Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Charcuterie'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Society Announcements
    • Announcements
    • Member News
    • Welcome Our New Members!
  • Society Support and Documentation Center
    • Member Agreement
    • Society Policies, Guidelines & Documents
  • The Kitchen
    • Beverages & Libations
    • Cookbooks & References
    • Cooking
    • Kitchen Consumer
    • Culinary Classifieds
    • Pastry & Baking
    • Ready to Eat
    • RecipeGullet
  • Culinary Culture
    • Food Media & Arts
    • Food Traditions & Culture
    • Restaurant Life
  • Regional Cuisine
    • United States
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • India, China, Japan, & Asia/Pacific
    • Middle East & Africa
    • Latin America
  • The Fridge

Product Groups

  • Donation Levels
  • Feature Add-Ons

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


LinkedIn Profile


Location

Found 436 results

  1. I'd like to try my hand at making lomo. Does anyone here have suggestions for seasoning percentages or quantities? From what I have seen online, garlic and smoked paprika are common seasonings, but is there anything else I should be considering?
  2. I had dinner last night at a restaurant whose charcuterie plate had, among other selections, something they just called "spiced orange": it was a relatively homogeneous pork salume with little visible fat, and a really interesting herbal note to it. Is anyone aware of a precedent for this type of salami, and does anyone have a recipe for something that might fit this description?
  3. Sous vide, poaching and confit share some obvious similarities and differences. But what about the not so obvious? If I have brined some pork, will poaching in the brine be the same as sous vide-ing the brined pork? Thomas Keller uses a hybrid of confit and sous vide for lobster by adding some beurre monte to the sous vide bag. Where are the lines clear and where are they blurry?
  4. I have a surplus of roma tomatoes and want to make tomato confit. Any suggestions for what to add to the crock pot...other than the tomatoes, salt and olive oil? Maybe a sprig of rosemary?
  5. Can't remember who suggested this to me, but I tried making confit in my All-Clad Slow Cooker last night. Put in the legs and fat before bed, set the cooker to High for 8 hours, woke up to great (although perhaps a smidge too falling-off-the-bone) confit. Great application for this not-so-little appliance.
  6. Still bothered from last night. I am writing to you all for your opinion. Was at a very popular BBQ place in Brooklyn (will leave nameless for now) that sells meat by the pound. In addition to my brisket and pork belly order, I ordered a 1/2 pound of raw house-cured bacon. I have ordered this before and loved, loved, loved it. On my last order of the bacon, they sliced the meat long and thick, ala Peter Luger's (fried up, it was unreal). Now this time, the BBQ slicer/counter guy called the back of the house guy and summoned the bacon. It weighed 1lb so he cut the rectangle in half, making 2 squares, one of which was supposed to be mine. Well, who orders a 4"x5" block of raw BACON that when sliced up and cooked would be nothing more than niblets. Still wanting the goodness I acquiesced and watched as he began to wrap the block unsliced. I said "Bud, could you slice that?" He said "NO" straight out. I was like WTF, are you F-ing kidding me? The bacon sells for $10.50 a pound, which to me is a price that warrants slicing if I so choose. My favorite butcher, Fiacco's in Brooklyn, charges $5.99 a pound and we all know the Oscar Meyer stuff is $3-$5 a pound. Back to the counter guy, so after he said "NO" he said "Why, you can't slice it yourself," to which I replied "No, for the price I would like it sliced." He said, "Can't do it." I said, "Don't want it." I ate my cue, which was amazing, but was bothered by the attitude and still am. Shouldn't the paying customer have a legitimate say? Am I way off here people? What's up with these BROOKLYNY HIPSTER attitudes? FYI: I will attempt a bacon purchase again and will preface my wants and needs. Sad I didn't have it this AM when I woke up.
