Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Charcuterie'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Society Announcements
    • Announcements
    • Member News
    • Welcome Our New Members!
  • Society Support and Documentation Center
    • Member Agreement
    • Society Policies, Guidelines & Documents
  • The Kitchen
    • Beverages & Libations
    • Cookbooks & References
    • Cooking
    • Kitchen Consumer
    • Culinary Classifieds
    • Pastry & Baking
    • Ready to Eat
    • RecipeGullet
  • Culinary Culture
    • Food Media & Arts
    • Food Traditions & Culture
    • Restaurant Life
  • Regional Cuisine
    • United States
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • India, China, Japan, & Asia/Pacific
    • Middle East & Africa
    • Latin America
  • The Fridge
    • Q&A Fridge
    • Society Features
    • eG Spotlight Fridge

Product Groups

  • Donation Levels
  • Feature Add-Ons

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


LinkedIn Profile


Location

Found 434 results

  1. Erich vG

    Salumi Questions...

    Hey Y'all- I've been very successful at making tesa (flat pancetta) and various fermented, moulded salamis for our restaurant, but have a couple of questions regarding whole-muscle cuts, (think culatello, lomo, speck, etc.) 1. For the coppa and lomo I have curing/hanging presently, I have used a 5% salt to raw weight ratio. If the initial cure is done in plastic bags, will this be about right? I know that prosciutti require 6%, but I figured that since they are allowed to "drip" and contain the bone, then 5% should be about right for boneless, "wet-cured" cuts. 2. The FDA requires 200 ppm nitrite in dry cured meat products. Cure #1 is 6.25% nitrite by weight, so the calculation for nitrite addition is easy, but the #2 cure I am using, (from Butcher & Packer), is 5.67% nitrite and 3.63% nitrate. Should I calculate for a nitrite value to equal 200 ppm, or should I just assume that over the hanging time the nitrate will be degraded into the appropriate level of nitrite? 3. Culatello is called the "heart of the prosciutto". Am I to assume that this is a single-muscle cut containing only the pork top round, or is it "harvested" including other muscles? 4. Which muscles/muscle groups are used to produce real Südtirol-style Speck? 5. Where the hell does one find hog bladders!!?? Thanks in advance for your input, you'll see a lot more of me around here.... Erich
  2. i just had some for the first time and i can say that it's the best stuff i've had this side of the atlantic. rustic flavors, plenty of fat, and NO HEAT. i hate the heat i get from the additives in most dried salame. looking forward to trying some of the other products in moderation as they can be costly (no implication that i believe it to be overpriced) http://store.framani.com/index.html
  3. RichyRich

    Bacon With A Major Attitude

    Still bothered from last night. I am writing to you all for your opinion. Was at a very popular BBQ place in Brooklyn (will leave nameless for now) that sells meat by the pound. In addition to my brisket and pork belly order, I ordered a 1/2 pound of raw house-cured bacon. I have ordered this before and loved, loved, loved it. On my last order of the bacon, they sliced the meat long and thick, ala Peter Luger's (fried up, it was unreal). Now this time, the BBQ slicer/counter guy called the back of the house guy and summoned the bacon. It weighed 1lb so he cut the rectangle in half, making 2 squares, one of which was supposed to be mine. Well, who orders a 4"x5" block of raw BACON that when sliced up and cooked would be nothing more than niblets. Still wanting the goodness I acquiesced and watched as he began to wrap the block unsliced. I said "Bud, could you slice that?" He said "NO" straight out. I was like WTF, are you F-ing kidding me? The bacon sells for $10.50 a pound, which to me is a price that warrants slicing if I so choose. My favorite butcher, Fiacco's in Brooklyn, charges $5.99 a pound and we all know the Oscar Meyer stuff is $3-$5 a pound. Back to the counter guy, so after he said "NO" he said "Why, you can't slice it yourself," to which I replied "No, for the price I would like it sliced." He said, "Can't do it." I said, "Don't want it." I ate my cue, which was amazing, but was bothered by the attitude and still am. Shouldn't the paying customer have a legitimate say? Am I way off here people? What's up with these BROOKLYNY HIPSTER attitudes? FYI: I will attempt a bacon purchase again and will preface my wants and needs. Sad I didn't have it this AM when I woke up.
  4. rlibkind

