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Found 434 results

  1. nolnacs

    Need some ideas for lomo

    I'd like to try my hand at making lomo. Does anyone here have suggestions for seasoning percentages or quantities? From what I have seen online, garlic and smoked paprika are common seasonings, but is there anything else I should be considering?
  2. scott123

    Confit Geography

    I've been thinking about confit lately and how the duck begins surrounded by fat, but, over time, it releases it own juices so that the top of the pot is always cooking in fat, but the very bottom layer, to an extent, stews in it's own juices. Has anyone noticed the bottom layer, the layer below the water line, tasting any different from the top? Anyone notice a difference in texture?
  3. Daniel Duane

    slow-cooker duck confit

    Can't remember who suggested this to me, but I tried making confit in my All-Clad Slow Cooker last night. Put in the legs and fat before bed, set the cooker to High for 8 hours, woke up to great (although perhaps a smidge too falling-off-the-bone) confit. Great application for this not-so-little appliance.
  4. Stanley Feder

    Sausages

    In September 2005 I started a business called "Simply Sausage, Inc.™". I'm making fresh sausages in Landover, MD, (USDA-approved facility). I love sausages but want to eat only the best. One essential in making great sausages is the use of the highest quality ingredients. In fact, I'm somewhat fanatical about that. For example, I use only pork shoulders for my pork sausages; and in some cases I use only shoulders from certified 100% purebred Berkshire hogs. (Berkshire pork is incredibly flavorful, but I digress). I use gray sea salt from Brittany and the most flavorful Hungarian paprika available. I'm willing to offer advice to amateur sausage-makers. I'm interested in learning to what extent eGullet members think of sausages as providing good eating and the ways in which they like to eat them (what meals? how prepared?). I would appreciate hearing your views.
  5. culinary bear

    Confit Duck

    I'm in the process of making confit duck, so I thought I'd share my technique for doing so; it's a slightly modified version of the one I make in the restaurant. I hope this encourages people to try making it, as it's a wonderful thing to have in the storecupboard. I'd be interested in hearing how other people's techniques vary from my own. You'll need: 10 duck legs (I use French Babrary) a lemon, sliced into 6 or so slices an orange, ditto a couple of dozen sprigs of thyme half a dozen bay leaves a head of garlic about 8oz / 220g medium coarse salt about 2kg / 4lb duck or goose fat (I use goose) 1) In a plastic or otherwise non-reactive contatiner that'll fit in the fridge, place everything apart from the goose fat, and mix with the hands to combine. Leave in the fridge for 12-16 hours. 2) Take the legs out of the fridge. The salt will have dissolved and there'll be some fluid in the bottom of the container. 3) In warm water, rinse the duck legs, and leave them to drain. Rinse and drain the herbs, garlic, orange and lemon. 4) Place half the herbs, garlic and fruit slices in the bottom of a heavy pot (I use a cast-iron Le Creuset pot) 5) Make the first layer of duck legs, overlapping like this. 6) Place the fifth leg in to make a complete circle. 7) Fill in the middle with the remaining herbs/garlic/fruit. 8) Make the second layer of five legs in the same way as the first. 9) Just cover with warm duck/goose fat. 10) Cover with a cartouche of aluminium foil. It's imporatant that the foil doesn't overlap the edge of the pot otherwise the fat may spill over upon cooking. 11) Place in the oven at 90C (200F) for 12-14 hours. The lid should be slightly ajar, as shown, and it's good practice to place a tray underneath the pot to avoid any spillage catching fire on the oven floor. I learned this the hard way. If there's any interest, I'll put up pics of the potting process when I do that tomorrow. Hope this proves of interest...
  6. hansjoakim

    Storing natural hog casings

    Hi, A friend of mine purchased almost 15 meters of natural hog casings for me at a local butcher yesterday. The butcher told him that they usually stored their casings in a brine under refrigeration. I am planning on using the casings in a couple of weeks time, and I have for now put them in a 5% brine in my fridge. Ruhlman and Polcyn's "Charcuterie" suggests that natural casings stored in a brine will keep roughly a month in the refrigerator, and I guess I should be able to use the casings within a month's time. However, do I need to use a stronger brine to keep them that long, or will a 5% brine do? Will an overnight soak be sufficient time to rid the casings of the salty flavour before filling? This is my first time at making the real deal at home, so any thoughts and advice are very welcome! Thanks!
  7. Short of purchasing a professional deli slicer for several hundred dollars, devoting half your kitchen counter space to it, and spending an hour cleaning its parts after each use, what options are there for cutting deli meats super-thin? Even with my best knives, I can't do it. Can a sushi chef do it? Is it even possible to do this without a rapidly spinning blade? Is there some cheap device I don't know about that accomplishes the task with aplomb, or even without aplomb? Of course you can get things sliced when you purchase them, but in my experience they degrade rapidly once sliced. So I'd love to be able to do it to order at home.
  8. MatthewB

