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Lam

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About Lam

  1. Update: Thank you everyone for your suggestions. I used 3/4 cup ap flour and 1/3 cup almond flour and ommited one yolk. The brownies came out with a really nice shiny and crackly top because there was less moisture. However, the brownies were really dry and dense and not chewy at all. I will have to fix the ratio of ap to almond flour again. (if anyone's wondering the white part inside the brownie is mochi, a chewy glutinous japanese rice cake)
  2. Update: I left them in the fridge for a couple hours which made them much chewier. They were super moist even after they came out of the oven and cooled down. Think this recipe works better "matured".
  3. Thanks, I'll have to try it with only ap flour next time and reducing the eggs.
  4. So I've been looking for the ultimate matcha brownies (technically blondies but it just doesn't have the same ring to it). I've made chewy and fudgy regular brownies, but I find white chocolate based blondies to be much trickier. I have made a few matcha brownie recipes in the past, but they all came out sad and cakey. So I have taken it upon myself to come up with my own recipe. My matcha brownies came out very moist and "fudgy" but not chewy. I'm thinking next time I should try using vegetable oil instead of butter and only dark brown sugar.
  5. I have tried making macarons again after this, but with a bit of tapioca starch like a certain recipe suggested. The tapioca starch didn't change anything. I got my usual result- hollow macarons. Has probably been my 14/15th attempt at macarons, and my hopes of getting full and perfect macarons are looking quite bleak. Has anyone gotten hollow macs and have been able to solve the issue?
  6. Yes, if you can, a link to the video would be helpful!
  7. Thank you! I have seen a few people do this, I myself, have only done it for meringue cookies. Guess I will have to try this with macarons next time.
  8. Yes, I always make sure to press the batter against the sides of the bowl to delfate the meringue. Depends on the recipe I use, but usually I find they dry within 15-30 minutes. I use a tiny bit of gel coloring or sometimes powdered. I haven't tried Americolor yet, do you know where I can find it besides online? Thanks for the reply!
  9. They're actually not underbaked. I have had a batch of wrinkled macarons before and they all have a soft texture when warm, but after they cool they become extremely chewy.
  10. Yes, I always make sure to let them sit out before I bake them
  11. I have been experiementing with macarons these last few months, and I have yet to make perfect macarons. Most of the macarons I have made are hollow on the inside. They're so hollow, if I nudge them a bit, the top crust just comes right off. They still taste decent but not what a successful macaron should be like. I don't think I am overbeating my meringue at all. They are always firm and stiff. I have tried whipping a little less than I usually do but still get hollows. I did some research and saw a few people recommend adding a bit of cornstarch to the dry mix. Yep. Cornstarch. This really perplexed me because I always see people saying not to use powdered sugar that contains cornstarch, so how could adding cornstarch prevent hollow macs? I also saw one person use tapioca starch to prevent hollows as well. This time around, I whipped the meringue at a much longer time, but no higher than speed 7 (kitchenaid), which gave me a super stable meringue. I also added cornstarch. I piped the batter out, and they looked super perfect the first few minutes in the oven. Sadly, they came out very wrinkled. The first batch was super wrinkled, but the second batch was less wrinkled, or bumpy even. Not sure if this is because of the silpat for the first batch and the parchment pper for the second hmm. Does anyone know what I did wrong to get these wrinkled macs and how to troubleshoot? Also some help on hollow macs would be appreciated! Thanks
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