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Found 434 results

  1. Pasta con Broccoli Rabe, Pancetta e Pignolia Serves 6 as Main Dish. This is what I made for the eGullet pasta feast in Raleigh, NC, on 2/7/04: Ingredients 2 bunches Broccoli Rabe 1/2 head of garlic, peeled and chopped 1/4 c. olive oil, plus more as needed 1 tsp. crushed red chile 1/4 c. pine nuts 1/4 lb. pancetta Aged Asiago cheese 1. Make or procure some flat, wide-ish pasta, whatever you like. 2. Toast pine nuts in 400 degree oven or in dry skillet, taking care not to burn. 3. Crisp pancetta and set aside to cool, then crumble. 4. Blanch broccoli rabe, squeeze out excess liquid, and chop coarsely. Mince larger stems. 5. Heat olive oil over low to medium heat, add chopped garlic and saute until garlic looks cooked through but not brown. 6. Have pasta almost ready at this point, i.e. about 2 minutes more cooking time. 7. Put chopped rabe in saute pan, mix with garlic and add crushed chiles. When pasta is cooked through, drain and add to pan. Mix thoroughly. 8. Plate pasta, garnish with toasted pine nuts and crumbled pancetta, and grate asiago on top. Drizzle with EVOO, if desired. Yum! Keywords: Main Dish, Italian, Appetizer, Dinner, Intermediate, Vegetables ( RG864 )
  2. guajolote

    Halibut & Bacon

    Halibut & Bacon Serves 2 as Main Dish. 1 lb halibut fillet 1 tsp oil 3 bacon slices 1 garlic clove, sliced salt pepper Spread the oil on the bottom of a baking dish. Salt and pepper both sides of the halibut and place in dish. Place the garlic slices on top of fish. Top with bacon slices. Bake in a 425 oven until it's done (about 10 minutes). I use the convection fan so that the bacon crisps up nice. Keywords: Main Dish, Fish ( RG219 )
  3. Mayhaw Man

    Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

    Chicken and Sausage Gumbo It all started when I went to the meat market this morning and bought 3 lbs of chicken thighs. These are not Tyson's Plastic, but real chicken cut by real butchers. They are very good. I got 2 lbs of Richard's Pork Sausage and made a couple of stops to fill my vegetable needs. Sausage from Richard's is great --looks like cased ham! This stuff is just awesome. If you can get it I highly reccomend it. They make (imho) the best commercial pork products in the US. For a photo play-by-play, click Here. And, here's the definitive EG thread on Gumbo. Gumbo cooked 'round the world. 3 lb chicken thighs 2 lb pork sausage sliced, into about 1/4" coins Dusting: 2 c flour 1 T salt 1 tsp paprika 1 T cayenne powder 1 tsp cracked black pepper Peanut oil Roux: 1/3 c all purpose flour 1/3 c peanut oil Trinity 2 green peppers (one green and one red or yellow), diced 4 ribs celery, diced 2 medium onions, diced 8 cloves of garlic, minced 1 T dried basil 1 T dried oregano 2 tsp cayenne 2 tsp black fine crushed black pepper 1 T salt 6 c chicken, turkey or pork stock Partially skin the thighs (I like to leave a little fat, adds to the flavor when browning). Dust with spiced flour. Brown the dusted thighs in peanut oil. I like peanut oil as it can take a pretty good beating, adds a nice nutty taste, and you can get it very hot without burning. Turn once and hardly move while they were browning. Remove thighs and place on paper towels. Brown the sausage coins. I like to get it a little toasty. It adds both flavor and texture to the dish. Time to make the roux. You may wish to review my photo essay (linked above) to see the process as it colors. The pan has been drained, but not scraped after the browning of the sausage and chicken. It is placed over very high heat (wide open on a normal burner, Flour and oil added; this mixture is stirred constantly. Scrape up the remainder of the meat as you go. Scrape hard and get it all loose or it will all burn and you will have to start over. First you will have the light roux. Sort of the color of a skinned almond. Medium Roux. Very light brown. At this point I have been stirring about 5 minutes. It is getting very hot. WARNING-This method of making Roux was popularized during Paul Prudhomme's stay as Head Chef at Commander's Palace in New Orleans. The kitchen staff came to call this type of roux "cajun napalm". If you splash and get it on you it will stick to you and burn you badly (if you try to wipe it off while it is hot the burn will just spread) so BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL. Dark Roux. Darker brown; approaching Hershey's chocolate syrup. Now we've gotten there. At this point (maybe 10 minutes in) the oil is just starting to smoke a little bit and I am ready to stop the process. Onion, celery, bell pepper and in. This stops the browning process with the flour and the oil. Stand back as you dump-it can be a pretty lively thing. You are, after all, pouring hot water into oil. At this point I have just mixed the veg and the roux evenly. The bottom was carefully scraped, as were the sides. Then I add the garlic and I turn the heat to medium low and slowly simmer with the top on, stirring and scraping occasionally. By adding now these spices will incorporate nicely with the veg mix and basically melt into the mix. Getting the veg to the right point will take about 15 minutes. Now is the time to add the garlic. Taste at this point and adjust spicing. (some like it hot, some not. I find that with this type of gumbo I do not prefer it so spicy. The veg, sausage, and especially the chicken all stand out on their own and don't need to be bammed to heavily with spice-but as always it is a matter of personal choice) Add 6-8 cups of stock, the chicken, and the sausage. It is all stirred well and brought to a boil while uncovered. Once it hits a boil, let boil for 5 min or so on low boil, cut the heat back down to medium low and simmer for one and a half hours with the lid on. Skim fat occasionally if you wish. There will not be much grease if you did the first two steps right and bought quality sausage. About ten minutes before finish of simmer time, add 1/2 cup coarsely chopped parsely and 6 or 8 chopped green onions (tops and bottoms). Ready to plate. Yessir Buddy! That's the stuff I was looking for (I wouldn't have showed it if I had screwed it up). It is a very nice color, thick but not too, and has a nice spicy tang to it while not being overpowering. You should be able to taste the veg, chicken, and sausage nicely and the three really are working together the way that they are supposed to. A nice spicy tang while not overpowering. Fit for Royalty. A bargain at any price. Keywords: Soup, Main Dish, Intermediate ( RG1186 )
  4. dave43