    Lamb Bacon

    I couldn't find a topic dedicated to lamb bacon in a quick search, so here goes . . . I ordered two lamb breasts from one of my Reading Terminal Market butchers in Philadelphia, and for less than $16 got two breasts with the bones removed (reserved for scotch broth or grilled riblets for nibbling - there's still a little meat left). I followed the simple recipe from Mark Bittman's blog (contributed by Danny Meyer, from a recipe from his colleague Brian Mayer; you can find it here). It's two cups salt, one cup sugar, coat the meat, wrap and let it sit in the fridge for 2-4 days until firm. (Mine took four.) Then roast at 250F until you hit internal temp of 140F. I failed to correct for my inaccurate oven, so I overcooked a bit and didn't pull the breasts until they hit 180F. But they were still delicious. Here are the before and after cooking photos:
  5. Mayhaw Man

    Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

    Chicken and Sausage Gumbo It all started when I went to the meat market this morning and bought 3 lbs of chicken thighs. These are not Tyson's Plastic, but real chicken cut by real butchers. They are very good. I got 2 lbs of Richard's Pork Sausage and made a couple of stops to fill my vegetable needs. Sausage from Richard's is great --looks like cased ham! This stuff is just awesome. If you can get it I highly reccomend it. They make (imho) the best commercial pork products in the US. For a photo play-by-play, click Here. And, here's the definitive EG thread on Gumbo. Gumbo cooked 'round the world. 3 lb chicken thighs 2 lb pork sausage sliced, into about 1/4" coins Dusting: 2 c flour 1 T salt 1 tsp paprika 1 T cayenne powder 1 tsp cracked black pepper Peanut oil Roux: 1/3 c all purpose flour 1/3 c peanut oil Trinity 2 green peppers (one green and one red or yellow), diced 4 ribs celery, diced 2 medium onions, diced 8 cloves of garlic, minced 1 T dried basil 1 T dried oregano 2 tsp cayenne 2 tsp black fine crushed black pepper 1 T salt 6 c chicken, turkey or pork stock Partially skin the thighs (I like to leave a little fat, adds to the flavor when browning). Dust with spiced flour. Brown the dusted thighs in peanut oil. I like peanut oil as it can take a pretty good beating, adds a nice nutty taste, and you can get it very hot without burning. Turn once and hardly move while they were browning. Remove thighs and place on paper towels. Brown the sausage coins. I like to get it a little toasty. It adds both flavor and texture to the dish. Time to make the roux. You may wish to review my photo essay (linked above) to see the process as it colors. The pan has been drained, but not scraped after the browning of the sausage and chicken. It is placed over very high heat (wide open on a normal burner, Flour and oil added; this mixture is stirred constantly. Scrape up the remainder of the meat as you go. Scrape hard and get it all loose or it will all burn and you will have to start over. First you will have the light roux. Sort of the color of a skinned almond. Medium Roux. Very light brown. At this point I have been stirring about 5 minutes. It is getting very hot. WARNING-This method of making Roux was popularized during Paul Prudhomme's stay as Head Chef at Commander's Palace in New Orleans. The kitchen staff came to call this type of roux "cajun napalm". If you splash and get it on you it will stick to you and burn you badly (if you try to wipe it off while it is hot the burn will just spread) so BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL. Dark Roux. Darker brown; approaching Hershey's chocolate syrup. Now we've gotten there. At this point (maybe 10 minutes in) the oil is just starting to smoke a little bit and I am ready to stop the process. Onion, celery, bell pepper and in. This stops the browning process with the flour and the oil. Stand back as you dump-it can be a pretty lively thing. You are, after all, pouring hot water into oil. At this point I have just mixed the veg and the roux evenly. The bottom was carefully scraped, as were the sides. Then I add the garlic and I turn the heat to medium low and slowly simmer with the top on, stirring and scraping occasionally. By adding now these spices will incorporate nicely with the veg mix and basically melt into the mix. Getting the veg to the right point will take about 15 minutes. Now is the time to add the garlic. Taste at this point and adjust spicing. (some like it hot, some not. I find that with this type of gumbo I do not prefer it so spicy. The veg, sausage, and especially the chicken all stand out on their own and don't need to be bammed to heavily with spice-but as always it is a matter of personal choice) Add 6-8 cups of stock, the chicken, and the sausage. It is all stirred well and brought to a boil while uncovered. Once it hits a boil, let boil for 5 min or so on low boil, cut the heat back down to medium low and simmer for one and a half hours with the lid on. Skim fat occasionally if you wish. There will not be much grease if you did the first two steps right and bought quality sausage. About ten minutes before finish of simmer time, add 1/2 cup coarsely chopped parsely and 6 or 8 chopped green onions (tops and bottoms). Ready to plate. Yessir Buddy! That's the stuff I was looking for (I wouldn't have showed it if I had screwed it up). It is a very nice color, thick but not too, and has a nice spicy tang to it while not being overpowering. You should be able to taste the veg, chicken, and sausage nicely and the three really are working together the way that they are supposed to. A nice spicy tang while not overpowering. Fit for Royalty. A bargain at any price. Keywords: Soup, Main Dish, Intermediate ( RG1186 )
  6. helenas

