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Found 568 results

  1. Kent Wang

    Jellyfish

    From the Only a Chinese would eat it thread, I learned that the Chinese aren't the only ones that eat jellyfish. The Chinese usually prepare it by chopping up the jellyfish head into small strips and serving cold, sometimes mixed with radish(?) which also has a crispy texture. How do other cultures prepare it?
  2. Never do I buy ANYTHING because it is endorsed by someone famous (at least not consciously), but my friend got Jamie Oliver's T-fal stuff and I liked the hefty weight. I haven't used them so I'm not sure how they perform. What are your thoughts? I've always gotten my cookware from resturant supply houses because I refused to spend the money for a name. I used another friends All-Clad Copper Core sauteuse and I was amazed at how well it performed. I guess for 350 bucks it better!!. Jamie/T-fal is very reasonably priced and it's my 40th B'day on Monday so my DW wants to buy me a set.
  3. I really miss Frank's Red Hot Sauce. I use it to make the hotwings I grew up with. Other hot sauces I can find easily in NY are not doing the job. Anyone know where I can buy it in Manhattan? Thanks folks, Grace
  4. MarketStEl

    Condiment Creep

    The sequence of posts that began at No. 71 in johnnyd's foodblog got me to thinking: Condiments are the culinary equivalent of kudzu. Or maybe they breed like rabbits. In any case, give 'em enough room and time, and eventually, they take over all the available shelf space in your pantry. I figure the process works something like this: You're about to make a dish that requires a certain type of condiment sauce, oil, or vinegar. You go out to the store to buy a bottle. Of course, the recipe doesn't require the entire bottle, so what's left goes on your shelf. Some time later, you're out shopping when something new or unusual catches your eye on a shelf somewhere. You think to yourself, "Hmmm, I'd like to try this and see what it tastes like." Into your cart and onto your shelf it goes, there to await its star turn. On your birthday, or on Christmahaunkwanzaakah, someone--a friend, relative, or co-worker--buys you a bottle of an exotic __________, knowing that you are particularly fond of sauces of this type. You thank the giver profusely and sock it away, making a mental note to be sure (never) to invite him over for dinner (sometime in the future). Before you know it, you're like me (and H.J. Heinz)--you have 57 varieties of oils and sauces of varying kinds, including multiple varieties of vinegars, mustards, salsas, marinades, oils and hot sauces, and maybe even more than one variety of ketchup (in addition to Heinz, I have a bottle of La Niña Spicy Ketchup I bought three weeks ago), scattered throughout your pantry and fridge. I'm only presenting my census data in the aggregate: 14 hot sauces, including 5 habanero sauces, one Louisiana-type, one cayenne sauce, two Huy Fong sauces (sriracha and chili garlic) and two varieties of Tabasco (but not the original--I need to restock it) 7 oils, including the basic cooking oils (canola, soybean) and the buttery-flavored canola oil for popping popcorn 6 vinegars, including 3 rice vinegars 5 types of mustard, one mixed with mayo 3 soy sauces, counting teriyaki as a soy sauce 3 marinades 2 sweet chili sauces -- one American, one Asian 2 bottled salad dressings, one left by a guest who brought a tossed salad to a dinner 2 pancake syrups, one "lite" 2 barbecue sauces 2 steak sauces (Heinz 57 and A1) 2 varieties of ketchup 1 jar of salsa 1 jar of mayonnaise (Hellman's, natch) 1 jar of hoisin sauce 1 bottle of fish sauce 1 bottle of Worcestershire sauce 1 chutney Angostura bitters Top this, why don'tcha? I'm sure some of you can.
  5. marie-louise

    Jamba Juice

    They are mostly in CA (no surprise, I guess) but many other states seem to have a few. http://www.jambajuice.com/what/index.html I'm curious what others think of them; I've never seen anyone mention them on eGullet. In my opinion, these are the perfect food for after a hike-fluid, carbs, and cold. My previous favorite post-hike snacks have been Scharffenberger bittersweet chocolate & ice water; a homemade chocolate chip-oatmeal cookie; an It's-It; or an In-n-Out chocolate milkshake. I actually like these better than any of my previous chocolate treats!!! I'm slowly but surely finding all of the nearest locations to each of our local parks. My favorite flavor is Orange-a-Peel,but I also like the cranberry one, Razzamataz, and the two w/ passion fruit in them. The mango one isn't too bad, either. I get the Femme boost.
  6. SobaAddict70