    Dry Cured Salumi

    I have recently become obsessed with Charcuterie. It started with a plate at Craftsman in Minneapolis made in house by the chef. I found a little spot in Duluth, Minnesota named Northern Waters Smokehaus making salumi that recently entered their wares in Batali's Salumi contest in Seattle and won top prize. Their salumi is incredible but I would like to branch out to the big boys like Fra'Mani and Salumi. I found a little spot in my hometown in Minneapolis that sells Salumi's selection at $25 a pound. This seems expensive but I have no idea what they charge in Seattle. Is this in line? I am a liitle cash strapped but am looking for suggestions. Anyone know of good Salumi that has reasonable shipping charges and prices?
  5. silverbrow

    Beef sausages

    Beef sausages Serves 8 as Appetizer. Most recipes for homemade sausages are centred around pork. For those who don't/can't eat pork this is a good alternative. Becuase beef tends to be drier than pork this requires a relatively high fat level. I was advised by Len Poli at http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/index.htm to work on the basis of at least 30% fat, personally I found even then the sausages were a bit too dry so I upped it a bit, I go for just under 50% of the weight of bola in fat. The onion will also help with moistness. 500 g Bola/beef shoulder 240 g Beef fat 100 g Onion 20 g Salt 2-1/2 g Pepper 1-1/4 g Smoked pepper 1-1/4 g Cumin seed powder Collagen sausage skins as reqd The recipe makes 16 sausages, based on sausages of approx 10cm long. Put the bola and beef fat into the freezer to cool but not freeze. When cold combine chunks of bola and fat and mince. Try to use a proper meat mincer as this will give the desired texture. Finely dice the onion and prepare the seasoning (salt, pepper, smoker pepper and cumin seed powder. Combine onion, seasoning and mince beef and fat in a bowl. It is worth heating a pan and cooking a patty of the mixture for taste. Alter seasoning if required. A word of warning - the minced meat with onion and seasoning will be left to sit in the fridge overnight so the tastes will change slightly. Ideally the mixture should be left in a fridge overnight, at the very least it should be placed in the fridge to cool down before it is stuffed into the sausage skins. To stuff the sausages follow instructions on your mincer/stuffer. When it comes to cooking the sausages place them in a hot pan/griddle/grill and turn the heat down relatively low and cook for a long period of time. Sausages are not steaks that cook quickly. Give them time to cook, don't hurry things. Keywords: Kosher, Intermediate, Beef ( RG1379 )
  6. nolnacs

    Need some ideas for lomo

    I'd like to try my hand at making lomo. Does anyone here have suggestions for seasoning percentages or quantities? From what I have seen online, garlic and smoked paprika are common seasonings, but is there anything else I should be considering?
  7. Emily_R

    Really Good Chicken Sausage?

