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Anonymous Modernist 15013

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  1. I made some chicken and dumps this weekend and decided to confit a few chicken legs in duck fat for the chicken portion of the dish. I looked through MCAH and read a bit on the MC blog/recipes. I came across much difference in various spots and was wondering why? (these references are from memory - sorry do not have the book in front of me) In MCAH at home it notes on the turkey confit recipe to cook at 140 for 24 hours (which says you can sub duck or chicken) two pages before that it says to cook chicken legs at 146 for 3 hours (not confit) on that same page it notes that duck confit should cook at a different temp than either of the above reference (I do not recall the temp) on the blog/recipes it notes to cook the turkey leg at 144 for 8 hours in MC i think it notes to cook duck leg at 180 for 8 hours There is also some differences in fat amounts. Turkey Confit in MCAH has 150g, online recipe is 600g, later in MCAH it notes 12g per duck leg (I assume because duck has much more fat that chicken?). Why is there so much variation not only on temp but time as well? I ended up cooking at 140 for about 18 hours and then at 160 for another 6 or so (I wanted to make sure it was cooked - even though I know at 140 for 24 it should be fine). in the end it was insanely delicious and I want to eat it every night for dinner. Wat does everyone cook their confit at?
  2. I use this little bad boy.. does 29gph. http://www.lightobject.com/High-temperature100-39C-DC-12V-185LMin-29GPH-mini-Water-Pump-FDA-Food-grade-P711.aspx Seems to work well. At $14 it is very reasonable. You still need a 12v DC power supply and something to mount the pump to. I incorporated it into the box I used with the heating elements. Some brass fittings and a 1/8" brass tube. It's currently zip tied to the tube as I couldn't come up with a better way to attach. It certainly works though. Since you made your you could add a DC jack off the back and plug/unplug when you need to.
  3. Any on the MC Team that can shed some light on this one for me?
  4. I had read in the blog that pastrami was served with Taki's sweet onion sauerkraut? I assumed this was made and not bought? Perhpas I am overthinking it?
  5. Yes, I guess that really goes for anything. We chose wet cure because that it was we knew (and it was good last year). We chose sous vide, because I just made the circulator and wanted to do it. That being said, I don't think I would cook it any other way moving forward. It was very good and I am upset that this is my last sandwich today (boo). I'd like to get a hold of the technique the MC folks use for the sweet onion sauerkraut. Is it just pickled sweet onions or are they fermented? If they are fermented do you add some brine from sauerkraut to introduce the lactic acid required to ferment or do you add cabbage to introduce lactic acid? How much of either should I add? Can anyone help me on that?
  6. We just did one for dinner last night. We corned a brisket for 5 days using Ruhlman's pickling spice and some potassium nitrate. Although not MC, it is very tasty. We rinsed it off and vac packed it. We had it in the bath at 143f for ~60hours (I ran out of time to keep it in there for 72hours). MC noted for bricket to do 140 for 72h (tender but yielding) or 145 for 72h (tender and flaky). He did the middle and it was quite delicious. Great flavour and texture. I think i'd try 145 next time maybe though. On a side note, since the bath was at 143 so we plopped in some MC@H meatloaf sandwiches for 30 minutes at lunch time.. also stellar and super easy.
  7. Good thing beacuse I have been adding the oil and garlic to just about anything I can. Pizza dough, mayo, dips, sauces pretty much anything that has oil or wants more flavour. Stuff is great.
  8. I have the 8 quart model. It fits about 3 of the smaller jars that the recipe calls for. Not sure how the 6 would work as the height of the 8 with the trivet and basket wouldn't allow anything taller in it. I would try to get the smaller jars (8oz) and 1/2 the recipe, or leave the recipe and split between 2 jars. I don't see why that wouldn't work. It's very easy to go through this stuff quickly as it is delicious.
  9. I made 2 jars on the weekend in my Fagor Duo. Turned out great, used the trivet (which is about 1.5" high) and filled the water to the top side of the trivet. Put it on 1 bar for 2 hours and they came out great - except one problem. After putting them in the fridge 1 jar stayed liquid with the oil remaining semi-translucent, however the other jar the oil clouded and solidified. Has this happened to anyone yet? I was going to reheat the oil in a water bath (i don't want to scoop it out) to see if it clarifies and doesn't solidify in the fridge. You think it's still okay to eat? As a side note, the garlic and oil is isanely delicious. Had some fresh baked bread with that oil and the pressure cooked pizza sauce.. oh my.. bliss.
  10. It does answer my question Sam, thanks. I think I may have let the polenta sit a bit too long and it firm up WAY too much.. not creamy at all. Will be trying it again though.
  11. I was wondering why the difference in cook times between MCAH and MC for the pressure cooked polenta. The quantities of ingredients are the same but the MC version is vacuum sealed and PC'ed for 8 minutes while the MCAH version is in a mason jar and PC'ed for 12 minutes? Should the cook time not be much closer together? 50% more time for something with the same amount of product? I ask because I made it on the weekend and to say it turned out subpar would be a very large understatement. I will be trying again but want to know if I should be cooking it for 8 minutes or 12 in mason jars? Any help is greatly appreciated. Edit: Started thread in wrong location, sorry.
  12. I am about to make the beef stock this week and I also wonder about the yield? Is there an error in the yield or in one of the ingredient quantities? edit: And why does the photo on page 86 (modernist cuisine at home) below the beef stock formula show a charred onion but the formula calls for onion thinkly sliced? Is this a different approach - more of what I have seen in other recipes?
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