    Ketchup

    I've never been able to figure out why foodies tend to despise ketchup. Like just about any condiment, it has its applications. If you don't like it, there are a million other condiments out there. The same goes for Worcestershire sauce and barbecue sauce, deli mustard and honey mustard, pickle relish and mango chutney, and jarred salsa. Why ask why? Just enjoy it for what it is. Maybe I'm weird for liking ketchup. I also will eat pickle relish straight out of a jar. Ditto for hoisin sauce. Soba PS. In the omuraisu thread in the Japan forum, Hiroyuki asks pretty much the same question, ao I thought I'd ask all y'all.
  7. Holly Moore

    Southern Preserves

    Not that the issue of the South and butter has been explained I'm turning my attention to fruit preserves, Southern style. Unlike the preserves I've grown up on, a lumpy sweet slurry that easily spreads on toast. Jack McDavid, at Jack's Firehouse in Philadelphia, first introduced me to what I assume is the Southern approach to preserves - a thin sweet syrup with large chunks of fruit. Since then I've seen such preserves throughout the South, most recently at Monell's in Nashville. The chunks of fruit are indeed tasty. I spoon them out of the syrup and gently balance them on a biscuit half. Sometimes they don't full out en route to my mouth, staining my shirt. But the syrup pretty much goes to waste. What am I not getting? What's the proper way to apply Southern style preserves? Why are they so, what we Yankees would call, watery?
  8. Last night's balmy skies graced our cocktail hour in the garden of the James Beard House. Apparently there are a lot of Bordeaux Wine Lovers a bout since this sold out event was subscribed by a diverse age group. The only 'difficult' part of the evening was making one's way past the swarm of staff from The Highlawn Pavilion & Manor who were hard at work in the petite kitchen to make each plate picture perfect. The appetizerrs [Frogs Legs w. black garlic, Spoons of Lobster w. mango, shots of spring pea soup w. jamon froth, wagu beef w. leeks and FG torchon] lept off the plates. Perhaps it was the Perrier-Jouet that helped them slide down? As Chef Mitchell Altholz slaved away in the kitchen ad the Knowles dynasty kept a laid back but watchful eye, the rest of us enjoyed this multi-course meal that began w. a plate of assorted crudo and ended with desserts typical of Bordeaux. An oil poached halibut, pheasant w foie gras & truffle & beef w. Bordeaux & blue cheese filled the gap between first and last courses. Michael Giulini of Deutsch & Sons supplied some excellent wines from Chateau Bonnet Rose to Ch Coucheroy Blanc to a Margaux, and a St Emilion. Surely the spirit of James Beard was hovering overhead on this wonderful evening...and me, I was the luckiest, as I got to enjoy all of it!
  9. bleudauvergne