    Chicken confit by-product

    I made a quick chicken confit this Sunday. Here is an idea of the recipe: curing chicken thighs for an hour or so straight in the baking dish that holds thighs snugly; baking them covered in 325F for an hour skin down; baking them covered in 325F for an hour skin up; roasting them in 450F for 20 minutes or so skin up until skin is browned and crackling. The end result is divine. Now here is my question about this thing that is left after confiting. There is a layer of fat and whatever other pan juices. It's really a pity to throw this away. But how can i use this stuff? Thank you.
  7. HI, Are there any mail order sources for Chourico or Linguica other than Gaspars? Tim
  8. docsconz

    Bacon Based Dessert

    I had another wonderful meal last night at The Inn at Erlowest, one of my favorite restaurants. When the new dessert was described, I had to try it. It was called "The Bacon Experience." It consisted of a plate that on one side had three crisp circular bacon strips standing upright. On the bottom of each circle of bacon was a small quenelle of ice cream. The first was a bacon ice cream, the second spinach and the third orange. Interspersed around the plate were leaves of bacon-dusted "candied" spinach and there was a triangle of orange gelee over a shallot custard and finely chopped pecans. On top of that was backfat crisps. This topic presents an interesting, but limited discussion on using bacon in the context of desserts, but this was the first dessert I have experienced or seen in which bacon was the centerpiece component and the overriding theme of the dessert. The bacon ice cream was astounding and worked beautifully with the crispy bacon circle. It was a stunning introduction to the dessert. It was a fine lead-in to the spinach ice cream and then the orange ice cream eaten last. The other components of the plate also 'worked". The candied spinach would probably open up many new avenues for spinach consumption for spinach-phobic children. This dish brought my culinary day full circle as my day started with bacon and eggs for breakfast. It proved an extremely fun and enjoyable dessert. Though it won't displace chocolate from the pinnacle of my dessert/pastry experience, nor would I want to have it regularly(I would certainly have it again), it was a welcome surprise that added considerably to my overall experience of the meal (which was already quite wonderful). To me this is what creative cookery is all about. It doesn't have to be something I would necessarily want to eat all the time. It should be something that fits into a particular context and fulfills its intended purpose, i.e. tastes great, looks great and is fun. This is not mutually exclusive to more traditional fare. I believe each has its place.
  9. Combine the three different candles to make a BLT! Ben p.s. there is a bunch of other great bacon related stuff on this site.
  10. nolnacs

    Need some ideas for lomo

    I'd like to try my hand at making lomo. Does anyone here have suggestions for seasoning percentages or quantities? From what I have seen online, garlic and smoked paprika are common seasonings, but is there anything else I should be considering?
  11. Chez56

    LEM Meat grinders

    Has anyone used the LEM Meat grinders? I have been using the attachment on my Hobart mixer 20QT, but it does not quite do the job as weel as I would like. IE: clogging of some of the holes, not uniform grind etc. I'm not sure if this is due to sloppy tolerances of the die plates and blade or not. I always chill the grinder and make sure the meat is cold usually start off on a 3/4 die and go down to a 3/16. I'm curious if the commercial grinders are any better with this? I have been looking at the LEM 780 3/4 hp unit.
  12. Blue Cheese Creamed Spinach with Pancetta Serves 4 as Side. This is a popular side at our place. It serves four moderately, 2 generously. 4 slices of pancetta 1/2 medium yellow onion, chopped 1 T pine nuts 3 oz cream cheese 2 oz blue cheese or similar 1/2 tsp salt 6 oz baby spinach, washed and patted dry In a large, heavy frying pan cook pancetta till crisp but not brown. Remove pancetta from pan, reserve. Add onion to pancetta fat in pan, saute until transparent. Add pine nuts, salt and cheeses. Stir a bit, 1-2 minutes, then add spinach. Stir untill spinach is wilted and chese is completely melted. Serve immediately, topped with reserved pancetta slices. Keywords: Easy, Vegetables, Side ( RG870 )
  13. My charcuterier, Central Market, sells ends of their products. These are the tips of a ham hock, shoulder, sausage, etc. and I find them to be a great value. Prosciutto and bresaola ends are priced at $9.99/lb (considering that they sell San Daniele at $19.99 and bresaola at $29.99). Prosciutto ends are great to cook with: slice into small pieces and fry with scrambled eggs or use it to flavor a stock. I usually buy them with that intention but always end up eating too much of it straight. All other meat ends are $3.99/lb. This is usually turkey, ham, pastrami, and occasionally sausage. $3.99 is just a great deal for any kind of fully cooked meat. They sell boneless skinless chicken breast for more than that. And I actually prefer the taste of ends. On hams and turkeys, for example, you get much more delicious skin; on pastrami, more black pepper rub. I suspect that the employees snag the choicest ends as I never see anything like secola blue label prosciutto. Bresaola was the most expensive end I've ever seen.
  14. A Patric