    Hi all -- Just wondering if anyone a) thinks it is possible to make a really good chicken (or turkey, I suppose) sausage and b) if so, if you have a recipe you'd share. I typically have shied away from poultry sausage, figuring it just couldn't be as good as luscious fatty pork... But then I figured, I'd actually wind up eating sausage more often if there was a tasty version that wasn't made with luscious fatty pork... Thanks in advance! Emily
  8. faronem

    Too long of a salt cure

    I'm sure this matter has been discussed in part or whole somewhere on egullet, but after 20 minutes of various searches I sure can't find it! ]So, thanks for a pointer if you know of a previous thread. In short, I recently cut down a coppa I made and the end product ended up having too salty a taste. I've made this recipe several times with great success. This time, I'm positive the extra saltiness has to do with the fact that, due to an personal emergency, it had to spend too much time in the salt cure before it was hung (as in over a week extra). This raises a few questions for me about procedures and troubleshooting. 1. First, obviously, any suggestions for an after-the-fact how to rectify this too-salty coppa? Of course, I could chop it up and mix it into some sort of cooked dishes, but in this case, I'm specifically curious about ideas to rescue it to make it more palatable to eat on it's own. I'm open to experimentation. 2. Given that I knew that it had spent too long in the cure, what would have you advised that I had done previous to air curing? I gave it a good vinegar and water washing and about a 1 hour cold water bath before hanging. 3. Can a too-salty result be the result of too much salt in the cure? I wouldn't think so, but now I'm curious. It's been my experience that the amount of salt is less of an issue than the length of time it spends curing. I've always relied on visual cues and firmness. Thanks for any ideas.
  9. Erich vG

    Salumi Questions...

    Hey Y'all- I've been very successful at making tesa (flat pancetta) and various fermented, moulded salamis for our restaurant, but have a couple of questions regarding whole-muscle cuts, (think culatello, lomo, speck, etc.) 1. For the coppa and lomo I have curing/hanging presently, I have used a 5% salt to raw weight ratio. If the initial cure is done in plastic bags, will this be about right? I know that prosciutti require 6%, but I figured that since they are allowed to "drip" and contain the bone, then 5% should be about right for boneless, "wet-cured" cuts. 2. The FDA requires 200 ppm nitrite in dry cured meat products. Cure #1 is 6.25% nitrite by weight, so the calculation for nitrite addition is easy, but the #2 cure I am using, (from Butcher & Packer), is 5.67% nitrite and 3.63% nitrate. Should I calculate for a nitrite value to equal 200 ppm, or should I just assume that over the hanging time the nitrate will be degraded into the appropriate level of nitrite? 3. Culatello is called the "heart of the prosciutto". Am I to assume that this is a single-muscle cut containing only the pork top round, or is it "harvested" including other muscles? 4. Which muscles/muscle groups are used to produce real Südtirol-style Speck? 5. Where the hell does one find hog bladders!!?? Thanks in advance for your input, you'll see a lot more of me around here.... Erich
  10. scott123

    Crisp Oven Bacon Quest

    I have been combing through this forum's handful of long bacon threads looking for any leads on producing really crisp oven bacon. Besides baking on a rack (which I despise washing), has anyone found a way to do this? My goal is bacon that shatters to the firm touch but is still relatively uncolored (tan/red not brown). I've gotten it a few times in the past but haven't been able to reproduce it lately. When I have been successful, it's been with low temperatures (<250 f.) for a long time (2+ hours) but these days that formula is giving me bacon that's dark brown and chewy (can't even cut it with fork!). Any ideas?
  11. helenas

    Chicken confit by-product

    I made a quick chicken confit this Sunday. Here is an idea of the recipe: curing chicken thighs for an hour or so straight in the baking dish that holds thighs snugly; baking them covered in 325F for an hour skin down; baking them covered in 325F for an hour skin up; roasting them in 450F for 20 minutes or so skin up until skin is browned and crackling. The end result is divine. Now here is my question about this thing that is left after confiting. There is a layer of fat and whatever other pan juices. It's really a pity to throw this away. But how can i use this stuff? Thank you.
  12. Stanley Feder

    Sausages

    In September 2005 I started a business called "Simply Sausage, Inc.™". I'm making fresh sausages in Landover, MD, (USDA-approved facility). I love sausages but want to eat only the best. One essential in making great sausages is the use of the highest quality ingredients. In fact, I'm somewhat fanatical about that. For example, I use only pork shoulders for my pork sausages; and in some cases I use only shoulders from certified 100% purebred Berkshire hogs. (Berkshire pork is incredibly flavorful, but I digress). I use gray sea salt from Brittany and the most flavorful Hungarian paprika available. I'm willing to offer advice to amateur sausage-makers. I'm interested in learning to what extent eGullet members think of sausages as providing good eating and the ways in which they like to eat them (what meals? how prepared?). I would appreciate hearing your views.
  13. Hello I've got a glut of lamb to use up and im after a good recipe for a lamb sausage. If possible, I want to avoid having to add pork fat. Open to any ideas just as long as its good! Many thanks
  14. scott123