    Crepes - Jambon cru aux champignons

    Crepes - Jambon cru aux champignons Serves 6 as Main Dishor 12 as Appetizer. This crepe recipe features the standard white flour batter. It brings forward the salty goodness of cured ham, complimented by fresh mushrooms and simple bechamel. Comfort food. 250 g flour type 55 or US all purpose 2 eggs 50 cl milk 50 cl water butter for the crepe pan For the crepe stuffing: 25 g butter 3 thick slices of cured ham, jambon de savoie, parma, etc. 250 g white mushrroms (champignons de Paris) For the Bechamel: 40 g flour type fluide 45 or US all pupose 40 g butter 40 cl milk nutmeg salt fresh ground black pepper 1) Make the batter. Sift the flour into a bowl. put the eggs into a well inthe center of the flour, and incorporate into the flour. Add the milk and the water a little at a time, whisking constantly until it is smooth and liquidy. Add salt and pepper. Set aside to rest for at least 2 hours. 2) During that time, prepare the bechamel. Melt the butter in a saucepan. Add the flour all at once and incorporate into melted butter, stir constantly over medium low heat for 5 minutes, without coloring. Add the milk all at once and stir in, bring back to a simmer. Add the m\nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Keep warm. 3) Sliver the ham finely. Slice the mushrooms thin, and saute them in the 25 grams of butter. Add the ham to and toss with the mushrooms briefly, and fold the mixure into the bechamel. Rectify the seasoning. Set aside. 4) Heat a serving platter in the oven to keep the crepes warm once you've assembled them (90C/200F). Cook the crepes by thinly spreading the batter over the surface of a hot buttered crepe pan. (throw away or eat the first one because the first one is always a little strange). Once it's brown underneath, spread the filling in the center of the crepe, and roll it up. Place the assembled crepes on the serving platter and keep warm until you serve them Keywords: Appetizer, Brunch, Main Dish, Lunch, Easy, Dinner, Pork, French ( RG947 )
  10. I am looking for a recipe. I got from someone a jar of Jalepenos pickeled in a sweet soy sauce brine. It was amazing. Crunchy, sweet, salty and hot. I couldn't stop eating them. Now they are all gone and I don't have a recipe for it. I don't know the Korean name for it but the this soy sauce based sauce is also used to pickle other vegetables (e.g., garlic). I would really appreciate the recipe. Thanks in advance... Soup
  11. LindyCat

    Spirit Jams

    No, I don't mean ghostly apparitions on the toast of Christmas Past. I have a recipe for a red-wine jam (red zin or merlot work well) that is absolutely out of this world on a loaf of fresh, nutty wheat bread, and wondered if anyone had encountered such a thing for other alcohols. Now that it is far too close to Christmas to make such a thing, I thought a trio of "grown-up" jam would make a great present for any of those people you can't ever seem to buy for. Office folks and the like. I can't think of what might work well, though, perhaps addding a spirit to a juice to make something like rum-passionfruit jelly?
  12. Okay, here is what we had: Moutarde Violette (recette Charentaise) Nice mellow mustard that would be tasty with crackers and cheese. The sweetness of the wine mellows out the mustard seed really well. Moutard de Truffe (Tubissime) OMG, that is not okay! Two tastes that came together as something you would shoot at a fancy fraternity party, as a dare. Moutard au Miel (Champ's) Yummy, a discernible amount of honey created a delicious classic pairing. (While I didn't have time to bring it, the honey mustard from Les Abilles is amazing. It features a spike of horseradish that gives it another dimension). Moutard de Picard (Champ's) I felt the cider didn't add anything to the taste. The flavor was as if plain whole grain had cider vinegar dumped into the batch. Moutard au Vin Charentais Nice whole grain look, but tasted of dust and cider. Verjus et Miel (Maille) Nothing special, tasted of your basic brown mustard. Horshradish (Maille) I LOVE horseradish and assumed I would love this mustard. Unfortunately this mustard tasted nothing of the bite or tang of horseradish and instead offered only little pickled nuggets of the root. Forte de Dijon (Monoprix) The strongest of the Dijons. A bit too powerful for most applications. Unless of course you want to clear your sinuses instantly. French's ballpark Oh French's, this instantly takes me back to pulling those nasty encrusted udders at Fenway. How can I say anything bad about something so charged with good memories. French's Dijon So either this one had gone bad, or just IS really bad. Tastes of flour and flowers, with hints of cardboard thrown in. The texture was pasty to boot. Moutarde de Dijon (Champ's) Classic Dijon taste without being overwhelming like the one from Monoprix. Moutarde de Meaux (Pommery) Big bits of whole grain but with a smooth taste that develops in the mouth. Hints of Champagne left a nice finish that felt as though it would cut through a fatty steak really well. For me the best of the lot were the Champ's au Miel and Dijon, both of which represented the best of their respective genres. My other favorite was the moutarde de Meaux which was both original and delicious. The French's Dijon and the moutarde de Truffe should be labeled as "not meant for consumption". The French's ballpark gets high scores for nostalgia. Here is a link to the labels and the pretzels: Mustard Gallery
  13. Yah, yah, I'm sick, it's supposedly end stage cancer, I'm going through total skin electron beam radiation, blahdiblah blah... Here's the important thing. I NEED a decent pickle. I do not want to meet the end (or face the fight against an end) without having savored, at least once more, a delicious-perfectly pickled-puckery-garlicky-yet-not-overpoweringly-so cucumber, even if it isn't of my own manufacture. I have NO energy. I AM fussy about my pickles. The plebian yet enjoyable BaTampte isn't going to cut is this time. Where can I send a well meaning friend in the Freehold area to acquire this lovely for me? I prefer a more than slightly green pickle, a well pickled, but still light and crisp pickle, where the flesh hasn't greened as yet. Garlic is a must. Vinegar is a no no. Brine is the all important base. Can any of you NJ experts assist me? My friend is ready for action at any time.
  14. I was in my local wine store today and decided to pick up some Scotch. I was in two or three minds about what to get until someone went in the back and pressed the above bottle into my hand. It appears to be a house blend from the well known London spirits merchants, though their Web site gives no hint this even exists. It tastes its age, costs all of $30 and it's bloody good. Has anyone else come across this before? Perhaps it's a U.S.-only bottling?
  15. lperry

