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JoNorvelleWalker

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Posts posted by JoNorvelleWalker

  1. Last night I was sleep deprived, over tired, and braindead from work.  I did not trust myself around hot oil.  I did my Alexia fries in the APO instead.  Very disappointed.  Like eating salty cardboard.

     

    • Haha 1
  2. 7 hours ago, MetsFan5 said:

    Right now that PAG is tempting. I can’t see an advantage to an electric grill. Has one one had one? 

     

    The PAG is an electric grill.  When I got the Philips I stopped using my old electric grill.  Which could not be immersed in water and was impossible to clean.  Hence it also created lots of smoke.

     

    The main reason to get a PGA rather than a more traditional electric grill is that food tastes better grilled on it.  As @Kerry Beal explained when she enabled me.

     

    • Like 1
    • Thanks 1
  3. If indoor steaks or chops are your thing, the Philips infrared grill is indeed the device to have.  Don't thank me, blame Kerry.  Just be sure not to put the Philips on a circuit with any other kitchen toy.  Though steak tartare by candlelight has a certain charm.

     

    • Like 1
    • Haha 2
  4. 48 minutes ago, palo said:

    Instant Vortex Plus with ClearCook:

     

    https://www.amazon.ca/Instant-ClearCookTM-OdorEraseTM-Dehydrate-Stainless/dp/B096N28SZP/ref=sr_1_14?crid=1FOPYVE5UKVXJ&keywords=instant+vortex+air+fryer&qid=1654648197&s=kitchen&sprefix=Instant+Vortex%2Ckitchen%2C108&sr=1-14

     

    Not sure how functional it is, but I have the one without the window and is great as an Air Fryer

     

    ATK rated the Instant Vortex Plus 6 Quart as its best with the ClearCook model as its upgrade pick

     

    Here's their take on Air Fryer Ovens:

     

    Quote:

     

    What To Avoid

    • Air-Fryer Ovens: All the oven-style models we tested were difficult to use and produced lackluster results. They had bigger footprints but couldn't actually fit much more food inside. Having multiple levels of racks didn't work well in any of the air fryers we tested. The upper rack blocked heat from reaching the lower rack, resulting in unevenly cooked food. Despite our efforts to manage this uneven heating by switching and rotating the racks, the food never finished cooking at the same time. And because the cooking racks and baskets didn't have handles, we had to use oven mitts. Crumbs and drips fell through the perforations in the racks and onto the floor of the ovens or, more frustratingly, onto our kitchen floor. They were also a pain to clean; crumbs stuck to their bases and hinges and were impossible to remove.

     

    p

     

    Would this include the APO?

     

  5. 34 minutes ago, Annie_H said:

    My temp Spots came over the weekend. Nice design. I ordered 5. Must have been a bundle deal. I already have good fridge/freezer probes and two have alarms. 

    This design is nice sitting in a few fridge areas, then move around for zone checks. 

     

    IMG_3343.jpeg

     

    I got six.

     

    In related news Thermoworks repaired my well out of warranty ThermaQ at no charge.

     

    • Like 5
  6. 8 minutes ago, andiesenji said:

    I didn't include any of the roasters or the ovenware, just the stove top stuff.  Nor my collection of tagines.  Remember that ongoing thread some 15 years back when Paula Wolfert would occasionally post about the different types of tagines?

     

    Indeed.  Thankfully I only have two.  I wish Paula were well enough to still participate.

     

    • Like 4
  7. Screw Kenji and Voltaggio.  I could not decide between my Scanpan non-stick saute pan and my Berndes non-stick wok.  I grabbed my trusty Williams Sonoma stir fry pan and stir fried sliced mushrooms.  Transferred the mushrooms to a bowl.  Added fresh oil and rosemary to the pan and browned the chicken all over.  Keeping it moving with the wok shovel.  Added vinegar then wine and garlic, and cooked down till the liquid evaporated.  Removed the chicken from the pan, then added water to deglaze and make a sauce.  Returned chicken and mushrooms to the pan for just a moment before serving.

     

    I have been making chicken cacciatore almost fifty years, or maybe more.  One of my best ever.  Accompanied by last night's baguette and Boursin.

     

    • Like 2
  8. 38 minutes ago, andiesenji said:

    I keep losing count.

    53 pots and pans hanging in the pantry and kitchen.  in the store room, 5 stockpots 8, 12, 16, 20, quarts (two 8 quart)  seven copper tin-lined sauce pans, 2 unlined copper sugar pans, 5 Pyrex double boilers, 1 qt, 1.5 qt, 2 qt.  8 Pyrex Flameware saucepans, various sizes.  Two sets of Corningware stove top cookware with the blue flowers.  One complete set of Corning Visions stovetop cookware, brought out for when I make fruit syrups and candied or glacé fruits.  