    Browning whole sausages

    Last night I tried out Arthur Swartz's recipe for pasta fazool. He's fairly insistent that one brown whole sausages by starting the sausages in a cold pan with a bit of oil & then browning them over medium-low to low heat. The fresh sausages I used were "arced" so it was quite difficult--but still enjoyable--to keep moving the sausages at weird angles in order to get the middle & ends of the sides that were arced. Any techniques to make browning whole "arced" sausages easier?
  9. Welcome back to our popular eGullet Cook-Off Series. Our last Cook-Off, Hash, took us into a heated discussion of the meat of the matter--should it be chopped, hashed, sliced, diced, or chunked. Click here, for our Hash discussion, and the answers to all of your questions about this beloved diner staple. The complete eG Cook-Off Index can be found here. Today we’re launching eGullet Cook-Off 59: Cured, Brined, Smoked and Salted Fish. Drying fish is a method of preservation that dates back to Ancient times, but more recently, (let’s say a mere 500 years ago or so), salt mining became a major industry in Europe and salt was a fast and economical way of preserving fish. Curing agents like nitrates were introduced in the 19th century, furthering the safety and taste of preserved fish. Where I live in the Pacific Northwest, Native Americans have been preserving fish and seafood for millennia. While we are best known for our ruby-red, oily-rich, smoked salmon, other species of fish found in the Pacific and in our streams are delicious when cured and smoked including Halibut, Sablefish and Idaho Rainbow Trout. And don’t think that you can’t smoke shellfish, alder-smoked Dungeness Crab is a wondrous Pacific Northwest delicacy that evokes memories of crab roasting over a driftwood fire on the beach. Another method of preserving fish is to bath the beauties in a brine—a combination of water, sugar, salt and spices that adds flavor and moisture to fish before it is dried or smoked. And speaking of smoked fish, you can do it in a small pan on top of the stove, in a cast iron drum, a barbecue pit, an old woodshed or a fancy digital smoker. The methods and flavors produced by smoking fish are endless. Old-fashioned ways of preserving fish, (while adequate at the time), aren't always the best method today. Today's technology provides us with the tools to create cured fish that is moist, succulent, tender and with a hint of smoke. The Modernist movement has certainly played a role in bringing this age-old craft into the 21st century, so for the avant-garde in the crowd, show us your creative wizardry for preserving fish the "modern" way. Cured, Brined, Smoked or Salted, the art of preserving fish opens us up to limitless possibilities that transcend the boundaries of cuisine and culture. So let’s sew-up the holes in our fishnets, scrub the barnacles off the rowboat and set out to sea in search of some delectable fish to cure, brine, smoke and salt.
  10. wannabechef

    Pancetta Substitute?

    Does anyone have a non-pork suggestion as a substitute for pancetta? I have a recipe which I want to make, but my wife doesn't eat pork. It's a pasta dish which involves browning the pancetta until nice and crispy, and then using the fat in the rest of the dish. So I need some kind of meat which will accomplish a similar task. I guess I won't be able to get the exact same flavor, but I'd like to try something at least. Any ideas? Thanks! ~WB
  11. Marlene