    Jam and preserves

    The fruit has been excellent this year and I find my shelves overflowing with jams and preserves. I have enough for the gifts that I usually give, so I'm trying to come up with other ways to use up my supply. I've got mango/lime, pineapple/ginger, cherry, mayhaw, pear/ginger, and peach. I don't use added pectin, so everything is of fairly soft consistency. So far I've come up with the following ideas: 1. Fill a cake or sandwich cookies 2. Mix into a plain ice cream base (will this work?) 3. Eat biscuits and jam for breakfast every morning for the rest of my life (not a bad notion) Any suggestions would be appreciated. It's only July and I have always had a strange compulsion to put food in jars all summer long. Please help! Thanks, Linda
  16. jackal10

    Green Tomato Chutney

    Green Tomato Chutney Adapted from Bulletin 21 "Home Preservation of Fruit and Vegetables", Her Majesty's Stationary Office, first published 1929 You can adapt this for any garden surplus: apples, marrow, plums etc. Liquidised and sieved you can use it as the basis for a brown (steak) sauce. The long slow cooking and maturing gives a mellow dark brown chutney. The basic ingredients should be cut up and cooked so that the result is not completely smooth, but nothing is directly recognisable. Raisins, small cubes of crytallised ginger etc may be added to give character. 8 lb Green tomatoes 2 lb Apples 1 lb Raisins 2-1/2 lb Onions 2 chillis (more if you like it hotter) 1 oz Ginger 1 oz Salt 2 lb Brown sugar 2 pt Vinegar Cut up the tomatoes, peel and chop the onions and apples. Chop the raisins if they are large. Chop up the giner and the chillis, and tie them in a piece of muslin Place everything in a large pan, bring to the boil and simmer slowly until the desired consistency - about 8 hours. Remove the bag of spices and bottle in preserving jars (canning jars) while hot. Leave for a month or more in a dark cupboard. Keywords: Condiment ( RG1416 )
  17. Lindacakes

    Gotta Find the Jam, Man!

    Somewhere I read about an expansive jam from Britian, can't remember where I read about it (Here? Gastronomica? The Saturday Evening Post?) but a woman described it as teeny tiny whole strawberries and oh-so-delicious. Cannot google myself into it . . . The preserving thread, which captivated me yesterday, made me remember it. Can you help me?
  18. Next week I will be volunteering at the James Beard house as a student chef. I figured that this will be a good opportunity to get in a little practice and learn some new techniques. I was told that the typical work will be prep and maybe some plating. My main concern is that I studied baking and pastry in culinary school. I was not taught knife skills, meat fab, etc... that I might have to do. The volunteer coordinator at the James Beard Foundation assured me that I will be able to be of use. Given that i am paying approx $35 round trip train ticket from New Haven, CT to volunteer, I want to make sure that i will be of service. What do you think? Thanks, Dan
  19. Suzanne F

