so I often take a jar and puree it a bit for convenience. Mixed with the Hellman's it has quickly become a favorite on sandwiches made with turkey, chicken, pheasant, any kind of white meat and sometimes even leftover hanger steak. Anyone care to offer up their favorite "bastard condiment"?
  11. Which are the pickles you have in your pantry right now? Which are the ones you dream of? Any recipes? Any secrets? Any reading material? Please share - as Monica says Inquiring minds want to know...
  12. Retirement can do strange things to people I have an uncle who has always been a bit of DIY freak. As he and my aunt get older - they are becoming more and more careful of what kind of food they eat. Now that that they don't have growing kids to feed - they try to eat as much organic food as possible and grow alot it themselves. News reports out of HK last year detailed alot of the lack of quality controls in foods produced in China - so they decided to start making their own soy sauce. I wanted to provide a little update as to how this is done - and I was surprised that it was not as hard as
  13. Yesterday I had the always renewed pleasure of waiting in line for nearly half an hour at my local Poste to ship a package to a friend in Atlanta, GA. Inside: 3 jars of mustard. Weight of package: a hair over 2kg. The post office woman asked me what I was sending in my package and when I said, "De la moutarde," she looked at me and shook her head. Oh, no, that won't do. You can't send alimentary products to the U.S. People get their packages opened and pulled apart. She took out a book of rules in different countries and flipped through it until she found the U.S. Yes, indeed, I needed to decl
  14. i was reading michael ruhlman's blog, and sometimes he has his friend, anthony bourdain, write some guest pieces. well, in one of those pieces, bourdain calls james beard a 'much disliked crank'. i understand why the beard awrds themselves might be viewed in a unfavorable light, but what did the man do to engender such feelings? this is the first time i've ever read or heard something so nasty about a man who did so much for the culinary arts in this country. http://blog.ruhlman.com/ruhlmancom/2007/03/index.html
  15. Guss's pickles in the Lower East Side (the place with the barrels on the sidewalk) is fighting United Pickle for the rights to the Guss's name. New York Times
  16. Kudos to Chef Celina Tio, of The American Restaurant, for being named the James Beard Foundation's Best Chef of the Midwest.
  17. As far as I can tell -- and, believe me, I've been working hard to disprove what I'm about to say -- this is the very last bottle of Inner Beauty Real Hot Sauce on the planet: I became a fan of Inner Beauty two decades ago, when Chris Schlesinger brought his grillin' and BBQin' to Cambridge MA at East Coast Grill. After a while, this legendary hot sauce (mustard-based, with fruit, spices, and habaneros) started appearing in grocery stores throughout NE and became a big hit on the burgeoning hot sauce circuit. It was my go-to hot sauce, and I probably went through a bottle every couple of mon
  18. Can anybody recommend any good books for chutney/relish making? Preferably something that's available in the UK - but open to looking elsewhere. Many Thanks Darryl.
  19. I know you do not need to refrigerate the full bone but I have a quarter pound of slices and it feels weird to leave it out. Is it ok to keep it in the fridge? Thanks.
  20. The sequence of posts that began at No. 71 in johnnyd's foodblog got me to thinking: Condiments are the culinary equivalent of kudzu. Or maybe they breed like rabbits. In any case, give 'em enough room and time, and eventually, they take over all the available shelf space in your pantry. I figure the process works something like this: You're about to make a dish that requires a certain type of condiment sauce, oil, or vinegar. You go out to the store to buy a bottle. Of course, the recipe doesn't require the entire bottle, so what's left goes on your shelf. Some time later, you're out shoppi
  21. As has been widely reported in the Vancouver media James Barber passed away at his home in Vancouver Island a few days ago. I wanted to pay tribute to the man as he is one of the giants on the food scene in Vancouver and as often happens to those who live a long life their accomplishments can tend to fade from memory. There is so much more to James then Money's Mushrooms or the Urban Peasant. I won't pretend to give a bio on his life as I have not been acquainted with his professional career for that long but I first became aware of his talent when I moved to Vancouver in the mid 80's. At the
  22. Okay, here is what we had: Moutarde Violette (recette Charentaise) Nice mellow mustard that would be tasty with crackers and cheese. The sweetness of the wine mellows out the mustard seed really well. Moutard de Truffe (Tubissime) OMG, that is not okay! Two tastes that came together as something you would shoot at a fancy fraternity party, as a dare. Moutard au Miel (Champ's) Yummy, a discernible amount of honey created a delicious classic pairing. (While I didn't have time to bring it, the honey mustard from Les Abilles is amazing. It features a spike of horseradish that gives it another di
  23. Sorry to lower the tone, but did anyone catch his TV show last night? Christ is there no end to this mans philanthropy, when he dies they should canonise him at least. Anyway the basis is, Jamie is going to give one of his 'downtrodden, disadvantaged and desolate' trainees the chance to run their own restaurant. So four trainees have to battle it out to see who wins etc etc. Of course the purpose of this venture is not to promote his ever expanding empire and do-gooder image, but to give some poor soul the chance to be happy, successful and a whole person. However a few questions/ points: 1. T
  24. The latest eG Radio foodcast -- an exclusive interview with the editor of the New York Times dining section (Pete Wells) and the editor-in-chief of Saveur magazine (James Oseland) -- is online and available for download now. The announcement, download and subscription links are here. This topic is for discussion of the content of the current eG Radio foodcast. If you need technical support with, for example, downloading or playing the foodcast, please use the Technical Support forum. If you have questions or comments about the eG Radio foodcast effort that are not related to the specific issu
  25. This is going to be a rant, since I need to write this post having just walked in the door from the most underwhelming meal I’ve had in this city in ten years. My two friends, let’s call them Jerry and Sean, came down from New York to visit for the day. Sean wanted us to go to James restaurant for dinner, because he’s friends with the sous chef and pastry chef there from a previous job. Joining us were two other friends, let’s call them Jim and Pat. Pat is friends with the owner’s wife from a previous job. We arrive for a 6:30 reservation with bottles of wine, since they don’t yet have th
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