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freddychef

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  1. Well hey ya made it through and as the usual saying at least 3 years to land on your feet....good going......I hope to drop by next summer as I am looking to relocate to NS from NL.....freddychef....The diner sounds like fun......
  2. Again it depends on the cut, the hunt, the time in the freezer BUT I always tend to prepare it in a few select ways...depending on the size attempt a few small recipes...pound a few pieces and marinate and grill; make a nice braise with red wine,double smoked bacon, homemade parsley spaetzle and carmelized shallots or onions, or bottle and enjoy later on as the process (if done right) can add an enormous treasure that is great taken straight from the bottle!!!
  3. Whadayaat? Glad to hear that you have made a go of it in NB...I had hoped to be over that way working this past season and had wanted to drop by, but life gets in the way.....yes there is a lot more in the way of local products in the region and often think that the industry itself does not help in the promotion. I was wondering if the emails I sent were of any help in sussing out local products and also, what did you eventually find? I did not see a link to the restaurant above is there one---would love to peruse...again good luck and maybe I 'll be able to get there...freddychef
  4. Island sunset beach resort at Margaree Harbour, lobster pound at the wharfa s well, well really Belle Cote I guess, fish shack in Cheticamp, a fresh mussel pound at a house just before the turn to Dingwall...right on the highway....fresh farmed trout at Margaree Forks--just ask at the Irving tell Mr. Lush fred says hi--freddychef
  5. Of course it all depends on what part of Nova Scotia you are heading to? If Halifax well there are a couple threads outlining the restaurants there....off the beaten track....if you want to do the Cabot Trail (really a must) try something rustic like Aspey bay oysters up around Dingwall, Cape Breton, also in Pleasant bay you'll find snow crab, Cheticamp fresh local mussels....Margaree try the Normaway inn for local CB fish--but all ahead and ask since they often have a set menu......local lobster is everywhere....same witha lot of fish......freddychef
  6. A few more sources..Aspy Bay, Dingwall, NS,Bay Enterprises, Malagash, NS, Shandaph in Merogomish, NS all for oysters. There use to be a guy in Englishtown as well but I cannot remember the name. Of course there are Malpaques in PEI but I no longer have a source Halifax Farmer's market website has a lot of sources for local vegetables, meats, diary and specialty products(halifaxfarmersmarket.com). In PEI, same thing, the Farmer's market on saturday offers a wide range of food stuffs from the island. I remember reaaly great rye bread, local sausage from out Montague way.http://www.gov.pe.ca/af/agweb/produce/markets.php3......only decent link..... Georgetown bakery in St. John's artisanal breads, Julien's in Halifax. St John's NB farmer's market Tatamagouche farmer's market (www.farmersmarkett.com) La Boulangerie Aucoin in Cheticamp for Artisan breads Really try to get there early while going hiking for the chocolate croissants.. Auntie Crae's in St. John' for (www.auntiecraes.com) some local jams and berries. Bidgood's store in The Gould's in NL for ALL Nl products including moose, seal, rabbit, caribou.(www.bidgoods.ca). The Dutchman's Farm for artisanal cheese in Economy NS. The Devil's breath is an interesting waxed blue cheese. Patrick Mathey in Iles de Madeleine for sausage, proscuitto (also at The Jean Talon Market in Montreal). Tatamagouche creamery for butter. The Pork Shoppe in Denmark, NS Various vineyards and wineries, Jost Grande pre in NS, Rodriquez in NL.... Holdanca Farms for free range meats, chicken, beef and lamd...maybe goat as well.They are in wallace bay as well as in the area Linden meats for local beef. Foxhill cheesehouse (www.foxhillcheesehouse.com)..really like their old cheddar. In Maitland Ns there is a big supplier of herbs...Riverview. I have used them in many places and last year we use alot of herbs and micro greens from them for various occassions.....trying to think of smoke houses and I knew a couple down around sT John, NB, Wolfhead smokers.com around Letang... Kim Dormaar (sp?) in PEI, Willy Krauch is still down around tangier, NS....so a lot of places to have a look at...freddychef ps--the place you mentioned is that a restaurant as well. I heard of this place but cannot remember the name that was outside moncton or St. John that specialized in Acadian style food??? There are a lot of local honey and dairy producer's as well.....freddychef
  7. Good Idea....I thought of how to put this together but I'll just jump in. In each province half the fun I have had when working has been sourcing out local resources for professional and personal use. Each province has an abundance of sources from beef to wine to cheese. So here are some ideas that people may wish to look into. I have not included all the links or url's but just a list of things I've encountered...... Here is Newfoundland climate, economy geography and culture have often dictated a limited base for supplies. Recently though there has been an upsurge in local products that are found in local supermarkets, farmers stalls and at the source, on the farm. In St. John 's a first stop to locate suppliers of local goods could be a small store called Food For Thought. This store run by Nancy Maher has turned into a hub of sorts where one can locate other food stuffs. Nancy can help you source out local vegetables (organic and not depending on the definition), local beef and lamb