    Homemade Andouille

    It's official. I do NOT like kielbasa as a sub for andouille in gumbo. NOT at all. The whole coriander hot dog note drives me bonkers. At around $2.50 a lb. it's a shame I can't work with it. I can get okay andouille, but it costs me around $8/lb. It's my favorite part of gumbo but that's a little too rich for my blood. As I can get pork butt for practically nothing, I've been considering making my own. Anyone make their own andouille? What do you think about this andouille recipe? Any tips/tricks you'd recommend?
  15. James Satriano

    confit jelly

    I made duck confit this past weekend and chilled the fat in an upside down mason jar in order to remove the "jelly" before storing the legs in the fat. Is there any good use for this wonderful looking jelly. I made a brown duck stock from the carcasses. Can I add the jelly to this? Should it be frozen and added to sauces or do I pitch it.
  16. bilrus

    Biscuits and Sausage Gravy Help

    I have been craving biscuits with sausage gravy. I can figure out the biscuits, but can't find anything about how to make the gravy. Anyone have any ideas or places they can point me? I thank you in advance. My arteries - not so much.
  17. ingridsf

    Bacon ice cream on ICA

    Cora, who lost big on taste to challenger Neal Fraser in the taste category, created an…unusual dish during Pork Battle last night. The dish also included sautéed blueberries, a sweet little pork cutlet, and a streusel topping composed of flour and lard, among other things. Only ICA Judge Harry Smith loved the bacon ice cream; even Steingarten demurred, and visibly calmed down when Burke soothed him with crispy pork skin, a more conventional fat-delivery system. The third Judge, 80s celebrity author turned wine writer Jay McInerney, said the bacon ice cream freaked him out. Well, scaffolding masquerading as shoulder pads freaked me out, Jay. We all have our fears. Am I the only one who saw it? Because I would have thought the words, “bacon + ice cream,” would spark lardophiles and dreamyfrozendessertophiles into a spirited debate. edited because I messed up on the challenger's name.
  18. rarerollingobject

    Lardo in Sydney?

    Looking for a source of lardo, which is Italian cured pork fatback, essentially. Anyone?? Thanks
  19. whifflechef

    berkshire pork sausage

    So I am partnering with a local pork producer who specializes in amazing berkshire pork but also raises lamb and some grassfed beef (DWFarms). I have offered to make them some sausage recipes to sell at the farmers market. The sausage they have made so far has some texture issues. I assumed that being a leaner pork and a very small farm they were using mostly scrap and did not follow the proper ratios for sausage. My first batch with a proper lean meat to fat ratio as well as a batch with an increased fat ratio also had this texture issue, dry and crumbly. Obviously it is a fat emulsification issue. I tried a mousseline route with heavy cream but no panada. Besides the next step of adding a panada does anyone have any suggestions? Adding any pork besides theirs is not a possibility.
  20. I apologize for any duplication. I'm looking for a quality recipe for a good traditional garlic kielbasa. I've made before but always cheated with spice mix from butcher supply and moose meat would like to make my own. Don't have access to anything besdies your hillshire here. Have a good workingt knowledge of sausage making but am looking for someones grandmothers recipe to go with my family pierrogi recipe. Food memories.....yummm. any help greatly appreciated but basically looking for a what spices, to what meats all pork, or pork and beef, ratio . Is a light smoke involved . ?The recipes I found on the net involved liquid smoke which i'm not fond of. If smoking is appropriate I will do cold smoke process ... happy holidays - ps this is for xmas day ty.
  21. From a recent Texas Food Media DIGEST entry by Raynickben: From the article Kuby's sausages have been a long time favorite of mine. What are your favorite sausage makers in the DFW area?
  22. silverfux

    Help with our charcuterie

    Hi! i am working at a restaurant in south africa where we are curing our own meet. We are having a problem with tiny little white bugs (they look almost like lice) that are inside our leg hams. Does anyone know what they are and how we should get rid of them. the picture attached is the damage they have done on one of our legs.
  23. Rory Hart

    Curing Salmon in a Ziploc bag

    I am following the directions in Ruhlman and Polcyn's Charcuterie for the fennel cured salmon and am wondering if it is okay to cure the salmon in a ziploc bag. I regularly use ziplocs to cure bacon so I'm thinking there probably isn't any issue. They talk about using foil but that seems less convenient and I can get most of the air out of a ziploc so the cure covers the salmon more evenly. Anyone have any thoughts? Thanks
  24. Hello, this is something I experimented with. We know that the eggshell is porous and permeable, hence is can absorb smells and flavours. What I did was to dip 6 eggs in a container full of bacon drippings and pepper corns. left it in the fridge for a week and then boiled poached, fried and boiled the eggs to soft yolks (2 for each method). I was really surprised!!! the method that had the strongest flavour of bacon and hints of pepper was boiling, although frying and and poaching also gave hints of smokeyness and meatiness. Has anyone else tried this? I think the possibilities are endless!
  25. In a conversation with my hair stylist, pickled sausages came up and I became intrigued. Where does one get good pickled sausages? I thought I saw some at columbus market on renfrew but it turns out those are packed in oil. suggestions?
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