    Onion Confit

    Onion Confit this recipe is really a collaboration of some of the finest of eGullet, including fifi and woodburner. I am indebted to both of them. For without them, I should never have known the joys of confit! 1/4 c butter 1/4 c EVOO 1 T demi glace 3 T sherry and or port 1 T brown sugar 7 large onions sliced, enough to fill crock pot optional, thyme, bay leaf Throw everything in the crockpot and stir it up. Put crock pot on high till you go to bed. Stir before going to bed. Turn crock pot down to low for overnight. Turn crock pot back up to high for another couple of hours when you wake up. Time about 18 hours all told. Note: Onions may vary as to water content. The onions used in this recipe are regular cooking onions. Keywords: Side ( RG1010 )
  12. Butternut Squash with Corn, Spinach, Bacon, Onions, and Basil Serves 8 as Side. Thanks to MatthewB for turning me on to this simple recipe, which originally appeared in the November 1998 Bon Appétit. I'm sure that it's a given on eGullet, but I'd still like to emphasize that the fresher the ingredients, the better. (The original recipe specified packaged spinach and frozen corn.) Proportions can be adjusted at will. I made this for the 2003 Heartland Gathering in Grand Rapids using thick-cut farm bacon, with the other ingredients coming straight from the GR Farmer's Market. Outstanding! ½ lb bacon 1 large onion (about 2 cups chopped) 1 large butternut squash 9-10 oz spinach leaves 4-6 ears corn or 1 lb frozen kernels ½ cup or more chopped fresh basil salt and pepper Prep: Chop bacon crosswise, ~1/3-1/2" wide. Chop onion into fine dice. Peel squash (and seed, if using round segment) and cut into ~1/3" dice. Wash and coarsely chop spinach, if needed; baby spinach can be left whole. If using fresh corn, remove husk and silk and cut kernels from cob. Wait to chop the basil until it's time to add it. Cook: In a large pot or sauté pan over medium heat, cook the bacon until it is just getting crisp. Add the onion and squash and sauté until the squash is just tender (10-12 min.). Add the corn. If using frozen corn or older fresh corn, cook for a few minutes before adding the spinach; if using very fresh corn, add the spinach at the same time. Cook until the spinach wilts. Chop, then stir in the basil. Add salt (careful!) and pepper to taste. Keywords: Side, Easy, Vegetables, American ( RG737 )
  13. torakris

    making sausages

    My husband really wants to make his own sausages and he asked me to pick up a sausage maker/stuffer on my trip to the US. I haven't been able to find one in stores anywhere and just now looked on ebay and there are tons there, I have no idea of what exactly I should be looking for. Are there any goods brands? anything I should know? I really don't have much more than $40 to spend....
  14. smithi

    Frisee Aux Lardons

    I really enjoyed this salad at Pastis but they recently took it off the menu (and won't fill a special request for it). I was wondering if anyone has had a good version elsewhere. I recently tried Brasserie's version...it was BAD. Dressing seemed to be all vinegar and I don't even think they put an egg on the salad (or anywhere else on the plate).
  15. forum. Hi guys. Haven't been around for a long while, but I've been curing some pork confit, made P. Wolfert style (original edition), and I have been racking my brains for something different (read: un-bean-related) to do with it. I got an eGullet email and I figured I'd post a topic here. Only to find that two prominent topics are charcuterie and the new edition of Cooking of Southwest France! Unfortunately, I do not have the stamina to read all 24 pages of these two topics to ferret out any suggestions. I did see M. Ruhlman's suggestion to treat it like a leg of duck confit and saute a good slice of it. Alas, I used country-style spareribs, and I deboned them after poaching to fit them in the pot. So that's right out. Any way, any suggestions? The stuff has been curing since before Christmas so it should be good and confited. I thought of making ravioli (nah) or perhaps some beggars' purse type thingee with chard leaves (mebbe). I'd love to hear what you good people might have up your sleeve. Great to be back, yr humble servant, essvee
  16. Pasta con Broccoli Rabe, Pancetta e Pignolia Serves 6 as Main Dish. This is what I made for the eGullet pasta feast in Raleigh, NC, on 2/7/04: Ingredients 2 bunches Broccoli Rabe 1/2 head of garlic, peeled and chopped 1/4 c. olive oil, plus more as needed 1 tsp. crushed red chile 1/4 c. pine nuts 1/4 lb. pancetta Aged Asiago cheese 1. Make or procure some flat, wide-ish pasta, whatever you like. 2. Toast pine nuts in 400 degree oven or in dry skillet, taking care not to burn. 3. Crisp pancetta and set aside to cool, then crumble. 4. Blanch broccoli rabe, squeeze out excess liquid, and chop coarsely. Mince larger stems. 5. Heat olive oil over low to medium heat, add chopped garlic and saute until garlic looks cooked through but not brown. 6. Have pasta almost ready at this point, i.e. about 2 minutes more cooking time. 7. Put chopped rabe in saute pan, mix with garlic and add crushed chiles. When pasta is cooked through, drain and add to pan. Mix thoroughly. 8. Plate pasta, garnish with toasted pine nuts and crumbled pancetta, and grate asiago on top. Drizzle with EVOO, if desired. Yum! Keywords: Main Dish, Italian, Appetizer, Dinner, Intermediate, Vegetables ( RG864 )
  17. Ufimizm