    Green Tomato Jam

    Green Tomato Jam Makes about 8 3/4 cups of jam; about ten 1-cup (8 ounce) jars. This recipe is adapted from the General Foods Consumer Center. 1-3/4 lb green tomatoes 1/2 c lemon juice 7-1/2 c sugar (3-1/4 pounds) 2 pkg (pouches) fruit pectin jell Wash the tomatoes. Grind, and measure 3 cups of tomatoes into a 6- to 8-quart nonreactive pot. Add the lemon juice. Add the sugar and mix thoroughly. Place over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. As soon as it reaches a boil, stir in the pectin. Bring to a full rolling boil, and boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam. Ladle immediately into hot, sterilized canning jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of the top. Wipe the rims and threads of the jars. Cover the jars with 2-piece lids and screw the bands tightly. Invert the jars for 5 minutes, then turn upright. Let cool for 1 hour, then check seals. Variation: I added some finely minced lemongrass and very finely julienned lime leaf, for a little more "exotic" flavor. Keywords: Intermediate, Vegetables, Condiment ( RG731 )
  20. Monica Bhide

    Shorshe bate Macch – Mustard Fish

    Shorshe bate Macch – Mustard Fish This recipe is from The Beginner's Guide to Regional Indian Cooking in th eCGI ¼ cup black mustard seeds ¼ cup white mustard seeds A touch of garlic (Not traditional but the Chef loves it so we added it!) 4 fillets white fish (small Tilapia fillets) 1 tsp turmeric salt to taste Mustard oil to panfry the fish 2 Serrano green chilies, slit Soak mustard seeds (I use 50% black and 50% white) in water for 10-15 minutes. In a blender, grind mustard seeds and garlic with enough water. Start with a relatively less water and slowly keep adding water as needed. The final consistency will be a bit more liquid than Dijon mustard. Make sure that there are no whole seeds left over. In my blender, this process takes about 10 minutes. This will be your gravy. Don't forget to add a bit of salt and mix some more. Set aside. Marinate fish fillets with the turmeric and the salt. Heat a shallow pan with a little bit of mustard oil, over medium high heat. When oil starts to smoke, add in the fish pieces so they are in a single layer. After a minute or so, turn them over, and cook until brown. Remove from heat. In the same oil add the mustard paste. Add some slit green chilies for some heat. Cook the mustard paste until it starts boiling and then add the fish. Simmer for another 3 – 5 minutes. Serve hot. Keywords: Main Dish, Fish, Indian, eGCI ( RG884 )
  21. ANDIE'S ABSOLUTELY ADDICTING BREAD & BUTTER PICKLES Here’s the thing about pickles: if you’ve never made them, they may seem to be an overwhelming (and possibly mysterious) project. Our listener Andie – who has offered some really valuable help to the show several times in the past – has sent this recipe which provides an opportunity to “try your hand” at pickle-making without much effort. Andie suggests that making a small batch, and storing the pickles in the refrigerator (without “processing”) can get you started painlessly. Our Producer Lisa says that the result is so delicious that you won’t be able to keep these pickles on hand - even for the 3-4 months that they’ll safely keep! The basics are slicing the cucumbers and other veggies, tossing them with salt