    Confit de Porc

    Hi all, Here's a question, is there any culture that has used extra virgin olive oil to confit meat rather than it's own fat/lard, etc? Perhaps this has been done somewhere in one of the cuisines of the Mediterranean? I love the flavor of evoo, probably more than most animal fats, and I'm wondering if throwing some lean pork in a big pot of seasoned olive oil (pepper, garlic, various herbs, etc) and slowly cooking it at a low temp would result in something as delicious as the normal confit de porc? Aside from it being a bit cost-prohibitive due to the price of good evoo, is there any good reason not to try this? Have any of you tried it before? Thanks in advance for any thoughts.
  15. James Satriano

    confit jelly

    I made duck confit this past weekend and chilled the fat in an upside down mason jar in order to remove the "jelly" before storing the legs in the fat. Is there any good use for this wonderful looking jelly. I made a brown duck stock from the carcasses. Can I add the jelly to this? Should it be frozen and added to sauces or do I pitch it.
  16. torakris

    Boudin sausages

    I attempted to make boudin sausages last night even though I have neither seen nor eaten them before... The intro to the recipe just sounded so good! However they exploded on me, into a huge puffy mass. They still tasted quite good but what did I do wrong? Should I have stuffed them into the casings a little bit looser? Did I steam them over two high a heat? I used medium and cooked them on metal steamer with many small holes. Is the pork mixture always cooked before stuffing? I used quite a bit of fat, actually more than the recipe called for but they were still on the dry side.... The recipe called for the cooked meat to be ground with the attachment with 1/4 inch holes, but it turned out quite smooth like cheap tuna fish. Are there supposed to be no chunks in it?
  17. Chad

    Re-Smoking Bacon

    Here's an interesting little science experiment. I have a freezer full of pig. Really. At one of my son's baseball games this summer one of the moms leaned over and said, "Hey, Chad, you wanna buy a pig?" I said "Sure!" After all, how often do you get asked that question? As it turns out, her boys raise pigs for the 4H competition at the state fair every year. They sell the pigs and have them processed. So I bought a pig. Actually half a pig -- but it did take a blue ribbon. Anyway, I got a great pork shoulder, some gigantic, Flintstone sized pork chops, lots o' ribs, about 20 pounds of various sausages and lots and lots of bacon. Yay! Everything else has been chock full of porcine goodness, but the bacon is just plain boring. I don't think they cured it long enough or smoked it long enough. It tastes like pork, but not like bacon. Major bummer. However, on the Cooking from Charcuterie thread someone mentioned that Ruhlman & Polcyn recommend hot smoking bacon and that you can hot smoke it after it has been cold smoked. Ding! The little light goes on. Maybe I could resmoke my bacon. Worth a try, anyway. So I had a free afternoon, some applewood chips and a willingness to experiment. I figure that even if everything goes wrong, I have a rack of grilled bacon and that can't be bad. At the moment I have a pound of bacon and about half a pound of cured jowl on a roasting rack in my Weber. There's a big roasting pan of water underneath to act as a heat brake and a handful of hot coals and soaked applewood chips smoking away. I think I'm going to let it go until the bacon is actually cooked. I kept the temperature about 200 degrees for the first hour, now I've opened the vents and plan on letting it go for another 45 minutes to an hour. Anyone ever tried this? Oh, the bacon is going on what I hope to be my finest sandwich creation -- grilled pseudo-jerk chicken, applewood smoked bacon, homemade aioli, arugula and cherry tomatoes on freshly baked french rolls. Should be interesting. I'll keep you posted. Chad
  18. Jinmyo

    Sausages

    I adore sausages. The ancient alchemy of rescuing and transforming meat that would otherwise be unappetizing into delicious luvly sausages is surely one of humanity's greatest achievements. Luvly, luvly sau... Um. Do you like sausages? If so, what is your favourite? What is the best way to prepare them?
  19. Richard Kilgore

