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Found 434 results

  1. Fat Guy

    Bacon Aphorisms

    A day without bacon is like a day without bacon.
  2. bilrus

    Biscuits and Sausage Gravy Help

    I have been craving biscuits with sausage gravy. I can figure out the biscuits, but can't find anything about how to make the gravy. Anyone have any ideas or places they can point me? I thank you in advance. My arteries - not so much.
  3. Alright so as of a few months ago, I decided to take an impromptu trip to Europe--mostly unplanned but with several priorities set in mind: find the best food and locate the most game-changing ice cream spots on the grounds of each city I sought out for. One of the greatest, most architecturally unique and divine cities I have visited thus far has gotta be Vienna, Austria. But what in the heck is there to eat over there?! (you might ask). 'Cause I sure as hell didn't know. So, I desperately reached out to a local Viennese friend of mine, who knows and understands my avid passion for all things edible, and she immediately shot back some must-have food dishes. Doing a bit of research beforehand, I knew I had to try the classic "Kasekreiner". Please forgive my German if I spelled that wrong. But no matter how you say it- say it with passion, because passion is just about all I felt when I ate it. Translated: it basically means cheese sausage. Honestly, what is there not to love about those two words. Even if that's not necessarily your go-to, do me a favor and give it a shot. Trust me, you won't regret it. A classic Austrian pork sausage with pockets of melty cheese, stuffed into a crisp French Baguette. No ketchup necessary (...and as an American, that's saying a lot). YUM. Best spot to try out this one-of-a-kind treat?! Bitzinger bei der Albertina – Würstelstand. Now here's a shot of me with my one true love in front of this classic Viennese green-domed building-- Karlskirche. Now, go check it.
  4. I'm in the mood for Spanish food, and a surprising large number of recipes in Penelope Casas' early book call for blood sausage. Not a lot of morcilla. And it's usually optional. But I want to make the dish right! Is there anything I can use to substitute (I could get blood from the Asian market, but it's not cooked)? Anything else that would get close? Are there any sources for morcilla in the U.S.? And if I found a supply of morcilla, is this something that I could freeze?
  5. Jinmyo

    Sausages

    I adore sausages. The ancient alchemy of rescuing and transforming meat that would otherwise be unappetizing into delicious luvly sausages is surely one of humanity's greatest achievements. Luvly, luvly sau... Um. Do you like sausages? If so, what is your favourite? What is the best way to prepare them?
  6. blackbox

    Dry Link Sausage

    Anyone doing diy link sausage- please point me in the right direction to find some interesting combos for sausage making. I've been tasked with coming up with 6 interesting sausages this week, both exciting and intimidating as I've never made sausage before! We have a kitchenaid mixer with the grinding and stuffing accessories, and I've picked up some casings as well. Thanks in advance for your ideas and suggestions! Warmly, Shai
  7. LoveToEatATL

    Shrimp with Bacon, Chilis and Mint

    Hi All, Does anyone have this recipe from Gourmet Magazine? I'm supposed to teach an informal cooking class next Wednesday and thought it would be the perfect dish to start with. This particular Gourmet has a peach tart on the cover and has recipes from Thomas Keller in it. Help? Thanks! Patti
  8. wannabechef

    Pancetta Substitute?

    Does anyone have a non-pork suggestion as a substitute for pancetta? I have a recipe which I want to make, but my wife doesn't eat pork. It's a pasta dish which involves browning the pancetta until nice and crispy, and then using the fat in the rest of the dish. So I need some kind of meat which will accomplish a similar task. I guess I won't be able to get the exact same flavor, but I'd like to try something at least. Any ideas? Thanks! ~WB
  9. Chez56

    LEM Meat grinders

    Has anyone used the LEM Meat grinders? I have been using the attachment on my Hobart mixer 20QT, but it does not quite do the job as weel as I would like. IE: clogging of some of the holes, not uniform grind etc. I'm not sure if this is due to sloppy tolerances of the die plates and blade or not. I always chill the grinder and make sure the meat is cold usually start off on a 3/4 die and go down to a 3/16. I'm curious if the commercial grinders are any better with this? I have been looking at the LEM 780 3/4 hp unit.
  10. NoviceModernistCook

    Canning (Jarring) Duck Confit

    Sorry if this has been written about so far, but I looked and could not find it. I am about to make a large bit of Duck Confit, and curious what is the process to can (in a jars) the confit. I read the Duck Confit thread, and the writer stated you could jar them and it would last, but it was light in detail since that was not the actual topic he was writing about. I am finding it hard to find actual information on the web or in preserving books to actually preserving the cofit. Here are my questions if anyone can help.... 1. How long do i boil the jars to ensure everything is sterile. ( i plan on using the smallest Ball jars ) 2. Can I keep the preserved confit in a basement or cool place versus in the fridge. My point in preserving this is to keep from the fridge. 3. Any idea how long it will last, or i guess how long until the layer of duck fat on the top will last before it spoils/goes rancid ? 4. Can i use a water bath (sous vide or without bag) to heat the jars? I do not have a pressure cooker but do have a Polyscience Immersion Circulator. 5. If yes on the Polyscience Immersion Circulator, any idea on temp etc. Any luck with bags or no bags? Thanks for any help !
  11. I have a confession to make. I've never used my meat grinder. It just lurks in my cabinet, glaring at me from behind the box of coffee filters. Am I a bad person? And if I wanted, say, to make sausage, what kind is good to start with? Do you have a favorite recipe? Chad (snacking on last night's andouille cornbread, mmmm)
  12. whifflechef