  7. Welcome back to our popular eGullet Cook-Off Series. Our last Cook-Off, Hash, took us into a heated discussion of the meat of the matter--should it be chopped, hashed, sliced, diced, or chunked. Click here, for our Hash discussion, and the answers to all of your questions about this beloved diner staple. The complete eG Cook-Off Index can be found here. Today we’re launching eGullet Cook-Off 59: Cured, Brined, Smoked and Salted Fish. Drying fish is a method of preservation that dates back to Ancient times, but more recently, (let’s say a mere 500 years ago or so), salt mining became a major industry in Europe and salt was a fast and economical way of preserving fish. Curing agents like nitrates were introduced in the 19th century, furthering the safety and taste of preserved fish. Where I live in the Pacific Northwest, Native Americans have been preserving fish and seafood for millennia. While we are best known for our ruby-red, oily-rich, smoked salmon, other species of fish found in the Pacific and in our streams are delicious when cured and smoked including Halibut, Sablefish and Idaho Rainbow Trout. And don’t think that you can’t smoke shellfish, alder-smoked Dungeness Crab is a wondrous Pacific Northwest delicacy that evokes memories of crab roasting over a driftwood fire on the beach. Another method of preserving fish is to bath the beauties in a brine—a combination of water, sugar, salt and spices that adds flavor and moisture to fish before it is dried or smoked. And speaking of smoked fish, you can do it in a small pan on top of the stove, in a cast iron drum, a barbecue pit, an old woodshed or a fancy digital smoker. The methods and flavors produced by smoking fish are endless. Old-fashioned ways of preserving fish, (while adequate at the time), aren't always the best method today. Today's technology provides us with the tools to create cured fish that is moist, succulent, tender and with a hint of smoke. The Modernist movement has certainly played a role in bringing this age-old craft into the 21st century, so for the avant-garde in the crowd, show us your creative wizardry for preserving fish the "modern" way. Cured, Brined, Smoked or Salted, the art of preserving fish opens us up to limitless possibilities that transcend the boundaries of cuisine and culture. So let’s sew-up the holes in our fishnets, scrub the barnacles off the rowboat and set out to sea in search of some delectable fish to cure, brine, smoke and salt.
  8. I am following the directions in Ruhlman and Polcyn's Charcuterie for the fennel cured salmon and am wondering if it is okay to cure the salmon in a ziploc bag. I regularly use ziplocs to cure bacon so I'm thinking there probably isn't any issue. They talk about using foil but that seems less convenient and I can get most of the air out of a ziploc so the cure covers the salmon more evenly. Anyone have any thoughts? Thanks
  9. I'm sure this matter has been discussed in part or whole somewhere on egullet, but after 20 minutes of various searches I sure can't find it! ]So, thanks for a pointer if you know of a previous thread. In short, I recently cut down a coppa I made and the end product ended up having too salty a taste. I've made this recipe several times with great success. This time, I'm positive the extra saltiness has to do with the fact that, due to an personal emergency, it had to spend too much time in the salt cure before it was hung (as in over a week extra). This raises a few questions for me about procedures and troubleshooting. 1. First, obviously, any suggestions for an after-the-fact how to rectify this too-salty coppa? Of course, I could chop it up and mix it into some sort of cooked dishes, but in this case, I'm specifically curious about ideas to rescue it to make it more palatable to eat on it's own. I'm open to experimentation. 2. Given that I knew that it had spent too long in the cure, what would have you advised that I had done previous to air curing? I gave it a good vinegar and water washing and about a 1 hour cold water bath before hanging. 3. Can a too-salty result be the result of too much salt in the cure? I wouldn't think so, but now I'm curious. It's been my experience that the amount of salt is less of an issue than the length of time it spends curing. I've always relied on visual cues and firmness. Thanks for any ideas.
  10. Hi, A friend of mine purchased almost 15 meters of natural hog casings for me at a local butcher yesterday. The butcher told him that they usually stored their casings in a brine under refrigeration. I am planning on using the casings in a couple of weeks time, and I have for now put them in a 5% brine in my fridge. Ruhlman and Polcyn's "Charcuterie" suggests that natural casings stored in a brine will keep roughly a month in the refrigerator, and I guess I should be able to use the casings within a month's time. However, do I need to use a stronger brine to keep them that long, or will a 5% brine do? Will an overnight soak be sufficient time to rid the casings of the salty flavour before filling? This is my first time at making the real deal at home, so any thoughts and advice are very welcome! Thanks!
