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Dave W

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Posts posted by Dave W

  1. 2 hours ago, rustwood said:

     

     

    With ribs, brisket and pork butts, the general rule of thumb is that they aren't going to pick up additional smoke after about 2 hours.  

     

     

    Excuse me for nitpicking but this isn't accurate. Smoke particles will continue to adsorb to the surface of the meat so long as both are present. 

     

    The chemical reaction that creates a pink smoke ring ceases above ~140F, so smoke ring formation stops after a couple hours but smoke flavor will continue to build. 

  2. Braising in your smoker works great especially with disposable pans because of the smoke soiling the vessel as mentioned above. Mature charcoal fires generate negligible airborne ash and you can keep the smoke under control too. 

     

    The food including liquid will pick up smoke flavor, so take it easy on the smoke wood. Or, if you cover the pan it's equivalent to using an oven so smoke the meat naked for a while first for maillard. 

  3. 16 hours ago, kayb said:

    I find it interesting that Brennan's Restaurant, a New Orleans standard for 70 years, uses sous vide on some dishes. Notably, they sous vide the egg yolks for their egg yolk carpaccio, which is beyond wonderful.

     

    58b2011159b6a_eggyolkcarpaccio.thumb.jpg.0f24546505744bae03afc602f8b4c88d.jpg

     

     

     

    I used to serve here and this dish was not on the menu in 2004. Seemingly any dish developed after 1975 wasn't, either. Good to see they're moving on. 

     

    The 30 hour 54.8c chuck steaks came out poorly, not quite super tender but neither were they juicy. 

     

    Drying a sous vide steak uncovered on a rack in the fridge for a day can help get you an out of this world crust though. 

    IMG_4483.JPG

    • Like 1
  4. Thanks for the safety feedback everyone. I do calibrate my bath with a thermapen, and did for this cook. Everything was crash cooled in ice baths too prior to storage. Maybe the home fridge opening and closing is a valid point for storage temperature stability and I will use my best efforts to eat this meat within a week or two!

    • Like 1
  5. 7 hours ago, rotuts said:

    make sure your refirg is cold.  

     

    for 3 weeks id consider a temp check.

     

    the vey back of the lowest shelf in my refrig is almost 32 F

     

     

    Some beef in this location in my fridge registered 2/2.5C in core/surface so max 36.5F. 

     

    I think Baldwin wrote that under 3C, outgrowth of C botulinum spores was over a month but he has wisely monetized that information and it's not readily available online. 

  6. This weekend, various seasoning chicken thighs 65cx4 hours, and beef chuck steaks seam trimmed out of chuck roasts, 54.8cx30hours. They will all wait paitiently in the back of the fridge for me to eat them in the next three weeks. 

     

    A pound of the chicken has made it into some buffalo chicken salad with franks hot sauce, mayo, celery, garlic powder  and blue cheese crumbles 

    • Like 1
  7. So many different kinds to choose from

     

    If you like KC style this one is good

     

    http://allrecipes.com/recipe/44491/big-als-kc-bar-b-q-sauce/

     

    if you like a more tangy one then I'm a fan of this

     

    http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/member/views/fat-johnnys-bastardized-piedmont-sauce-52236021

     

    There are endless variations and regional styles so it's beyond my ability to nominate the "best." Sauces that work with pork are often good with chicken and vice versa, beef likes some different flavors

     

     

     

  8. Hello bakers,

     

    Beautiful work in here as always. I recently made the challah from Peter Reinhardts book the Bread Baker's Apprentice. This is a supremely easy bread and the results are awesome. I have another, double batch in the mixer at the moment. 

     

    UGgEggC.jpg

     

    Keep on baking!

     

     

    • Like 13
  9. OMG! My brother would call those steaks "Fred Flintstone Steaks" because they were so huge. I would have loved to have been there for a big bite of that steak. However, it was majorly raw in the middle. I assume that because they were high-end steaks that even raw they would have been tender.

    Those steaks looked Pittsburg rare to me. Or colder.

    In Heat Buford discusses the preparation of Dario the butcher's biztecca ala fioretina and the raw center is by design. If I remember right he said the proper way to eat it is to press the bite against the roof of your mouth with your tongue.

    So it sounds pretty tender to me.

  10.  

     

    Please note the beads of moisture all over the sides of the cake.  Can you imagine any professional baker or food stylist putting a cake that looks like that out there?  I know how it happened.  I’ve had it happen to me when I’ve frozen an iced cake and thawed it.  It is extremely frustrating, but I wouldn’t have taken it to my clients like that!  

     

     

    Seems appropriate for an "icebox cake" to me. I don't think Sandra Lee has any designs on being considered a professional baker or food stylist. In fact she's perfectly shameless about the provenance of some of the baked goods she creates.

  11. ElainaA I can't imagine that the author of the vegetarian epicure could take huge offense at serving these gorgeous mushrooms with steak considering that the Worcestershire sauce contains anchovy...

    No photos tonight but I grilled some boneless skinless chicken breasts with a day of marinading in vindaloo spices-yogurt-lemon-garlic-ginger.

    The chicken was fine but took a MAJOR backseat to a creamed patak I whipped up with cumin seed turmeric and cayenne, onion garlic ginger and green Chilis then frozen chopped spinach and kale blend. Generous sour cream, garam masala, and lemon juice to finish.

    It's amazing when veggie sides greatly outshine the protein, on the plate tonight the chicken was a side to the greens for sure.

    • Like 3
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