suppliers, mycology hunters, and the like. For local beef you could try Windy Meadows farm in The Goulds for Angus beef that is hormone, free (windymeadows@nl.rogers.com) Rushmere farms for lamb, chicken and duck. For local vegetables there are a few stalls set up in Churchill Square selling local veg as well as salt, fresh cod, seal and lamb. Across the province you'll find local honey suppliers, vegetable markets and the like. In Nova Scotia, Sweet Williams for sausages in Stewiacke, The Austrian Smokehouse in North River for double smoked bacon, various cheese suppliers including Ran-Cher Acres for goat cheeses(www.rancheracres.com) Green Dragon for mushrooms and fallow deer. In the Tatanmagouche area there is a local food guide put. Try getting in touch with Tatamagouche Local Foods Coalition. For dry supplies in New Brunswick there is Dolphin Village in Dieppe---they offer a wide range of dry goods , cheeses, and other supplies that you may not locate.......I have to stop here to watch hockey but there are a lot of other sources that I will have to think of...freddychef
  8. Yes, we still do. ← There are many stories of the origin of the term 'monkey dish', but none of them are verified. Here are a few of them. It is a bowl the size a monkey would use. It is a bowl that was originally made from a monkey's skull. It is a shallow bowl the size of a monkey's hand. Royalty once had small portions of their food fed to monkeys to be sure it wasn't poisoned. Bell hops wore caps similar to those worn by organ grinder monkeys. The bell hops became known as 'monkeys,' and the smaller dishes were used by these 'monkeys' to serve in-room guests. The list goes on.
  9. I thought I would add a few from my extensive list to stir the sauce so to speak.... 1) When in trouble--in theweeds/ on the rail/ I need it yesterday/ in the shits/ keep your stick on the ice/printer diarrhea/under like a rock.... 2) A line cook or flashy one-- line doggy/ one armed bandit/ kitchen cowboy/hack.. 3) In the `stewarding area`--dishpit/ great wall of china/ dishpig/pot walloper/ the great wall of china/dish doggy.... 4) Servers--waitriod/ waitron/ the black and the whites/ front of house/
  10. Yes mark has corresponded with me a couple of years ago when I designed a Newfoundland and Labrador Culinary calender. I have a copy of the book but it does deal with the actual slang, phrases and words that you hear in so many kitchens....fred
  11. Hello again...not sure if I have posted this here but it is always an amusing thread. I am researching culinary language that chefs, cooks, front of house staff etc use in the everyday running of their culinary world. Every thing from `run it through the garden`, waitroid, nuke it, zizzed, grazers,,,,the list grows. Over the past couple of years I have received numerous emails and posts outlining phrases, slang, vernacular that relates to the culinary world in many ways. From names for foods, local names for equipment, service, customers, etc....I am in the process of compling the list and thought well one more kick at the can... What is of interest is that the list, the culture of the culinary world is ever changing. Every time I take a new position (this summer on a movie set I heard `The Trough` for the banquet line set up for instance) there are new words and phrases...so any takers? freddychef
  12. Funny how we all interpret `local support`.....as a far east coaster I have admired the ways in which Quebec chefs, culinary professionals, those that dig in the dirt and everyone else DO SUPPORT local food initiatives. Of course I say this being from outside that province (remembering that this forum is soley not quebec based) and applaud the effort. Not only is it about local produce but also local publications, discussions, trades, etc... In EASTERN CANADA,. we have a far harder time supporting local food production initiatives for various reasons and I guess it is just a comparable endeavour. The weather, smaller markets, export mentality--historically based-- FOR WHAT DOES COME OUT OF HERE IN QTY..a few reasons why....pat yourselves on the back for the effort....freddychef one lamb down...
  13. While quality of food in a seasonal area like Cape Breton is a problem (I've worked there in the past) there are a few highlights...since the Red Shoe has reopened in mabou with menu items influenced by Chives in Halifax..give that a try..aslo in Mabou The Duncreigan inn...in Margaree harbour try island sunset resort....in Cheticamp try the Aucion bakery for real croissants....maybe go over to Aspey bay and try the oysters taken daily....glenora distillery as well...the other option is to do it yourself..a lot of loca lamb and trout around margaree as well just ask around.. in Cheticamp try the local Acadien restaurant as well freddychef
  14. While quality of food in a seasonal area like Cape Breton is a problem (I've worked there in the past) there are a few highlights...since the Red Shoe has reopened in mabou with menu items influenced by Chives in Halifax..give that a try..aslo in Mabou The Duncreigan inn...in Margaree harbour try island sunset resort....in Cheticamp try the Aucion bakery for real croissants....maybe go over to Aspey bay and try the oysters taken daily....glenora distillery as well...the other option is to do it yourself..a lot of loca lamb and trout around margaree as well just ask around..freddychef
  15. Hi I have to outfit a small college program for up to 20 studnets and have a limited idea of what will be required as faras appliances go. i was wondering though if there are any contacts out there that know of web sites that would help in this endeavour...freddychef
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