    SE Asian Flavored Sausage help

    I am interested in trying to make a SE Asian Flavored Sausage. I am planning on going 80% pork and 20% fat and make a 5lb batch. I am looking at using all or most of the following ingredients: fish sauce, dried shrimp, lemongrass, ginger, garlic, palm sugar, Kaffir Lime leave, Lime Juice, black pepper, bird chile's, cilantro, and coconut milk. The few recipes I have found out there seem very mild on most of the seasonings. I am wondering if anyone else has tried this before and has some suggestions on where to start with proportions for the spices. If nobody has really done this before I was wondering if anyone had suggestions on how to balance the level of salt with the fish sauce. I was also debating on whether to use all the seasonings raw, or to make curry paste first and then add that to the meat to make the sausage. Any advice would be appreciated.
  18. Pallee

    Bacon Cookies

    Bacon Cookies Serves 30 as Amuse. Savory bacon cookies that go well with stews, soups, or to make your dog very happy! 4 slices chopped bacon 2 c AP flour 1 pinch salt 1 pinch black pepper 1/2 c chilled butter 1 egg, lightly beaten 3 T heavy cream 1 egg yolk, beaten Saute the bacon bits until not quite crispy. Drain and cool. Mix flour, salt and pepper and cut in the butter. Mix in the egg and cream, just to combine. Add the bacon and form the dough into a log about 1 1/2" diameter. Wrap in plastic wrap and chill til firm. Preheat oven to 350'. Slice cookies and brush tops with yolk. Bake until brown (about 15 minutes) and cool on a rack. ( RG1718 )
  19. tinytim

    Bacon wrapped filet

    Okay, I know this is normaly done in a broiler.... However I was wondering if anyone has any tips to getting the bacon crisp using a flattop grill. I have been just rolling them around for a minute or two but that seems like the least efficient way possible. Would it be possible to parcook the bacon just short of crisp or something along those lines? Any suggestions would be welcomed.
  20. When we lived in Mexico City we could drive to Toluca, 40kms to the west and buy bright green sausage at just about every market stall and from homes along the way. When I say green I mean emerald. About the size of BBQ sausage here in houston and fresh not smoked or dried. I've made Diane Kennedy's green sausage and it's nothing like what I'm looking for. Anybody got a source in Texas?
  21. Hi everyone, I just had to re-sign up since it's been awhile I wanted to let you all know the awesome news that I will be releasing a book at the end of the year about my time learning the charcuterie and butchery of Spain. It's called Charcutería: The Soul of Spain, and will have a foreword by James Beard award-winning chef José Andrés. The book is going to have a bunch of traditional techniques and recipes for Spanish charcuterie and pork butchery, as well as recipes and other little tricks I picked up working with the folks in the Extremaduran countryside. My photog and I just got back from visiting Spain for the photoshoot and the guys up in Asturias did a little video about it. Here's the link to the video: http://www.whereisasturias.com/?p=6602 And a link to our FB page (Lots more photos... please like!): https://www.facebook.com/charcuteriaspain?ref=ts&fref=ts Please feel free to write me if you have any requests or questions for the book--really trying to make something that my fellow meatheads and sausage nerds can get into. Ciao, jeff PS: As a little offering to my hopefully-new eGullet pals here's a sexy photo from the Jamón slicing shoot. Tatoos and meat...
  22. Toliver

    The Bacon Flowchart

    Are you hungry? The Bacon Flowchart Sheer pork genius.
  23. Trev

    Another lemon confit question

    I did a search here already but failed to come up with an answer to this question, so here it is. I started some lemon confit about 6-8 weeks ago using the basic recipe from Ruhlman's Charcuterie, which is just lemons and course salt. Today I went to inspect them and maybe rotate them for a more even cure. What I found was quite a bit of liquid in the bottom of the container. This brine seems to be inhibiting the curing process for the lemons that are in the bottom. Is it advisable to drain the excess brine, change the salt or maybe just leave it alone? The lemons in the top 2/3 of the container are taking on a nice tan colour, which I understand is the desired effect. Thanks for any help.
  24. davidcross

    Mold on Bresaola?

    This is elk bresaola 3 weeks after hanging in the drying chamber, and losing weight as expected. The growth on the outside seems mainly green on the outside of the netting. Probably safe... or pitch it? And if safe, wash or spray with anything? Strip the netting off, or...? Thank you
  25. Since there are so many bakers around here who know their sugar much better than me, I'm turning to y'all for help. I'd like to make a bacon macaron. My first thought is a regular almond macaron cookie with a milk chocolate/bacon filling a lá Vosges Mo's Bacon Bar. I'm not quite sure how to make the filling though. Would I just temper some milk chocolate and add crumbled bacon? Or is there something else I should be doing? I'm also open to other ideas for this bacon macaron idea if anyone has any.
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