    Among the ones in the photo are 5 crepe pans 8", 9", 10" 11" 12"  Because I find it easier to make them  the correct size in a pan instead of trying to restrict the spread of the batter myself.

    There are three omelet pans sized from 9" to 11" - just because.  

    Some of the skillets are "throwaway" ones that I cook stuff that is problematic and if they get damaged, burnt, I can just toss them.

    I think these add up to 93.

     

    Well, if you count Corningware and double boilers I can add twelve more.  Plus I found another pot in the bedroom while searching for the Corningware.  I threw away my Visions -- horrible stuff.  Also I did not include my aunt's ancient bean pot.  I have never cooked in it because I am not sure it is lead free.

     

    You and I both use our bedrooms as pantry.  It's just that I have to sleep in mine.

     

    • Like 2
  9. 31 minutes ago, Anna N said:

    Well if you follow the Kenji link to Voltaggio:

    “Have ready a large bowl of ice water. Remove the thighs from the circulating water and place the bag into the ice water for 20 minutes. If serving the chicken that day, place the bag on a baking sheet and refrigerate until ready to sear the thighs. If serving the chicken the next day, place the bag, with the thighs skin side down, on a baking sheet. Place another baking sheet on top and weight it down with a heavy fry pan. Refrigerate overnight.”

     

    Failing that I think you are stuck using a spatula to hold the thigh flat against the pan. 

     

    I assure you, neither my Lamson Heavy Duty Stiff Turner nor my 2kg Paderno meat pounder would hold this unbagged thigh flat against anything.

  10. 15 minutes ago, Ann_T said:

    Amazing colour on your crust.  

     

    This time the loaves really were red.  It was as if I had added malt to the flour.  Something must be off.  I did cut the yeast in half from usual.  But the bread tastes fine.

     

  11. 9 hours ago, Anna N said:

    I am always interested in technique so I found myself wading through this slurry of verbal diarrhoea in search of something that Kenji does that differs from what I do. After an expenditure of unrecoverable and precious time the only difference I found was that he flattens the sous-vided skin-side-down thigh on the cutting board whereas I do that in the pan. Am I missing some vital step?

     

    I am the one who may be missing some vital step:  since the chicken is cooked, how do you get it to lie flat?  Short of a tortilla press.

     

  12. 13 minutes ago, andiesenji said:

    Beginning in 2014 I began selling most of my antique cast iron cookware.  Then sold some of my copper cookware.  Several pieces of Le Creuset, kept the Descoware, gave a couple of pieces to my daughter and a large Danish paella pan.

    I still have large Calphalon stock pots and some steel stock pots, though I sold the largest as I no longer do that much cooking.

    Some of my skillets are used for just one or two tasks because they do the job perfectly and I don't have to make "adjustments" when I use them.

    I have a store room used to be a bedroom and then the dog room when I was breeding Basenjis, now it holds three large steel shelving units that hold rarely used pots, appliances and some of my collectible mixers, toasters, waffle irons.

    I just took this photo of my pantry ceiling.

    pantry ceiling.jpg

     

    Yes, but did you count them?

     

    • Like 1
    • Haha 5
  13. 1 hour ago, Anna N said:

    This still appears to be available on amazon.ca. 

     

    Different incarnations of Pearl River can be found here too.  I saw some in plastic bottles available from third party sellers.  When I can I always try to buy food products (or anything for that matter) that are sold directly by amazon.  I've had bad experience with counterfeit goods and strange products from third party sellers.  Most recently olives with no label.

     

    • Like 2
  14. 8 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

    How about rubbing a little baking soda on the skin before browning?  

     

    For Maillard?  I would think the pan would get hot enough so that pH is not an issue.  And I worry that baking soda will make food taste funny.  I suspect the reason I have trouble browning sous vide chicken skin is the water that the skin contains.

     

  15. For what passes as my attempt at Chinese stir fry I have been most pleased with Pearl River light.  The Pearl River recommendation was probably from another soy sauce thread I cannot now find.

     

    Sadly I killed my last bottle of Pearl River light the other night.  (I still have some Pearl River dark in the refrigerator.)  Amazon just cancelled my replacement order of Pearl River light due to lack of availability.  I shan't starve.  I have several bottles of soy sauce in the bedroom, but nothing that is a good replacement for Pearl River light.  Are there any soy sauce products similar to Pearl River light that might be a step up in quality?  Ones that are available to me sitting in front of a computer in America?

     

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