    berkshire pork sausage

    So I am partnering with a local pork producer who specializes in amazing berkshire pork but also raises lamb and some grassfed beef (DWFarms). I have offered to make them some sausage recipes to sell at the farmers market. The sausage they have made so far has some texture issues. I assumed that being a leaner pork and a very small farm they were using mostly scrap and did not follow the proper ratios for sausage. My first batch with a proper lean meat to fat ratio as well as a batch with an increased fat ratio also had this texture issue, dry and crumbly. Obviously it is a fat emulsification issue. I tried a mousseline route with heavy cream but no panada. Besides the next step of adding a panada does anyone have any suggestions? Adding any pork besides theirs is not a possibility.
  13. I had pretty much just discovered poaching chicken breasts in wine when I discovered sous vide and drove down that road for a while. Then I read about various confits. So now I'm wondering if, beyond the obvious differences of cooking medium and trading liquids, if there really is any real fundamental difference between the three. If I brine my pork ribs and then cook them sous vide, could I not just poach them in a brine? Thomas Keller has apparently hit upon poaching lobster in butter in a sous vide bath. Could this be called a confit? Since all three can be oxygen free, do the safety procedures applied to sous vide work for poaching and/or confit?
  14. My charcuterier, Central Market, sells ends of their products. These are the tips of a ham hock, shoulder, sausage, etc. and I find them to be a great value. Prosciutto and bresaola ends are priced at $9.99/lb (considering that they sell San Daniele at $19.99 and bresaola at $29.99). Prosciutto ends are great to cook with: slice into small pieces and fry with scrambled eggs or use it to flavor a stock. I usually buy them with that intention but always end up eating too much of it straight. All other meat ends are $3.99/lb. This is usually turkey, ham, pastrami, and occasionally sausage. $3.99 is just a great deal for any kind of fully cooked meat. They sell boneless skinless chicken breast for more than that. And I actually prefer the taste of ends. On hams and turkeys, for example, you get much more delicious skin; on pastrami, more black pepper rub. I suspect that the employees snag the choicest ends as I never see anything like secola blue label prosciutto. Bresaola was the most expensive end I've ever seen.
  15. Stanley Feder

    Sausages

    In September 2005 I started a business called "Simply Sausage, Inc.™". I'm making fresh sausages in Landover, MD, (USDA-approved facility). I love sausages but want to eat only the best. One essential in making great sausages is the use of the highest quality ingredients. In fact, I'm somewhat fanatical about that. For example, I use only pork shoulders for my pork sausages; and in some cases I use only shoulders from certified 100% purebred Berkshire hogs. (Berkshire pork is incredibly flavorful, but I digress). I use gray sea salt from Brittany and the most flavorful Hungarian paprika available. I'm willing to offer advice to amateur sausage-makers. I'm interested in learning to what extent eGullet members think of sausages as providing good eating and the ways in which they like to eat them (what meals? how prepared?). I would appreciate hearing your views.
  16. IndyRob

    Sous Vide, Poaching and Confit

    Sous vide, poaching and confit share some obvious similarities and differences. But what about the not so obvious? If I have brined some pork, will poaching in the brine be the same as sous vide-ing the brined pork? Thomas Keller uses a hybrid of confit and sous vide for lobster by adding some beurre monte to the sous vide bag. Where are the lines clear and where are they blurry?
  17. Short of purchasing a professional deli slicer for several hundred dollars, devoting half your kitchen counter space to it, and spending an hour cleaning its parts after each use, what options are there for cutting deli meats super-thin? Even with my best knives, I can't do it. Can a sushi chef do it? Is it even possible to do this without a rapidly spinning blade? Is there some cheap device I don't know about that accomplishes the task with aplomb, or even without aplomb? Of course you can get things sliced when you purchase them, but in my experience they degrade rapidly once sliced. So I'd love to be able to do it to order at home.
  18. hansjoakim