and crushed ice and allowing them to stand for awhile to become extra-crisp. You then make a simple, sweet and spicy syrup, (Andie does this in the microwave), rinse your crisp veggies, put them in a jar, pour the syrup over, and keep them in the refrigerator until they’re “pickled” – turning the jar upside down each day. In about 2 weeks you’ll have pickles – now how much easier could that be? If you are inspired, I hope you’ll try these – and enjoy! MAKES ABOUT 1 QUART. FOR THE PICKLES: 4 to 6 pickling cucumbers (cucumbers should be not much larger than 1 inch in diameter, and 4 to 5 inches long) 1/2 to 3/4 of one, medium size onion. 1/2 red bell pepper. 1/4 cup, pickling salt (coarse kosher salt) 2 quarts, cracked ice water to cover 2 tablespoons, mustard seed. 1 heaping teaspoon, celery seed FOR THE SYRUP: 1 1/2 cups, vinegar *NOTE: Use cider or distilled white vinegar, do not use wine vinegar. 1 1/2 cups, sugar 2 heaping teaspoons, pickling spice mix. PREPARE THE PICKLES: Carefully wash the cucumbers and bell pepper. Slice all vegetables very thin, using a food processor with a narrow slicing blade, or by hand, or using a V-slicer or mandoline. Toss the sliced vegetables together in a glass or crockery bowl large enough to hold twice the volume of the vegetables. Sprinkle the salt over the vegetables, add the cracked ice, toss again to blend all ingredients and add water to just barely cover the vegetables. Place a heavy plate on top of the vegetables to keep them below the top of the liquid. *Set aside for 4 hours. PREPARE THE SYRUP: Place the vinegar, sugar and pickling spices in a 4-quart Pyrex or other microwavable container (the large Pyrex measure works very well) Microwave on high for 15 to 20 minutes. [if a microwave is not available, simmer the syrup in a narrow saucepan on the stovetop, over low heat, for the same length of time.] Allow the syrup to cool. Strain the syrup and discard the spices. ASSEMBLE THE PICKLES: Place one wide-mouth quart canning jar (or two wide-mouth pint jars) with their lids in a pot of water to cover, place over medium heat and bring the water to a simmer (180 degrees). Remove the pot from the heat and allow jar(s) and lid(s) to remain in the hot water until needed. *After the 4 hours are up (crisping the vegetables as described above) pour the vegetables into a large colander and rinse well. The cucumber slices should taste only slightly salty. Return the rinsed vegetables to the bowl, add the mustard seeds and celery seeds and toss well until evenly distributed. Set aside. Return the syrup to the microwave, microwave on high for 8 to 10 minutes [or heat the syrup on the stovetop] until an instant read thermometer shows the temperature of the syrup is 190 to 200 degrees. Place the vegetables into one wide-mouth quart jar, or in 2 wide-mouth pint jars that have been scalded as described above. Pour the syrup over the vegetables, place the lids on the jar or jars, tighten well and place in the refrigerator overnight. The following day, turn the jar upside down - then continue to turn every day for 2 weeks. (This is to insure that the pickles are evenly flavored) After 2 weeks open the jar and taste. The pickles should be ready to eat. Pickles will keep in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 months. ( RG2154 )
  22. Stone