  11. I had pretty much just discovered poaching chicken breasts in wine when I discovered sous vide and drove down that road for a while. Then I read about various confits. So now I'm wondering if, beyond the obvious differences of cooking medium and trading liquids, if there really is any real fundamental difference between the three. If I brine my pork ribs and then cook them sous vide, could I not just poach them in a brine? Thomas Keller has apparently hit upon poaching lobster in butter in a sous vide bath. Could this be called a confit? Since all three can be oxygen free, do the safety procedures applied to sous vide work for poaching and/or confit?
  12. I've been asked to do a French-themed cooking demo for my local community ed, and one item I'd like to make is an Alsatian onion and bacon tart. As I'm doing research I'm finding that there seems to be two types: one is quiche-like with eggs and cream in the filling, the other is more like a pizza with just a little cheese and the onion and bacon as toppings. The pizza-like recipes also seem to alternate between using puff pastry and pizza crust. Is one more traditional than the other? I'm leaning toward the quiche-like one as that seems to be the one that the most reliable sources use.
  13. In a conversation with my hair stylist, pickled sausages came up and I became intrigued. Where does one get good pickled sausages? I thought I saw some at columbus market on renfrew but it turns out those are packed in oil. suggestions?
  14. My charcuterier, Central Market, sells ends of their products. These are the tips of a ham hock, shoulder, sausage, etc. and I find them to be a great value. Prosciutto and bresaola ends are priced at $9.99/lb (considering that they sell San Daniele at $19.99 and bresaola at $29.99). Prosciutto ends are great to cook with: slice into small pieces and fry with scrambled eggs or use it to flavor a stock. I usually buy them with that intention but always end up eating too much of it straight. All other meat ends are $3.99/lb. This is usually turkey, ham, pastrami, and occasionally sausage. $3.99 is just a great deal for any kind of fully cooked meat. They sell boneless skinless chicken breast for more than that. And I actually prefer the taste of ends. On hams and turkeys, for example, you get much more delicious skin; on pastrami, more black pepper rub. I suspect that the employees snag the choicest ends as I never see anything like secola blue label prosciutto. Bresaola was the most expensive end I've ever seen.
  15. Has anyone used the LEM Meat grinders? I have been using the attachment on my Hobart mixer 20QT, but it does not quite do the job as weel as I would like. IE: clogging of some of the holes, not uniform grind etc. I'm not sure if this is due to sloppy tolerances of the die plates and blade or not. I always chill the grinder and make sure the meat is cold usually start off on a 3/4 die and go down to a 3/16. I'm curious if the commercial grinders are any better with this? I have been looking at the LEM 780 3/4 hp unit.
  16. At the risk of starting another 'cassoulete' type debate I would still like to find one or more "definitive" recipies for Toulouse sausage. The name 'Toulouse' seems to be somewhat generic for most of the pork based fresh sausage produced here in the South West of France. As I eat the sausage produced by various butchers in the towns around our area I can detect differences, sometimes subtle, somethimes not. Please let me have your thoughts. Looking in some of the other forums I note that there seem to be a lot of sausage makers out there.
  17. It involves 15 apples and a 6 hour cooking time-- looks intriguing. However, I remember reading somewhere here on eGullet that there's something seriously wrong with this recipe. Besides being in the Jean-Georges collaboration with Mark Bittman, the recipe is also now in that new Bittman vs. the Chefs book.
  18. i just had some for the first time and i can say that it's the best stuff i've had this side of the atlantic. rustic flavors, plenty of fat, and NO HEAT. i hate the heat i get from the additives in most dried salame. looking forward to trying some of the other products in moderation as they can be costly (no implication that i believe it to be overpriced) http://store.framani.com/index.html
  19. I made duck confit this past weekend and chilled the fat in an upside down mason jar in order to remove the "jelly" before storing the legs in the fat. Is there any good use for this wonderful looking jelly. I made a brown duck stock from the carcasses. Can I add the jelly to this? Should it be frozen and added to sauces or do I pitch it.
  20. A Patric