    Tomato Confit

    I have a surplus of roma tomatoes and want to make tomato confit. Any suggestions for what to add to the crock pot...other than the tomatoes, salt and olive oil? Maybe a sprig of rosemary?
  20. silverbrow

    Beef sausages

    Beef sausages Serves 8 as Appetizer. Most recipes for homemade sausages are centred around pork. For those who don't/can't eat pork this is a good alternative. Becuase beef tends to be drier than pork this requires a relatively high fat level. I was advised by Len Poli at http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/index.htm to work on the basis of at least 30% fat, personally I found even then the sausages were a bit too dry so I upped it a bit, I go for just under 50% of the weight of bola in fat. The onion will also help with moistness. 500 g Bola/beef shoulder 240 g Beef fat 100 g Onion 20 g Salt 2-1/2 g Pepper 1-1/4 g Smoked pepper 1-1/4 g Cumin seed powder Collagen sausage skins as reqd The recipe makes 16 sausages, based on sausages of approx 10cm long. Put the bola and beef fat into the freezer to cool but not freeze. When cold combine chunks of bola and fat and mince. Try to use a proper meat mincer as this will give the desired texture. Finely dice the onion and prepare the seasoning (salt, pepper, smoker pepper and cumin seed powder. Combine onion, seasoning and mince beef and fat in a bowl. It is worth heating a pan and cooking a patty of the mixture for taste. Alter seasoning if required. A word of warning - the minced meat with onion and seasoning will be left to sit in the fridge overnight so the tastes will change slightly. Ideally the mixture should be left in a fridge overnight, at the very least it should be placed in the fridge to cool down before it is stuffed into the sausage skins. To stuff the sausages follow instructions on your mincer/stuffer. When it comes to cooking the sausages place them in a hot pan/griddle/grill and turn the heat down relatively low and cook for a long period of time. Sausages are not steaks that cook quickly. Give them time to cook, don't hurry things. Keywords: Kosher, Intermediate, Beef ( RG1379 )
  21. whifflechef

    berkshire pork sausage

    So I am partnering with a local pork producer who specializes in amazing berkshire pork but also raises lamb and some grassfed beef (DWFarms). I have offered to make them some sausage recipes to sell at the farmers market. The sausage they have made so far has some texture issues. I assumed that being a leaner pork and a very small farm they were using mostly scrap and did not follow the proper ratios for sausage. My first batch with a proper lean meat to fat ratio as well as a batch with an increased fat ratio also had this texture issue, dry and crumbly. Obviously it is a fat emulsification issue. I tried a mousseline route with heavy cream but no panada. Besides the next step of adding a panada does anyone have any suggestions? Adding any pork besides theirs is not a possibility.
  22. Emily_R

    Really Good Chicken Sausage?

    Hi all -- Just wondering if anyone a) thinks it is possible to make a really good chicken (or turkey, I suppose) sausage and b) if so, if you have a recipe you'd share. I typically have shied away from poultry sausage, figuring it just couldn't be as good as luscious fatty pork... But then I figured, I'd actually wind up eating sausage more often if there was a tasty version that wasn't made with luscious fatty pork... Thanks in advance! Emily
  23. ingridsf

    Bacon ice cream on ICA

    Cora, who lost big on taste to challenger Neal Fraser in the taste category, created an…unusual dish during Pork Battle last night. The dish also included sautéed blueberries, a sweet little pork cutlet, and a streusel topping composed of flour and lard, among other things. Only ICA Judge Harry Smith loved the bacon ice cream; even Steingarten demurred, and visibly calmed down when Burke soothed him with crispy pork skin, a more conventional fat-delivery system. The third Judge, 80s celebrity author turned wine writer Jay McInerney, said the bacon ice cream freaked him out. Well, scaffolding masquerading as shoulder pads freaked me out, Jay. We all have our fears. Am I the only one who saw it? Because I would have thought the words, “bacon + ice cream,” would spark lardophiles and dreamyfrozendessertophiles into a spirited debate. edited because I messed up on the challenger's name.
  24. I used to get great bacon mail order from Thielen's in Minnesota, but they don't ship out of state any more. Any suggestions? Thanks.
  25. MikeHartnett

    Polish Sausage

    I'm originally from Chicago, living in New Orleans for the time being. A coworker, also originally from Illinois, asked me to pick her up some Polish Sausage on my upcoming trip home. I'll be based in the south suburbs, but I should be in the city a fair amount, and I'm willing to travel wherever. So where can I find the absolute best -bar none- Polish Sausage?
×