    Ketchup

    Oscar Madison called it "tomato wine." I love it. I love it on everything. I splosh it on my burgers. I plosh it on my vindaloo. I mosh it into my ice cream. I splorge it on my morning cereal. I squeeze it over corn, under towers of steak tartare, around store-bought pastry-puffs of mushroom and crab, and into doughnuts because what's jelly anyway but a misguided attempt at fruit-ketchup. I drench it on broccoli and quench my thirst with it. I've done away with Crest in favor of Heinzing my teeth every morning. 57 varieties for 30 teeth. I've filled my jacuzzi with a delightfully sweet tomotao froth. Some people think ketchup should be banned. That's crazy talk if you ask me. What say we petition the government to declare Ketchup the truly American food (hamburger and frankfurter sound too tuetonic for such an honor).
  23. Suvir Saran

    Pickles / Preserves

    In America, we think of pickles as a kind of a relish, or side dish – a cured vegetable that adds a sour or tart note to the meal. We pickle a variety of different vegetables but, for whatever the differences, pickles all have a recognizably “pickled” taste. Indian pickles use many of the same ingredients – salt, vinegar, coriander, mustard seeds, turmeric, cinnamon, cloves and ginger – but they present some of the most diverse and exotic tastes and textures imaginable. They are fiery hot, sour, pungent, fragrant, sweet- and- sour, and tart. They are crisp, silky and chewy. Flavors may be fresh, the taste of each spice distinct, or married and intensified by months or even years of aging as the textures of the ingredients melt and soften. While Indians eat some pickles (such as the Mixed Vegetable Pickle, below) in relatively large quantities, the pickles are often too intensely flavored to be eaten that way; they’re used in tiny amounts as a spice or condiment to enliven a dish. Indians also use pickles in a way that Americans never do, that is, medicinally, to cure an ailment. Indians love to taste food; they live to taste food. Indians want many layers and many contrasting tastes. No one food can satisfy that hunger except a variety of pickles. I have jars and jars of multi-colored pickles sitting on the kitchen table. One is a tiny onion pickle, picked young and fresh and pickled in rice vinegar, that is common to almost all north Indian homes. Several are pickled chilies: one is made of whole green chilies and is dangerously hot while another, made from habaneros stuffed with spices, is more savory than hot, and a third is made from chopped green chilies soured with lemon. There is a crunchy sweet- and- hot cauliflower, turnip and carrot pickle, a ginger-lime pickle and a gooseberry pickle. These pickles are made from recipes that have been handed down by the women of my family for two to three hundred years. Some of these jars have been maturing for just a few days, others for much longer than that. A jar of lemon pickles made by his family chef at home in India, a jar that has been maturing for 60 years. In India, food is understood to be intimately related to health and medicine. The Ayurveda, the ancient Hindu text that defines the relationship of food, spices, exercise and meditation for the health of the human body, gives recipes for various medicinal foods and elixirs, of which pickles play an important role. I use lemon pickle as it is traditionally used in my native country: to cure queasiness and tummy aches. In my New York household I use pickles the way that wealthier households do in India, as a condiment guaranteed to give plain foods taste. In fact, in India it’s considered rude to ask for pickles if they are not on the table; it suggests that the food isn’t savory enough. Indian homes make several signature pickles, recipes that have been passed down through generations of women. Pickles made the season before are served daily. Aged, well-loved pickles are brought out when someone is sick or when the household is hosting a special meal. With the exception of some pickles that are made with winter produce such as cauliflower, radishes, turnips and carrots, pickles are made in Indian homes in the heat of the summer. Fruits and vegetables are bought from local vendors who sell door to door. Women spend several weeks preparing pickles. The fruits are laid out on terraces on sheets of muslin for several days in the summer sun to dry, or “ripen” and concentrate their flavors. The produce is brought inside every night to protect against dew and laid out again in the morning. The pickles are put up in very large ceramic jars, each about 20 inches tall and 8 inches wide. Once jarred, the pickles are ripened again for several more days in the sun. If you ask an Indian where the best pickles are made, they will name three centers: the Marwari and Baniya trading communities in northern India, the state of Gujerat in western India, and the state of Andhra Bradesh, in southern India. The Marwari and Baniya communities are completely vegetarian and they subsist on pickles and bread. The people of these communities make pickles everyday and their meals include several different types. Pickles that are spiced with fenugreek and fennel and pickled in mustard oil, are likely to be from northern India, as are pickled cauliflower, carrots, turnips and radishes, the so called “winter vegetables” that are grown on the northern plains. Pickles represent a ritual world of food and community in India. Pickling is an ancient art and a part of Hindu spiritual practice: according to the laws of Hindu religion, pickling, or “cooking” foods with sun and air is one of the three acceptable ways to make raw foods palatable. The rituals of pickle making define a certain period of the summer in India when entire households are given over to the task of their making. Traditionally, in small towns, the women join together, spending days outside in the shade of tamarind trees cutting, preparing, and drying the fruits and vegetables. The kids play above in the dense greenery of the trees, eating the green fruit of the tamarind and tossing the seeds onto the ground below. (Stomach aches and tiny tamarind seedlings are evidence of their gluttony.) Play, food, music and storytelling combine to give the season a celebratory mood. Even in urban centers in India today, the time of pickling still invites ritual community and celebration. Women call each other on the phone to organize the making of the pickles or to ask for the gift of a jar of a favorite kind. Life slows a bit, personal connections are made, and thousands of years of ritual is repeated. --Suvir Saran and Stephanie Lyness
  24. mikeczyz

    coconut chutney

    any ideas on how to make it? fresh coconut? what is it ususally served along with? what purpose to chutney's serve? calm down spicy foods? mike
  25. article from the Scotsman UK Seems he is quite innovative .. from his taking on the British school meals to smoking bans ....More to the cheeky lad than originally met the eye it seems .... and other notables have paid attention to him in a variety of ways. Quite a "loverly" article, if I do say so myself!
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