    Confit de Porc

    Hi all, Here's a question, is there any culture that has used extra virgin olive oil to confit meat rather than it's own fat/lard, etc? Perhaps this has been done somewhere in one of the cuisines of the Mediterranean? I love the flavor of evoo, probably more than most animal fats, and I'm wondering if throwing some lean pork in a big pot of seasoned olive oil (pepper, garlic, various herbs, etc) and slowly cooking it at a low temp would result in something as delicious as the normal confit de porc? Aside from it being a bit cost-prohibitive due to the price of good evoo, is there any good reason not to try this? Have any of you tried it before? Thanks in advance for any thoughts.
  21. I've been thinking about confit lately and how the duck begins surrounded by fat, but, over time, it releases it own juices so that the top of the pot is always cooking in fat, but the very bottom layer, to an extent, stews in it's own juices. Has anyone noticed the bottom layer, the layer below the water line, tasting any different from the top? Anyone notice a difference in texture?
  22. Chad

    Re-Smoking Bacon

    Here's an interesting little science experiment. I have a freezer full of pig. Really. At one of my son's baseball games this summer one of the moms leaned over and said, "Hey, Chad, you wanna buy a pig?" I said "Sure!" After all, how often do you get asked that question? As it turns out, her boys raise pigs for the 4H competition at the state fair every year. They sell the pigs and have them processed. So I bought a pig. Actually half a pig -- but it did take a blue ribbon. Anyway, I got a great pork shoulder, some gigantic, Flintstone sized pork chops, lots o' ribs, about 20 pounds of various sausages and lots and lots of bacon. Yay! Everything else has been chock full of porcine goodness, but the bacon is just plain boring. I don't think they cured it long enough or smoked it long enough. It tastes like pork, but not like bacon. Major bummer. However, on the Cooking from Charcuterie thread someone mentioned that Ruhlman & Polcyn recommend hot smoking bacon and that you can hot smoke it after it has been cold smoked. Ding! The little light goes on. Maybe I could resmoke my bacon. Worth a try, anyway. So I had a free afternoon, some applewood chips and a willingness to experiment. I figure that even if everything goes wrong, I have a rack of grilled bacon and that can't be bad. At the moment I have a pound of bacon and about half a pound of cured jowl on a roasting rack in my Weber. There's a big roasting pan of water underneath to act as a heat brake and a handful of hot coals and soaked applewood chips smoking away. I think I'm going to let it go until the bacon is actually cooked. I kept the temperature about 200 degrees for the first hour, now I've opened the vents and plan on letting it go for another 45 minutes to an hour. Anyone ever tried this? Oh, the bacon is going on what I hope to be my finest sandwich creation -- grilled pseudo-jerk chicken, applewood smoked bacon, homemade aioli, arugula and cherry tomatoes on freshly baked french rolls. Should be interesting. I'll keep you posted. Chad
  23. What do you think of North American charcuterie producers such as P.G. Molinari & Sons (San Francisco), Zerto, Citterio, Schaller & Weber (New York), Groezinger, Espanola. These are the major brands available in the finer delis Austin, TX. Some of the aforementioned brands are US-based, while some are European but sell their products in the US. For those that have had quality charcuterie in Italy, Germany or Spain how do these brands compare? Of these brands, which of their products do you like? Just off the top of my head, my favorites are the Molinari Toscano-style dry salame, Groezinger Moldavska sausage and Schaller & Weber summer sausage.
  24. Hello, this is something I experimented with. We know that the eggshell is porous and permeable, hence is can absorb smells and flavours. What I did was to dip 6 eggs in a container full of bacon drippings and pepper corns. left it in the fridge for a week and then boiled poached, fried and boiled the eggs to soft yolks (2 for each method). I was really surprised!!! the method that had the strongest flavour of bacon and hints of pepper was boiling, although frying and and poaching also gave hints of smokeyness and meatiness. Has anyone else tried this? I think the possibilities are endless!
  25. Looking for a source of lardo, which is Italian cured pork fatback, essentially. Anyone?? Thanks
×
×
  • Create New...