    Storing natural hog casings

    Hi, A friend of mine purchased almost 15 meters of natural hog casings for me at a local butcher yesterday. The butcher told him that they usually stored their casings in a brine under refrigeration. I am planning on using the casings in a couple of weeks time, and I have for now put them in a 5% brine in my fridge. Ruhlman and Polcyn's "Charcuterie" suggests that natural casings stored in a brine will keep roughly a month in the refrigerator, and I guess I should be able to use the casings within a month's time. However, do I need to use a stronger brine to keep them that long, or will a 5% brine do? Will an overnight soak be sufficient time to rid the casings of the salty flavour before filling? This is my first time at making the real deal at home, so any thoughts and advice are very welcome! Thanks!
  19. tommy

    duck confit and cheese

    i'm considering a duck confit quesadilla of sorts for the superbowl festivities. prolly with a fruit (mango) salsa, as duck likes sweet fruits. i'm having a hard time coming up with a cheese or cheese blend. i'm of the opinion that cheddar or even jack will overpower, or at the very least, won't compliment the duck. a brief search on google returned Oaxaca cheese, which is a white cow's milk cheese (from mexico of course of course). but i'm thinking i won't be able to locate this on a sunday in NJ. any thoughts on what kind of cheese duck confit might like? no cheese perhaps? a fruit puree instead? i dunno. help a guy out, could ya?
  20. dave43

    Dry Cured Salumi

    I have recently become obsessed with Charcuterie. It started with a plate at Craftsman in Minneapolis made in house by the chef. I found a little spot in Duluth, Minnesota named Northern Waters Smokehaus making salumi that recently entered their wares in Batali's Salumi contest in Seattle and won top prize. Their salumi is incredible but I would like to branch out to the big boys like Fra'Mani and Salumi. I found a little spot in my hometown in Minneapolis that sells Salumi's selection at $25 a pound. This seems expensive but I have no idea what they charge in Seattle. Is this in line? I am a liitle cash strapped but am looking for suggestions. Anyone know of good Salumi that has reasonable shipping charges and prices?
  21. le singe qui rit

    Morteau Sausage

    I just ate some morteau sausage for lunch - it was lightly-smoked and I got if from the cooked meat counter of selfridges, but it seemed pretty raw... are you supposed to cook it? If so I might be in trouble.. would someone please clarify (quickly! i might not have long left...)
  22. Tim Dolan

    Best way to cook pancetta?

    I consider myself an advanced beginner, sometimes intermediate type cook. I can make a mean risotto and have no problem cooking steak to temp. I'm good at the fairly straightforward stuff. When I cook pancetta, the only thing I do with it is brown it in a frying pan then add it to whatever I'm using. However I had dinner at a pretty good restaurant the other night and had a dish that had pancetta that melted like butter when it hit my tongue. I just sat there dumbfounded like "damn, I wish I could make pancetta like that..." I'm thinking that soft, meltingly tender pancetta mixed into risotto or mashed potatoes would be nothing short of sublime. Anyone know what I'm talking about?
  23. torakris

    Sausages in Japan

    In the Nathan's Famous thread http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=34814 wesza said: I always was impressed with the many varieties of Sausages available that were actually made in Japan. They even had a excellent Hot Dog that was made from Tuna that was comparable to a Hebrew National Frank that was used as the model at the Japanese owned Factory located in Taiwan. It was amazing how similar in taste and texture they tasted to compared to the real thing. Wonder if they are still available. Irwin
  24. A Patric

    Confit de Porc

    Hi all, Here's a question, is there any culture that has used extra virgin olive oil to confit meat rather than it's own fat/lard, etc? Perhaps this has been done somewhere in one of the cuisines of the Mediterranean? I love the flavor of evoo, probably more than most animal fats, and I'm wondering if throwing some lean pork in a big pot of seasoned olive oil (pepper, garlic, various herbs, etc) and slowly cooking it at a low temp would result in something as delicious as the normal confit de porc? Aside from it being a bit cost-prohibitive due to the price of good evoo, is there any good reason not to try this? Have any of you tried it before? Thanks in advance for any thoughts.
  25. snowangel

    Venison Sausages

    Venison Sausages Inspired by this book -- Charcuterie, the art of smoking, salting and curing, a whole bunch of us have become obsessed with home smoked bacon, homemade and stuff sausages, dry cured items, etc. Many of us have taken parts and parcels of the recipes and come up with our own creations. You'll find out about our obsession on this topic: Charcuterie My father-in-law gave me two deer this season. Recognizing that the freezer is not a safe deposit box, and recognizing that venison and sausage are a natural, this is what I did. I wanted something quite different from what most meat markets here do with venison and sausages. 3-1/2 lb diced venison, all tendons and sinew removed 1-1/2 lb diced pork back fat, skin removed 1/4 c minced sage (packed) 2 T toasted fennel seeds 1-1/2 T granulated or minced garlic 3 T Morton's kosher salt (scant 3 T.) 1/2 c diced dried cherries 1 c red wine 10 feet hog casings 1. If your casings are dried and packed in salt, remove 10' from the package, rinse with water. Open up the opening and flush water down through the casings. Soak in water in the fridge overnight. 2. Soak the cherries in wine for a couple of hours. Drain, reserving wine. Put wine in fridge. You'll want the wine to be very, very cold! 3. Combine venison, fat, sage, fennel seeds, garlic, salt and drained cherries. 4. Follow instructions in the book to grind, bind and stuff. Make sure that everything is as cold as possible as you grind and bind! You could also just grind and bind and fry the sausage as patties. These sausages were wonderful grilled to an internal temperature of 150 (F). Keywords: Main Dish, Intermediate, Game ( RG1716 )
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